Classic Rotary Phones Forum

Telephone Talk => Forum News => How To Post Photos on CRPF => Topic started by: DavePEI on March 14, 2013, 01:45:19 PM

Title: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: DavePEI on March 14, 2013, 01:45:19 PM
Something I thought we should have is a space for hints for taking photos for CRPF postings with digital cameras.  First of all, I am not what you might call an accomplished photographer, but I have taken many phone photos, and thought I would pass along to others some hints that I have learned over the years. Whether you use an expensive DSLR, or a simpler 10 megapixel camera, you can get good results.

So, I will start it off with a few suggestions..

a) Number one! Get to know the Macro mode on your camera. Macro is generally shown on a camera as a flower symbol (depending of course on manufacturer variations)  The more close-up your photo is taken, the more macro mode is needed. Check you manual for more information. On my Canons, it is extremely easy to use, and allows the camera to focus on objects much closer than normal, and resulting on photos being more in focus. You can generally look at a photo and tell if it was taken in Macro mode or not, just by how good the focus is. No doubt you have seen horribly unfocussed - even unidentifiable shots on eBay - the Macro mode when used properly will prevent these.

If you don't have the manual for your camera, Google for
Macro Mode on (Manufacturer of camera) (Model of Camera)
You should find a number of articles specific to your camera
 or to a model very similar to it..

i.e. Canon T1i: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZ1ONGlH11Y

b) Always, before posting, re-size your photos so they are a maximum of 1200x1200 pixels and 91828 KB in size. Larger sizes are not necessary, and will slow the loading of the forum, as well as taking up needless space in the forum's photo directory. I generally will post photos sized 1000 pixels or smaller in the largest dimension. This is still large enough that it will post in a thumbnail format, that you can click on to view a larger version.

c) Good lighting is important for best results. For many photos, I use a light tent. Shown below is a light tent I use. The one I use is Polaroid branded. This was picked up on eBay for about $40. including the side floods, backdrops, and camera stand. Non-polaroid branded ones are available as well.

The idea is to provide a solid background for your photo while eliminating shadows using the side lights diffused through the fabric.

The camera sits on the front pod, and the tent is used in conjunction with your camera's built-in flash. It is a cheap one, but it works.

I confess, I don't always use this, as it takes time to set up, but for a perfect shot, it is invaluable for preventing shadows, and for providing a solid background,.

--

Lacking a light tent, use whatever works best for you. Many people quite successfully take their photos outside in full sunshine to good effect. Direct overhead sunlight will also effectively eliminate shadows.

--

d) Another accessory I use often is a circline LED light which mounts around the lens. This will eliminate even more lighting differences by eliminating a lot of the glare you can get from a flash. The light I have will only work with my DSLR Canon - it is too large to fit on the A640 lens ring. I am not sure if there are smaller diameters made.

This is all part of eliminating shadows which distract from your photo. Between the solid front lighting provided by one of these, and the diffused side lighting given by the use of a light tent, if will eliminate most shadows.

Aside from this, the solid light will help your camera to focus properly on the object being photographed.

Below, a photo of a light tent, minus its top  cover, and my circline light..

--

The danger of my undertaking this section is one might expect to see professional quality photos from me. That won't be the case, as I don't always listen to my own advice. Often, I will snap a quick photo just to get something up. But the overall goal, is to get all of us to think when we take shots for posting, and to improve the overall quality of the photos on the forum. If it helps beyond that, wonderful!

I am sure everyone has some great ideas worth passing along. Improving your photos doesn't need to be costly, mostly a matter of technique. Any other suggestions or different methods? Lets share our ideas with others!

Dave
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: Mr. Bones on March 15, 2013, 09:19:23 PM
Thanks, Dave, for the superb tips, and recommendations!

     I find these most helpful, as I am sure most here will, also.

     I have a few additional suggestions, as solicited by your post, to make this easy-peasy for all here on the forum: I shall comply, myself, having previously posted several over-sized, under-focused photos. We shall have to remedy that, then...

