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"The phone is a remarkably complex, simple device,
and very rarely ever needs repairs, once you fix them." - Dan/Panther

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#41
Collector's Corner / French Eurieult Type 10
Last post by countryman - Yesterday at 07:28:08 AM
I just received this wonderful phone. I'll post the sellers pics - I'm mostly based on natural light for clear pics and that is in short supply right now. It snows!
I could purchase this phone from a German collector at a reasonable price. It's missing the second receiver. The terminals and a cord restraint are there, but where the hook should be on the right hand side, there is only a blind plate. Besides one screw which is also missing, the object looks complete. It was manufactured in 1912. According to the few information available, "Type 10" does not refer to a model year in this case, but refers to the tenth model issued by the manufacturer Eurieult which was taken over by Grammont soon after. An appearance of the model around 1905 is mentioned. Have a look at the hookswitch! It fills the entire upper compartment.
The material of the lower box is called ivorine or ivoirine in one source. That name refers to a type of imitation ivory, what it clearly is not. It has more the look of mottled brown Bakelite, but feels different. Could it be "Galalith"? That would be casein (!) polymerized with formaldehyde?
Any additional information is welcome.
Sources I found so far:
http://www.l2l1.com/tel.htm
http://alain.levasseur.pagesperso-orange.fr/
#42
Western Electric Pay Phones / Re: Western El. 177G payphone ...
Last post by FABphones - Yesterday at 04:50:10 AM
Old 2018 thread but Gary still logs in to CRPF. 

Any update for us Gary?
#43
Western Electric Pay Phones / Re: Wiring 233G to subset
Last post by MMikeJBenN27 - Yesterday at 04:09:41 AM
Please, don't remove any of the relays!  Enjoy your find!

Mike
#44
It probably is 1929, updated in the early 50s, as post war payphones had that pivoting coin return bucket and didn't say "Grey Pay Station".  You have a prized item!  Please, don't "upgrade" it or throw any of the internals away!

Mike
#45
Wow!  What a find!  You lucky guy.  Don't change ANYTHING.  Keep this stock, as payphones, especially as old as this is, are getting pretty rare.  You have a true historical piece.  There are guys on this forum who have keys for the coin vault door.  Enjoy it!

Mike

#46
Western Electric Pay Phones / Re: Western El. 177G payphone ...
Last post by gk - Yesterday at 01:29:45 AM
Quote from: Key2871 on October 18, 2018, 04:59:12 PMHonestly I didn't notice that it had the wrong handset, I was drawn to the "instruction card", really makes me wonder why it had CO terms on it, as opposed to how to use the payphone.

Likely was used in the Fleetwood (FLWD) Pennsylvania central office for testing.  Fleetwood is about six miles (driving) southwest of Kutztown PA, and Reading PA is about 12 miles southwest of Fleetwood PA.  The WH4 NXX is assigned to the ILEC in the Fleetwood area (now called Verizon PA) and the OV3 NXX is assigned to the ILEC in Kutztown (also Verizon PA). 
#47
Dial Repair & Lubrication / Re: Dial Maintenance and Repai...
Last post by TelePlay - December 04, 2022, 10:35:53 PM
Quote from: Contempra on December 04, 2022, 10:22:15 PMFor me, the most complicated dials to repair and adjust are the Automatic Electric dials. (AE).

Interesting.

Once I realized taking the contact leaves pile up off an AE dial was the first thing to do, the rest of the dial was much easier to take apart, clean and reassemble. The main spring is right there in the open, the governor parts fully removable and carefully watching how the dialing ratchet parts under the finger wheel interact makes putting the mainspring back in quite simple.

I can do an AE dial in half the time it takes to clean and lube a WE dial, probably due to how WE hides their mainspring in a tunnel held together with a nut on the mainspring gear which requires extra attention when interfacing it with the gear train, and setting the proper gear mesh distances.

As for adjusting dial speed, WE dials are easier.
#48
Dial Repair & Lubrication / Re: Dial Maintenance and Repai...
Last post by Contempra - December 04, 2022, 10:22:15 PM
For me, the most complicated dials to repair and adjust are the Automatic Electric dials. (AE).
#49
Boxes are becoming rare. In any case, in Quebec I have never seen any that were sold with a telephone except in the past when the device belonged to Belle Canada. The only box I have is an original box that contains a caramel colored Contempra and is touch-tone. All my 8 other Contempra do not have their box. But it is practical to have them. it also avoids dust when you want to store them (phones)
#50
Telephone Troubleshooting and Repair / Re: WE 5H Dial Click
Last post by TelePlay - December 04, 2022, 10:17:02 PM
Quote from: TelePlay on December 04, 2022, 01:24:22 PMThere are only two springs in most WE dials, . . .

The #2 and #4 dials had a set screw adjustable arm inside the governor used to set the dial speed. As such, those dials only had 1 spring, the main spring.

The AE worm gear governor shaft, used by AE and other manufacturers, had 2 flat spring leaves attached to the worm gear shaft and each flat spring leaf had a brake pad at the end of the leaf (inside the governor raceway). The dial speed was adjusted by slightly bending these flat spring leaves in or out to increase or decrease (respectively) the dial speed, its PPS.

Bending the flat leaves required a faster rotation for the pads to contact the governor raceway and that would increase the PPS.

Bending the flat leaves outward, away from the worm shaft, would result in  the pads contacting the governor raceway at lower revolutions and that would decrease the dial's PPS.

Worm drive governor dials only have one spring, the mainspring.

Dials are simple complex mechanical instruments designed by engineers decades ago in such a way that employees hired off the street could put all of those little parts and pieces together to make a working dial.

As with all old stuff, they were made with the capability of being disassembled for restoration or repair, a time much different that today's toss and replace stuff.