News:

"The phone is a remarkably complex, simple device,
and very rarely ever needs repairs, once you fix them." - Dan/Panther

Main Menu

how to determine WE model

Started by Jim Cummings, June 24, 2017, 04:03:23 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

Jim Cummings

I have a Western Electric desk top rotary phone.  I believe it is a 500, but not 100% sure.  The phone works with the exception of the ringer.  I've looked at a lot of the wiring diagrams and mine appears to match.  I'll attach photo if possible.

The phone came from a Funeral Home and I wondering if the ringer has been disabled somehow.

There is a module C NET 425B where wires connect.


AL_as_needed

Western Electric phones are generally stamped with the model number and month/year on the bottom  (left side by ringer when upside down). For your ringer there are two main things; 1, there is a bias spring, its a small wire spring that sits below the clapper and can be set to hi or lo bias. Based on your pic, yours is set to hi. Below are some pictures up close (kinda) of the same ringer in a wall phone. This one is set to "lo". To adjust, simply move the spring wire alone the within the slot.
TWinbrook7

poplar1

Move the black ringer wire from G to L1.

(G is where the yellow line cord wire is terminated. The green line cord wire is already on L1).

"C'est pas une restauration, c'est une rénovation."--François Martin.

Jim Cummings

Moving the black ringer wire solved the problem.  I read about moving the wire earlier and even did some testing, but wasn't successful.  The problem then was I misread the posting and thought I was to connect the black line cord wire.  Once I realized my error and I moved the 'ringer' wire the phone worked.  HOORAY!!!  Now I'm off to read postings about cleaning/polishing the bakelite cover.

TelePlay

Quote from: Jim Cummings on June 25, 2017, 08:04:04 AM
Moving the black ringer wire solved the problem.  I read about moving the wire earlier and even did some testing, but wasn't successful.

That's the problem and solution to "ringer not working" on a 500 a majority of the time.


Quote from: Jim Cummings on June 25, 2017, 08:04:04 AM
Now I'm off to read postings about cleaning/polishing the bakelite cover.

What date is stamped on the side of the 425B network. I doubt you have a Bakelite housing but there are two different types of plastic used for housings and they do require different polishing materials.

And the network date is really that date of the base. The housing may have been changed over its history. Are there any dates on the inside edge of the housing?
Yesterday eats you up, it eats everyone up . . .

paul-f

Welcome to the group, Jim.

There were loads of variations of the 500-type set, made by Western Electric and others. The most common dial set is the 500D.

Some of the model codes we have discovered so far can be seen here:
   http://www.paul-f.com/we500typ.htm

The Bell System Practices numbers in the right column can be looked up in the TCI Library and other on-line sites. They include info on the technical details and wiring.
   http://www.telephonecollectors.info/
Visit: paul-f.com         WE  500  Design_Line

.

Jim Cummings

The phone that needs cleaning/polishing has a C NET 425E module dated 12-64.  The date stamped in white letters on the base is  the same.  I'm guessing it's not bakelite but rather black plastic.

Victor Laszlo

The permanently installed metal box with the screw terminals is called the "network."  Every 500-type phone and any derivative has one. The one in your phone is a 425B. Calling it anything else can cause confusion.

unbeldi

Quote from: Victor Laszlo on June 25, 2017, 05:45:05 PM
The permanently installed metal box with the screw terminals is called the "network."  Every 500-type phone and any derivative has one. The one in your phone is a 425B. Calling it anything else can cause confusion.

The 425B had only black tops.   The 425E (as described by the poster) has the white plastic top, introduced about 1963. It also gained a screw connection for the C terminal, instead of the soldered wire.  They are perfectly equivalent.

paul-f

Quote from: Victor Laszlo on June 25, 2017, 05:45:05 PM
The permanently installed metal box with the screw terminals is called the "network."  Every 500-type phone and any derivative has one. The one in your phone is a 425B. Calling it anything else can cause confusion.

Check out the 529B in 502-560-109.  It has no network!
  http://www.telephonecollectors.info
Visit: paul-f.com         WE  500  Design_Line

.

Alex G. Bell

Quote from: Jim Cummings on June 25, 2017, 12:23:31 PM
The phone that needs cleaning/polishing has a C NET 425E module dated 12-64.  The date stamped in white letters on the base is  the same.  I'm guessing it's not bakelite but rather black plastic.
To clarify, the side of the network is marked with a map of the terminal designations.  The "C" you see before "NET 425" is the ID of the terminal in the front left corner of the network.  Hence as others have said, it's 425 type network abbreviated to "NET".

Alex G. Bell

Quote from: paul-f on June 25, 2017, 06:04:32 PM
Check out the 529B in 502-560-109.  It has no network!
  http://www.telephonecollectors.info
NOW you're being a contrarian by pointing out THE exception which "proves the rule" (whatever THAT means!).   ::)

paul-f

#12
Quote from: Alex G. Bell on June 26, 2017, 02:18:17 AM
NOW you're being a contrarian by pointing out THE exception which "proves the rule" (whatever THAT means!).   ::)

Found an interesting reference on THAT subject:

   http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/exception-that-proves-the-rule.html

Visit: paul-f.com         WE  500  Design_Line

.