     Due to time constraints, I will post a few suggestions, in serial fashion, so that I can continue accomplishing the required, here, at home...

     1>  Use a tripod. Do it. Buy a cheap one, if you have one not. Wally-world has more-than-adequate ones for >$20.  

     2> Use the delay setting on your camera, so your hand is not on the camera when the 'shutter' snaps. Zero camera motion=the most possible clarity that your camera can produce. That's what we all likey, right? ;)

     More to come, following a few errands...thanks for your time, and indulgence...

Best regards! ;)
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: DavePEI on March 15, 2013, 09:24:53 PM
I think the important thing is for people to do the best they can with the equipment they have - often just a little learned technique can make a huge difference!

We all want to concentrate what cash we have to spare (even what we don't have to spare in my case) into our phone collecting! So we don't want to spend a lot on new photographic equipment.  But we can use what we do have to its best advantage.

The better the photo, the easier it will be for other users to see your photo. In a case where you are showing the wiring of a phone to diagnose a problem, the clearer the photo the better!

Much of what I will suggest here has been learned running the Island Register web site since 1991. During those years, I have gone from scanned film photos, to a lousy Fuji digital not even as good as today's webcams, then through a series of 3 digital Canon Cameras, a Powershot G2, then the Powershot A640 and the Rebel t1i DSLR. I have watched as digital cameras and media improved and matured into equipment meeting and exceeding the quality of 35 mm film. Sadly, today's digital quality has killed roll film photography.

I know I have posted some poor photos myself in the past - the main thing is we all try to do our best given the equipment and knowledge we have at the time!

Dave
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: Mr. Bones on March 15, 2013, 10:37:42 PM
I think the important thing is for people to do the best they can with the equipment they have - often just a little learned technique can make a huge difference!

The better the photo, the easier it will be for other users to see your photo. In a case where you are showing the wiring of a phone to diagnose a problem, the clearer the photo the better!

I know I have posted some poor photos myself in the past - the main thing is we all try to do our best!

Dave
Dave,

     I am in total agreement with you, and hoping to augment your initial posting with a few tips and tricks, as requested, based upon 17+ years custom web designing, and graphics experience. It's so easy, even I can do it!

     >Use the highest resolution that your particular camera can photograph. Save the photos in a non-compressed format, such as a bitmap (.bmp)You can always reduce it, by means of an editing program. You cannot, however, increase it, to try to see a critical detail that you might have missed, while you had your phone apart for pictures.

     >There are many, many free / shareware photo-editing programs available...I strongly advise against going and spending $500.00-$1000.00+ for the latest, greatest version of Photoshop, etc.

     The learning curve, due to the amount of options available, is quite formidable, and, unless you are a professional graphics-guru, for your daily bread-and-butter, there is little, or no justification for even a fraction of the expenditure. One can buy quite a lot of cool telephone stuff, for the money... spend it there, instead.

     I use an old JASC program, Paint Shop Pro 4.14. I have newer versions of same, but I can recommend this one, for ease-of-approachability, especially for those not versed in computer graphics work. It can be downloaded, shareware, for zero dollars, zero cents. I will gladly provide a link, if any are interested.

     I will gladly provide tutorial assistance to forum members in the manipulation of captured graphics, to make them forum-compliant.

     More to come...

Best regards!
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: DavePEI on March 16, 2013, 02:18:27 AM
I also use Photoshop 5.5 and Paint Shop Pro x5 (now distributed by Corel) because I already had it for my web design. But as Mr. Bones suggested,  there are cheaper and freeware programs one can use as well. I also have them because of my web design and running the Island Register.

Both work well, but for most work, I prefer Photoshop. A suitable program for photo manipulation, cropping and resizing may even have come bundled with your camera software.

I will list some free image editing software later.

