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The CRPF "Old Phones in Movies & TV" Compilation

Started by HobieSport, November 23, 2008, 01:45:19 AM

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david@london


TelePlay

And we are still struggling with finding the right key for a payphone vault.

This from Season 2 Episode 3 of NCIS, about 14 minutes into the episode, where Gibbs relies on his universal official Marine tool to open the vault in about 5 seconds to get the coins inside to check them for fingerprints.

(the AVI video of the short scene is attached in the attached zipped file)

Russ Kirk

Don't know if this was already posted.
If so, I can delete if requested.

This is from Grren Acres S2 E24, March 8, 1967
The wood phone painted blue caught my eye.

Snapshot from a paused recording. 

Russ...
- Russ Kirk
ATCA & TCI

compubit

Quote from: Russ Kirk on July 28, 2021, 07:26:12 PM
This is from Green Acres S2 E24, March 8, 1967
The wood phone painted blue caught my eye.

Ah, the joys of early color TV broadcasting - make it as colorful as you can!!! (Even if it's not such way in real life - though painting old wooden phones wouldn't have surprised me...)

J
A phone phanatic since I was less than 2 (thanks to Fisher Price); collector since a teenager; now able to afford to play!
Favorite Phone: Western Electric Trimline - it just feels right holding it up to my face!

Jim Stettler

Quote from: compubit on August 08, 2021, 10:44:11 PM
Ah, the joys of early color TV broadcasting - make it as colorful as you can!!! (Even if it's not such way in real life - though painting old wooden phones wouldn't have surprised me...)

J

I was told early color phones were created for the film industry. They were shooting in black & white , which seemed silly to me.

Since then I have learned some stuff about early black and white film making.
The main point is it is actually shades of Gray vs B&W.
I studied printing into high school and I learned gray scale . this helped me comprehend the difference.
Shooting B&W as shades of gray is a visual artform. Shooting color is easy.
Sorry I can't be clearer on my explanation.
They say Alfred Hitchcock was very good with shades of gray.
Jim

BTW early color tended to be oversaturated . Shades of gray require much more thought.

You live, You learn,
You die, you forget it all.

TelePlay

That is correct, two totally different colors may reflect the same amount of light in grey scale making them merge together, disappear into each other, when captured on B&W film. Actual color didn't matter when shooting in B&W, the amount of reflected light did. I bet the "color" schemes used for B&W movies and TV, including gels used to light the scene/set, looked quite strange to those on the set/scene.

Then there are shows like Green Acres that I think used intentionally whacky colors.

ReneRondeau

Rendering colors on black & white film was much more complicated in the early days, when film was orthochromatic (sensitive to the blue spectrum). Panchromatic films for movies began to come into use in the 'teens, but were still pretty rare until the '30s. Most still camera film was orthochromatic up to the mid-50s, when Kodak released the "Pan" version of Verichrome. With orthrochromatic films some colors are very skewed, e.g. blue renders as white, red as black, and yellow as very dark gray. Other colors are less dramatically off-tone but they can still register in ways that seem odd to modern eyes used to panchromatic film stocks.

Here's an example -- the license plate on my 1954 VW. I took the digital color shot a couple of years ago. I took the B&W a couple of days ago, using Ilford Ortho+, which is one of the very few vintage-formula orthochromatic films still on the market. Compare the red date tag at the lower right, the yellow numbers, and the color of the car.

Vintage photography is a lot of fun.



Nick in Manitou

I find that demonstration of the difference between the digital color photo and the Ilford Ortho+ just amazing. It makes me realize how much we must be missing when we look at the details of black and white photographs from long ago.

Nick

TelePlay

Did a double take on this scene. It looked like Eddie Haskell was holding a handset that was not attached to the beat up plastic WE 302. Turned out, the handset cord was a thin, possible cloth, cord running down the edge of his jacket and long enough to go below the bottom of the image before coming back up to the wrong side of the 302, the handset mouse hole is empty.

This is from the very first season of LITB (1957/58) and while the Haskell family was using a WE 302, the Cleaver family had a very nice Ivory or Beige WE 500.

FABphones

Image 1:
'Carry On Abroad'.   The hotel switchboard (just before it blows up :o).

Image 2:
'Pipkins'.   Hartley Hare holding an upside down AEI Centenary Neophone handset...
...attached to a GPO 332 body.

(Looks like they had to pop the handset cord around the back of his ear to get it to stay in place).
;D
A collector of  'Monochrome Phones with Sepia Tones'   ...and a Duck!
***********
Vintage Phones - 10% man made, 90% Tribble
*************

FABphones

#895
Joan Crawford. 1939.

Adore that Ivory phone, would love to have one in the collection.

AE 1A ?
A collector of  'Monochrome Phones with Sepia Tones'   ...and a Duck!
***********
Vintage Phones - 10% man made, 90% Tribble
*************

Etienne

#896
A very nice ivory PTT 1924 behind Edwige Feuillère in Robert Siodmak's Mister Flow (1936).

Etienne

#897
Dr Mabuse, der Spieler- 1922
Das Testament des Dr Mabuse, 1933
Both by Fritz Lang

Etienne

Les diaboliques, Henri-Georges Clouzot- 1955
The mother-in-law earpiece is missing

markosjal

Quote from: Jim Stettler on August 10, 2021, 12:53:37 AM
I was told early color phones were created for the film industry. They were shooting in black & white , which seemed silly to me.

Since then I have learned some stuff about early black and white film making.
The main point is it is actually shades of Gray vs B&W.
I studied printing into high school and I learned gray scale . this helped me comprehend the difference.
Shooting B&W as shades of gray is a visual artform. Shooting color is easy.
Sorry I can't be clearer on my explanation.
They say Alfred Hitchcock was very good with shades of gray.
Jim

BTW early color tended to be oversaturated . Shades of gray require much more thought.

I studied Television Production and Engineering at a very early age and I agree with this statement although it may seem vague to some.

Shooting shades of gray , especially with old equipment was far more challenging than more modern color.
Phat Phantom's phreaking phone phettish