Author Topic: French continental rotary telephone  (Read 4427 times)

Offline G-Man

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Re: French continental rotary telephone
« Reply #15 on: October 22, 2013, 01:19:54 AM »
Here is replacement cord if you feel comfortable replacing the existing cord.


Please note that I have not dealt with the sellers in these auctions so please make your own determination as to whether to deal with them or not.


Offline dsk

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Re: French continental rotary telephone
« Reply #16 on: October 22, 2013, 04:14:44 AM »
The plug on the picture are Australian, so the question will be: What kind of a line do you have, if you have one?

dsk

I have even got a regular New York number :-) 646 570 1796

Offline G-Man

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Re: French continental rotary telephone
« Reply #17 on: October 22, 2013, 06:26:10 AM »
The diagram does look similar, I figured it would be a replica as there are no markings or stickers, being in Australia makes sense that it would be from somewhere eastern. I'm really curious as to what it sounds like, any idea how much power would be needed to power the bell?

Just to clarify the comments from another post, the single-gong ringer is assuredly a straight-line ringer meaning it will ring on all common frequencies from 16~ to 66.6~.

I would not hazard a guess as to the amount of power* (mA/Watts) it that it consumes but typically ringing voltages from 60 to 110-volts are used.

*power is commonly misused on this list when referring to voltage as is resistance vs. impedance.

Offline G-Man

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Re: French continental rotary telephone
« Reply #18 on: October 22, 2013, 06:31:33 AM »
I should have added that since ringing voltage is typically current limited, for safetys sake, do not attempt to ring the bell directly from the mains supply!


The diagram does look similar, I figured it would be a replica as there are no markings or stickers, being in Australia makes sense that it would be from somewhere eastern. I'm really curious as to what it sounds like, any idea how much power would be needed to power the bell?

Just to clarify the comments from another post, the single-gong ringer is assuredly a straight-line ringer meaning it will ring on all common frequencies from 16~ to 66.6~.

I would not hazard a guess as to the amount of power* (mA/Watts) it that it consumes but typically ringing voltages from 60 to 110-volts are used.

*power is commonly misused on this list when referring to voltage as is resistance vs. impedance.