--

e) One hint that I might add, is when taking a photo of, for example, a section of a circuit, back off from the shot - don't try to take it too close. You will need to crop the shot anyway, so just crop the extraneous stuff to bring it down to suggested sizes. Don't reduce the complete photo, do it by cropping to the part you wish to show. That is where you see the advantages of the higher megapixel cameras - they take a huge photo which can be cropped to show only part of the whole shot. By doing so, you can improve the focus of the area you wish to show.

eg, the Canon Rebel t1i DSLR, a 15.1 megapixel camera will take photos in the following sizes:

RAW 4752 x 3168 - 20.2 MB,
Fine JPEG 4752 x 3168 - 5 MB,

Normal JPEG 4752 x 3168 - 2.5 MB,
Fine JPEG 3456 x 2304 - 3 MB,
Normal JPEG 3456 x 2304 - 1.6 MB,
Fine JPEG 2352 x 1568 - 1.7 MB,
Normal JPEG 2352 x 1568 - 0.9 MB
Plus several HD Video modes.

The Canon Powershot A640, a 10 megapixel camera has a maximum resolution of  3648 x 2736 pixels, with other selectable resolutions of 2816 x 2112, 2272 x 1704, 1600 x 1200, 640 x 480 pixels. It will also take video, but not HD as in the T1i. This in my opinion would be a good choice if you are considering the purchase of a used fixed lens camera. They can often be purchased quite inexpensively.

Bold=Recommended Resolutions

These two cameras are mentioned only as they are the ones I am most familiar with.

I normally take in the highest resolution available, then crop or resize down to what I need.

f) Another hint I might add. Before disassembling your new phone take several shots from several different directions at high resolution. You can refer to these later one when you re-assemble it to ensue you have wired it correctly! This has saved my butt a couple of occasions!

g) If you frequently take pictures with your digital camera, the purchase of a card reader for your computer can be an excellent investment. When you use a reader, you take the card out of the camera, plug it into your reader, and transfer of your photos will be many times faster than with the umbilical that comes with your camera.

Dave
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: TelePlay on March 16, 2013, 11:00:40 AM
I also use Photoshop 5.5

I've been using Photoshop Elements for more than a decade. It has most of the editing features of the full blown Photoshop but at much less the cost and with a lot less disk and memory usage requirement. I don't use 80% of what they provide for photo editing but the 20% I do is worth the price.

Started with Photoshop Deluxe about 1990 and when that was discontinued, Adobe sent me to elements. It's about $70 now (was $100 10 years ago) but well worth it. Here's a link to it on Amazon (and it is available elsewhere). There are other similar software programs out there so this is just one person's recommendation of one product.

http://tinyurl.com/c5w6rd8

There have been other discussions of software on the forum. I recently researched several for a friend. The web conclusion was they all work well but with Adobe having a giant share of the market, their support was better and most likely long term (photos from prior versions could be read by future versions).
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: DavePEI on March 16, 2013, 11:30:27 AM
I also use Photoshop 5.5

I've been using Photoshop Elements for more than a decade. It has most of the editing features of the full blown Photoshop but at much less the cost and with a lot less disk and memory usage requirement. I don't use 80% of what they provide for photo editing but the 20% I do is worth the price.

Yes, Photoshop Elements works well for basic image manipulation.

Another great piece of software which is totally free is Irfanview. "IrfanView is one of the longest-serving and most popular freeware image editors available. Fast, compact, and flexible, IrfanView is also packed with features and extras, including TWAIN support, frames and borders, and slideshows, wallpaper, and screenshots".

Read more: IrfanView - CNET Download.com http://download.cnet.com/IrfanView/#ixzz2NiskDVaV

Download: http://www.irfanview.com/

--

There is also GIMP for Windows, also free: http://www.gimp.org/

"GIMP is a popular open-source image editor originally developed for Unix/Linux. Often lauded as the "free Photoshop," it does have an interface and features similar to Photoshop, but with a steep learning curve to match".

