Author Topic: Cleaning Coiled Cords  (Read 5436 times)

Offline Dennis Markham

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Re: Cleaning Coiled Cords
« Reply #15 on: August 22, 2013, 03:19:58 PM »
Ben, just keep the denatured alcohol away from your soft plastic.  It will melt it.  I've used it many times as the others have suggested for cleaning other plastics (and cords) and it works great.  Handy to have around.

Dennis thank you for telling me that, should I keep it away from the cords that come on soft plastic phones?
Ben

No, Ben.  Just don't use denatured alcohol on soft plastic.  Obviously you want to make sure the cords are dry before you install them (if they're covered with denatured alcohol).

Offline Matilo Telephones

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Re: Cleaning Coiled Cords
« Reply #16 on: November 22, 2013, 02:58:25 AM »
What materiel are these curly cords made of?

The phones I have have cords made of vinyl (PVC). I just put them in warm water with washing up liquid.

Then I pull and strech them gently(!) through a sponge a few times to clean between the curls thoroughly.

Sometimes these cords get a bit sticky with age. After cleaning I spray those with a little wax (available in shoe stores).
Groeten,

Arwin

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Offline Duffy

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Re: Cleaning Coiled Cords
« Reply #17 on: February 20, 2015, 07:49:00 PM »
I know this is an older thread, but I thought that I would add this. I cleaned up a 1981 Northern Telecom 440A Dawn phone that came in the lot that I purchased earlier this month. The coiled cord was very dirty and stained.  I did go though some of the posts on restoring the coiled cords and thought I would try something different. I washed the cord in dish soap and hot water. I used a Mr. Clean Magic Eraser on the cord as well and it came up fairly clean. There were still some stains on it. So I got out a deep frying pan filled it with water and some Clorox bleach, brought it to a boil and took it off the heat. Put the cord in it and let it soak for 15 minutes. I had the sink filled with cold water.  After soaking the cord, I dropped it into the cold water for a few minutes. Then I laid it on an old towel to dry. Looks a lot better now.
CDN Doug

Offline WesternElectricBen

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Re: Cleaning Coiled Cords
« Reply #18 on: February 20, 2015, 07:57:38 PM »
Looks really good, Doug.

Ben