Author Topic: Removing paint from Bakelite with gasoline  (Read 847 times)

Partyline4

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Removing paint from Bakelite with gasoline
« on: November 09, 2018, 12:59:56 PM »
Just thought I'd add this - sorry if someone has already!

Believe it or not GASOLINE is an excellent paint remover! Just got in a AE 50 covered in white paint, and it took every bit of it off with a cotton cloth and very light pressure. Dissolves it on contact without harming the bakelite....Followed by Doug Rose's SSS method produces a great result, as the gasoline really removes oils and grease from the bakelite surface.....Looks great to me

If you can handle the smell!

Offline HarrySmith

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Re: Removing paint from Bakelite with gasoline
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2018, 01:17:52 PM »
Just thought I'd add this - sorry if someone has already!

Believe it or not GASOLINE is an excellent paint remover! Just got in a AE 50 covered in white paint, and it took every bit of it off with a cotton cloth and very light pressure. Dissolves it on contact without harming the bakelite....Followed by Doug Rose's SSS method produces a great result, as the gasoline really removes oils and grease from the bakelite surface.....Looks great to me

If you can handle the smell!

Without pictures it did not happen! :)
Harry Smith
ATCA 4434
TCI

"There is no try,
there is only
do or do not"

Partyline4

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Re: Removing paint from Bakelite with gasoline
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2018, 02:10:35 PM »
Alrighty then!

Soak a rag in gas, and start rubbing! First picture is from eBay listing, and is exactly as I received it. No cracks or chips - just filthy!
dial turns perfectly smooth....

The gas is perfect for surface prep. Let it sit in the sun for a few hours to remove the smell....Then dampen a rag with Skin So Soft, and start rubbing - Again!

Really nice method from Doug Rose.
« Last Edit: November 09, 2018, 02:20:05 PM by Partyline4 »

Offline Doug Rose

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Re: Removing paint from Bakelite with gasoline
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2018, 02:12:36 PM »
The poor phone will smell like a Mobil Staion for the rest of its life.  Not only is it dangerous, Citrix stripper will peal the paint off Bakelite and you can use steel wool to help.

You picked a good day to give up smoking. The Marlboro and the phone will not be good friends.

The only method that is mine is the Avon SSS......Doug

Kidphone

Partyline4

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Re: Removing paint from Bakelite with gasoline
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2018, 02:20:51 PM »
The poor phone will smell like a Mobil Staion for the rest of its life.  Not only is it dangerous, Citrix stripper will peal the paint off Bakelite and you can use steel wool to help.

You picked a good day to give up smoking. The Marlboro and the phone will not be good friends.

The only method that is mine is the Avon SSS......Doug



No need to fret Doug, the phone is relieved of the gas smell once the gas has evaporated - even more so when the SSS is applied and allowed to sit. No smell at all here in the house!

Offline Doug Rose

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Re: Removing paint from Bakelite with gasoline
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2018, 02:28:54 PM »
Not fretting a bit.. the gas will get into all the crevices and parts in the phone that you did not remove.  No amount SSS will kill that smell. I get gas on my hand pumping gas, the smell does not go away when it evaporates. I will continue with the Citrix.....Doug
Kidphone

Partyline4

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Re: Removing paint from Bakelite with gasoline
« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2018, 04:31:37 PM »
I've informed readers of a great solvent to use in aiding the removal of paint.  It's smelly, but it worked for me and I am satisfied.  I think others can benefit from this information.

Also,  as learned from a lawn mower mechanic. You can leave a cup of gas outdoors and allow the smelly stuff to evaporate.  What is left is a very good solvent for removing many sticky substances.

Phone isn't smelly other than the pleasant odor of skin so soft.
« Last Edit: November 09, 2018, 05:36:46 PM by TelePlay »

Offline andy1702

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Re: Removing paint from Bakelite with gasoline
« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2019, 11:41:39 AM »
That's interesting about gasoline. I have vintage stationary engines that i take to shows and I have to be very careful filling the tanks because the slightest spill makes the paint blister. So I can certainly vouch for it as paint stripper.

The bit I didn't know was that you can evaporate the smelly stuff off. Is the bit that smells also the bit that goes bang? I ask because I know for a fact that old gasoline won't run an engine. I had a car that sat in the garage for a couple of years and wouldn't start when I came to move it. Changing the gas resulted in in starting up first time! Aparently gasoline (or petrol for the Brits) goes bad after a few months. Diesel doesn't though.
Call me on C*net 0246 81 290 from the UK
or (+44) 246 81 290 from the rest of the world.

For telephone videos search Andys Shed on Youtube.

Offline HarrySmith

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Re: Removing paint from Bakelite with gasoline
« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2019, 12:38:46 PM »
Yes, gas does go bad after sitting. As far as evaporation, I don't think so. I did a very foolish & dangerous thing once as a kid. We found an old abandoned van in the back of an industrial park one time. It had been sitting for a long, long time. Some animals had moved in and it looked like a person had lived in it for a while. We played in & on it for weeks, had a blast! It was around the 4th of July. I had a genius thought one day and dropped a lit match in the gas tank! The tank was dry as we had already attempted to siphon it out, our hose never hit any liquid all the way to the bottom of the tank. It also had been open the entire time as the gas cap was long gone. There was a loud "WOOF" sound and a fireball shot out the filler and hit the wall of a building across the street. We were very lucky there was not an explosion! The gas had evaporated long ago but it still went BANG!
Harry Smith
ATCA 4434
TCI

"There is no try,
there is only
do or do not"