Read more on GIMP: http://download.cnet.com/GIMP/3000-2192_4-10073935.html?tag=contentBody;pop

Dave
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: DavePEI on March 29, 2013, 08:37:36 PM
can someone tell me how to upload a photo for my profile photo? thankyou. southernphoneman.

First of all, your profile has to be very small - 100x100 pixels - no larger. You must reduce the file size in a graphics editor. It cannot be a normal size photo.

Then you go to your profile.

Then you click on Forum Profile Information.

Halfway down the page, you will see "I will upload my own picture".

Use the pick box to upload the small profile picture.

Click on change profile at the bottom.

Done.
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: southernphoneman on March 29, 2013, 09:13:40 PM
looks like I got it dave,thank you. :) ;)....southernphoneman
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: WesternElectricBen on March 29, 2013, 10:51:30 PM
Didn't know light tents were that cheep. I hate a plain black back ground. If I buy one I plan to cut and place wood paneling in back to make it go with the phone and it won't look boring white!

Ben
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: DavePEI on March 30, 2013, 05:18:28 AM
Didn't know light tents were that cheep. I hate a plain black back ground. If I buy one I plan to cut and place wood paneling in back to make it go with the phone and it won't look boring white!
Well, now that's part of the reason for using a plain background. You see the item you are photographing, and not the distraction of a cluttered background. Take a look at the photo of the Ti1 above. Much better, as it stands out from the page, and your eyes focus on it, itself, instead of a multicoloured background.

Aside from that, the light tent allows you to get rid of the shadows which surround a flash photo.

Dave
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: WesternElectricBen on March 30, 2013, 09:06:45 AM
Didn't know light tents were that cheep. I hate a plain black back ground. If I buy one I plan to cut and place wood paneling in back to make it go with the phone and it won't look boring white!
Well, now that's part of the reason for using a plain background. You see the item you are photographing, and not the distraction of a cluttered background. Take a look at the photo of the Ti1 above. Much better, as it stands out from the page, and your eyes focus on it, itself, instead of a multicoloured background.

Aside from that, the light tent allows you to get rid of the shadows which surround a flash photo.

Dave

I have to disagree, I like minimal "custom" effect like a painted wall or a wood desk to take pictures on.

Ben
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: AE_Collector on March 30, 2013, 11:51:48 AM
Take a look at the photo of the Ti1 above. Much better,

Dave

What is a Ti1 and where is it's picture above?

Terry

<edit>  
okay, found it.... The camera. Last time I bought a new SLR camera, Canon was still in the "Model A" range! AE1 in 1977! It was THE camera to purchase then.

Terry
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: DavePEI on March 30, 2013, 03:29:31 PM

okay, found it.... The camera. Last time I bought a new SLR camera, Canon was still in the "Model A" range! AE1 in 1977! It was THE camera to purchase then.

Hi Terry:

Yep, that's the one with the circular flash mounted on the front...

Dave

Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: Mr. Bones on March 30, 2013, 09:59:25 PM
I have to disagree, I like minimal "custom" effect like a painted wall or a wood desk to take pictures on.
Ben
     Everybody has their own personal preferences, and it most certainly depends on why one is photographing a phone.

     In the case of trying to show extreme detail, in order to sell, let's say, an extremely rare or choice phone... I would most likely utilize the light tent method, or at least a background that would be seamless, and not detract from the subject.

     That being said, for everyday phone photos, I have to agree with WesternElectricBen's taste in aesthetics.

      I, myself, like pictures that show telephones in their 'natural habitat', such as an old rolltop desk, kitchen wall, and often with other items of similar vintage, i.e.; antique radios, kitchenware, signage, furniture, etc.

     For me, few things are warmer and more comforting than the 'Homey' feel this type of setting creates.

Best regards!

