Author Topic: Another Russian paystation  (Read 1885 times)

Offline rdelius

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Another Russian paystation
« on: September 23, 2011, 02:24:41 PM »
Bought another one off ebay. The key that opens the main body of my old one fits this one too. Possibly used in Latvia.
robby

Offline LarryInMichigan

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Re: Another Russian paystation
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2011, 02:28:31 PM »
Understated elegance in the workers' paradise :)

Offline rdelius

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Re: Another Russian paystation
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2011, 02:57:43 PM »
Built by the Telta factory in Perm.Do not know if the rags stuffed in the handset under the capsules is factory or not.One is 15 kopeks and the other takes tokens.No ringers in them.Both built in the 1990s butmost likely designed in the 1960s Model AMT-69
Robby

Offline LarryInMichigan

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Re: Another Russian paystation
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2011, 03:03:09 PM »
It's interesting that the pictograph for dialing shows push buttons.  Also, I wouldn't expect that an instruction card installed during the glorious Soviet days would include the local language but not Russian.  The Kremlin frowned heavily on the use of Baltic languages.

What happens if one dials 04?  It doesn't look particularly pleasant.

Larry

Offline rdelius

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Re: Another Russian paystation
« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2011, 03:17:33 PM »
These built after the break up. I think 04 was to report a gas leak.The same telephone housing also had a touch pad that would replace the rotary dial.
Robby

Offline GG

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Re: Another Russian paystation
« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2011, 06:13:01 AM »


Actually there is a certain understated elegance about these: just a plain rectangular box with a handset, dial, and coin slot, and a simple instruction card. 

Question: I don't see a coin return; so is this mechanism similar to the Australian one where the coin just rests in the top of the channel until the called party answers, and then a reverse-polarity solenoid opens the channel so it swallows the coin?

Do these fit into your interests under a) payphones, b) Eastern Europe, c) international/foreign, or something else?

(I have a bunch of Eastern European phones from during the Soviet period, mostly RWT Elektrim from Poland but a few other interesting examples; will post photos some day.)

Offline rdelius

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Re: Another Russian paystation
« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2011, 09:04:32 PM »
The coin is held in place by a solonoid. The circuit has a beep tone -warning ?afier 75 seconds, the rec mutes with the tone. Have not gotten transmitter working yet. Tried different politary.Do not have a 15 kopeck coin to see if that works batter than a US dime.The dial has an exter set of contacts to count number of digits dialed.This might be for free emergancy calls as indicated in the instructions.Only one of the paystations has the electronic guts and coin sensers
Robby