Author Topic: ringer box will it work with todays volatge and how should it be wired?(FIXED!)  (Read 5754 times)

Hello - I have a follow-up question regarding this thread.  I just bought a Western Electric model 20-BC desk stand wired to a Western Electric no. 43-J extension bell box from Phoneco Inc.  (They installed a modern network inside the ringer box, so it acts as the subset.)  Whenever this phone or another connected phone goes off-hook (and also when you go back on-hook), the clapper on this ringer box hits one of the bells for a quick "ding" (link to YouTube clip of this happening below).  I see the explanation of a biasing spring in poplar1's reply #41 here.  So am I understanding correctly that the "ding" when I pick up the phone is normal since I have this type of ringer box?  Or is this something I could prevent from happening somehow?  It's not a big deal to me, but I figured I should decide if its something that needs to be fixed now while the phone is still under warranty.

I should probably mention too that my phones are connected to an XLink BTTN device, so they can be paired with my cell phone (i.e. I'm not using the local phone company).

Video clip:  http://youtu.be/TUG2_jNrk_s
« Last Edit: February 25, 2014, 01:35:35 PM by newenglandhistorywalks »

Offline poplar1

  • ***
  • Posts: 6265
  • 1051-AL
The bell tap is normal if there is no biasing spring or it is too loose. The first thing to try is to reverse the incoming line wires from the wall.

You may be able to move the gongs further apart or you may want to try to try to add a spring.

When you hang up, go off hook, or dial, you are producing voltage spikes on the line. These are somewhat like the 20 Hertz ringing from the central office. (Some fax machines and cordless phones also respond to these spikes.)

The advantage is--you know if someone is using the phone and especially when the person hangs up.

These ringers were originally used on local battery lines with hand generators. There were  no dials and no dial tones on those lines.



Hello - I have a follow-up question regarding this thread.  I just bought a Western Electric model 20-BC desk stand wired to a Western Electric no. 43-J extension bell box from Phoneco Inc.  (They installed a modern network inside the ringer box, so it acts as the subset.)  Whenever this phone or another connected phone goes off-hook (and also when you go back on-hook), the clapper on this ringer box hits one of the bells for a quick "ding" (link to YouTube clip of this happening below).  I see the explanation of a biasing spring in poplar1's reply #41 here.  So am I understanding correctly that the "ding" when I pick up the phone is normal since I have this type of ringer box?  Or is this something I could prevent from happening somehow?  It's not a big deal to me, but I figured I should decide if its something that needs to be fixed now while the phone is still under warranty.

I should probably mention too that my phones are connected to an XLink BTTN device, so they can be paired with my cell phone (i.e. I'm not using the local phone company).

Video clip:  http://youtu.be/TUG2_jNrk_s

"C'est pas une restauration, c'est une rénovation."--François Martin.

Okay, thank you for the reply!  I think I will probably just leave it alone.


The bell tap is normal if there is no biasing spring or it is too loose. The first thing to try is to reverse the incoming line wires from the wall.

You may be able to move the gongs further apart or you may want to try to try to add a spring.

When you hang up, go off hook, or dial, you are producing voltage spikes on the line. These are somewhat like the 20 Hertz ringing from the central office. (Some fax machines and cordless phones also respond to these spikes.)

The advantage is--you know if someone is using the phone and especially when the person hangs up.

These ringers were originally used on local battery lines with hand generators. There were  no dials and no dial tones on those lines.