     
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: Mr. Bones on March 30, 2013, 10:13:03 PM

Last time I bought a new SLR camera, Canon was still in the "Model A" range! AE1 in 1977! It was THE camera to purchase then.
Terry
      I bought a new Canon SLR on base at the NEX in 1986... I had scrimped and saved to get an AE-1, and when I finally went in to get one, horrors!!! :o They had sold the last one, and had the new EOS models in the display case.

     I was quite crestfallen, to say the least, but the clerk told me that they had one remaining A-1, for the same price the AE-1 had been marked down to on closeout!

     I got the A-1 body, and basic 50mm lens for less than the AE-1 body alone had been, just a few weeks previous. I have never, for a minute, been disappointed with it, since that day.

     It's still quite a jewel of a camera!

Best regards!
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: twocvbloke on March 30, 2013, 10:29:17 PM
The three cameras I use are my Vivitar ViviCam 5385, my Samsung Galaxy S3 phone, and my Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1... :)

The Vivitar is about 6 or 7 years old now, but still does a good job when I need decent photos, though I don't use it much these days as I have to remember to charge up some AA batteries to use it, so I generally go for the Samsungs as they're usually to hand and already charged... :)

The two Galaxy devices have their own advantages, the Tab can be held quite still given it's size, and the phone has an "Assistive light" option which I can turn on before I use the camera, and it floods the area with light so the camera will properly focus on the object and colour balance properly, still get the bright spots, but most of the pics I've taken like that haven't turned out too bad... :)
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: WesternElectricBen on March 31, 2013, 11:40:05 AM
I have to disagree, I like minimal "custom" effect like a painted wall or a wood desk to take pictures on.
Ben
     Everybody has their own personal preferences, and it most certainly depends on why one is photographing a phone.

     In the case of trying to show extreme detail, in order to sell, let's say, an extremely rare or choice phone... I would most likely utilize the light tent method, or at least a background that would be seamless, and not detract from the subject.

     That being said, for everyday phone photos, I have to agree with WesternElectricBen's taste in aesthetics.

      I, myself, like pictures that show telephones in their 'natural habitat', such as an old rolltop desk, kitchen wall, and often with other items of similar vintage, i.e.; antique radios, kitchenware, signage, furniture, etc.

     For me, few things are warmer and more comforting than the 'Homey' feel this type of setting creates.

Best regards!

     

Thats a really good point, for eBay auctions that makes sence.
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: TelePlay on April 06, 2013, 08:05:02 AM
This just came up on eBay. It's a good example of how not to use back lighting, the need for a tripod, a good example of how to use a background color not the same as the item and the need to purchase or make a light tent of some sort to diffuse the light.

Seller says it a "Vintage Bell System WesternElectric phone receiver cream color" and could be but not in this photo.

And, Dave, thanks for the info about the Polaroid light tent you use. Just got one for about $42 with free shipping and it's much better than the light tent I made out of stuff laying around the basement.
 
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: DavePEI on April 06, 2013, 09:33:47 AM
Another photo of a  bad, bad photo is featured in the CRPF Award for "Worst Picture of an ebaY auction item" topic:

http://www.classicrotaryphones.com/forum/index.php?topic=3908.0

Still trying to figure out what it is, but it reminds me of the photo below it! Look way up the worm hole. See the detail a little focusing can show? :)
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: DavePEI on April 12, 2014, 09:14:44 PM
Hi Folks:

I detailed two of my cameras earlier in this thread, the Canon T1i DSLR and the Canon Powershot A540.

Recently, I have been looking for a cheap digital to keep in the car. On a local electronics Buy Sell and trade board, I saw a Canon Powershot A490 and charger for sale used for $20.

It is a 10 megapixel compact digital camera capable of taking images up to 3648x2726. Figuring it would be at least good enough to take photos for the car, I decided to fork out the $20 and pick it up. Original dealer price was about $170.00 - $190.00 new. I couldn't believe my luck, and that would spare my original cameras from wear and tear in the car. Now, after trying it out, it is hard to say which is the better camera.

After a few test shots, I am amazed by the quality of its photos. Moreover, in its automatic mode, it will detect when it is close to the item being photographed, and automatically switch over to the Macro mode, taking excellent close-ups. No need to do it manually. The other thing I noticed about it is it has an exceptional flash. When taking a photo in a dark room, the entire room is lit up, and not only the subject. If you have nothing else and you can find one of these for a reasonable price, it is an excellent camera for forum posts or other uses - at least as good as the more expensive A540.

So I guess what I am saying, if your budget is limited, and if you see one of these for sale second hand don't discount its abilities. Pick it up immediately. With it taking full size pictures, you can fit about 6000 photos on a 16 GB SDHC card. The camera operates off 2 NiMH AA  batteries, which according to specs will take about 400 shots per charge. Cell phone cameras do not offer the clear focus and detail offered by a dedicated camera.

Manual: http://canon.ca/inetCA/products?m=gp&pid=849 (http://canon.ca/inetCA/products?m=gp&pid=849)

Below, shot of first page of camera manual, and below that a sample shot of the battery charger which came with it to show its macro mode shots. Photo has been reduced in size to 600x319 for posting here.

Dave
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: Sargeguy on April 16, 2014, 12:21:46 AM
How do I shrink my photos once I have uploaded them?  1000 seems to big and I want to shrink them to 640 without editing them and reloading them all.  What values do I add to the img string?

Note: So people could quote this, I had to remove the square brackets around the work img in the last line above, as it caused all quotes to fail..... Dave
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: DavePEI on April 16, 2014, 05:48:55 AM
How do I shrink my photos once I have uploaded them?  1000 seems to big and I want to shrink them to 640 without editing them and reloading them all.  What values do I add to the img string?

Actually, I don't believe the Forum software supports image size tags.

I had a devil of a time replying to your message, and finally figured out what the problem was. You had used the square brackets around the word img - as a result, the board was seeing that as in incomplete img tag and if you quoted the test of your message, you would get the quote and not the reply. So I edited your original post to remove the square brackets - this is the fourth time I tried to reply :)

I have typed this 4 times before and lost it, but I think it is working now.

Alas, when you upload an image using the Attachments and other options image upload routine, the software accepts it in whatever size it is uploaded as. Then it is displayed in a reduced size thumbnail. Then, if one wants to view it in a larger size, the reader can click on the photo with their mouse, and view it in a new wiindow in a larger size.

The maximum size thumbnail I have seen on the screen is about 600 pixels wide, so I wonder why you would want to make it smaller? If you were to make it smaller, you would eliminate the ability for interested people to click to get a larger size. If you want to display it smaller, you would have to upload it in a smaller size (but you will note that if you upload an image in 640x480, it will display in just about that size anyway - only thing it will do is prevent people from viewing it in a larger size if they want to.

I am assuming you are probably thinking of your signs? Let me think about it and I will play with the idea and see if I can come up with something that will help you!

Dave
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: Sargeguy on April 16, 2014, 07:41:13 AM
Sorry about that! Yes , they are displaying too large even though I had saved them with a width of 800 pixels. One of the photos I deleted had a value of img: width=1000 or something like that.
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: DavePEI on April 16, 2014, 08:34:09 AM
Sorry about that! Yes , they are displaying too large even though I had saved them with a width of 800 pixels. One of the photos I deleted had a value of img: width=1000 or something like that.
Yes, but the image size that shows under the photo isn't the size of it as displayed in the thumbnail - it is the full size of the photo. The actual thumbnail is 600x something. It is only when you double click on it that you see the full size photo.

Dave
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: Fabius on April 26, 2014, 08:36:58 PM
Thanks for the great tips. I don't have Photo Shop but I use a free photo editor that I really like. It's call PicMonkey:

http://www.picmonkey.com/


Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: andre_janew on December 17, 2014, 08:19:36 PM
In regards to Reply #18, light colored objects should be photographed against a dark background. Florescent lights do not produce the harsh shadows that incandescent lights do.  A light background is best for dark objects.

My problem has been blurry pictures.  I know that the flower setting is for distances of less that  three feet and that the mountain setting is for distances of more than three feet.  I have also upped the resolution on my digital camera.  That has really cleared things up!  I could up the resolution some more, but if I up it too much the pictures will not upload (or do I mean download?).  My camera is capable of taking HD pictures, but such pictures would be too good to post.  Does that make sense? 
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: WesternElectricBen on December 17, 2014, 08:54:30 PM
In regards to Reply #18, light colored objects should be photographed against a dark background. Florescent lights do not produce the harsh shadows that incandescent lights do.  A light background is best for dark objects.

My problem has been blurry pictures.  I know that the flower setting is for distances of less that  three feet and that the mountain setting is for distances of more than three feet.  I have also upped the resolution on my digital camera.  That has really cleared things up!  I could up the resolution some more, but if I up it too much the pictures will not upload (or do I mean download?).  My camera is capable of taking HD pictures, but such pictures would be too good to post.  Does that make sense?
Your pictures appear to be very scrunched, do they look fine on your computer? Or is the forum scrunching them?

Ben
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: DavePEI on December 17, 2014, 09:41:05 PM
My problem has been blurry pictures.  I know that the flower setting is for distances of less that  three feet and that the mountain setting is for distances of more than three feet.  I have also upped the resolution on my digital camera.  That has really cleared things up!  I could up the resolution some more, but if I up it too much the pictures will not upload (or do I mean download?).  My camera is capable of taking HD pictures, but such pictures would be too good to post.  Does that make sense?

The way most Macro modes work is put it in Macro (flower) mode, aim the camera at the item to be taken, and press the shutter down half way. You will see on the screen as it adjusts its focus. When it has adjusted, press the rest of the way down. I have seen many cameras that do a very poor job in Macro unless you do it that way.

Insofar as reducing the size of a photo, you are correct - to get the best photo as possible it should be taken in maximum resolution. Then, you can reduce it in size or crop it to wanted areas without much loss. Your best bet to do this is to use an image program with a resize mode to process the file afterwards.

Dave
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: TelePlay on December 17, 2014, 10:00:16 PM
The way most Macro modes work is put it in Macro (flower) mode, aim the camera at the item to be taken, and press the shutter down half way. You will see on the screen as it adjusts its focus. When it has adjusted, press the rest of the way down.

That's a very good point, Dave, that we just take for granted and skip over that step when explaining how to take photos. My camera has two opposing small square Bradley's in the middle of the view window/finder. When I press the shutter down half way, the brackets show up in red indicating that the camera has not come into focus yet. When it gets into focus, the brackets turn green. Some times they do not turn green and I have to release the shutter button and start over. Sometimes it doesn't focus because I'm too close and have to back up a bit. Sometimes the camera can't get a good lock on the object and I have to hold a flat thin object of about the same color in front of the item being photographed to get the focus lock and then removing it before pushing the shutter down to take the picture. It's a lot easier to do that than try to explain it in words.
Title: Re: Hints For Taking Photos For CRPF Postings
Post by: TelePlay on June 13, 2017, 09:24:14 PM
This just came up on eBay. It's a good example of how not to use back lighting, the need for a tripod, a good example of how to use a background color not the same as the item and the need to purchase or make a light tent of some sort to diffuse the light.

Was rushing to take a photo of a 302 ringer mount today so free handed it in existing light, no flash. When I brought up the photo for processing, I ran for my tripod.

The image on the left was free handed, the one on the right using a tripod. The image on the left may not look bad in thumbnail size but if you click on the image and enlarge it, you will see the hand held motion blur. Goes away with a tripod and the camera set on timer mode.

They are a bit of a pain to set up and put away but the quality of the photos in existing or low light situations is very noticeable. I even lost some available light while getting the tripod and setting it up, the right image is a bit darker.

Posted here to support my hint posted some time ago.