Author Topic: Components Needed to Build Stand-Alone Touch-Tone Keypad  (Read 8668 times)

Offline G-Man

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Re: Components Needed to Build Stand-Alone Touch-Tone Keypad
« Reply #15 on: March 18, 2014, 07:02:47 AM »
The 42 OPG dial shown in this Cortelco/ITT schematic shows a slightly different color code and layout.
 
Your dial may have been custom manufactured for North Supply under their Premier house brand; first by ITT and its successor, Cortelco and then by various Asian manufacturers.

Offline G-Man

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Re: Components Needed to Build Stand-Alone Touch-Tone Keypad
« Reply #16 on: March 18, 2014, 07:34:12 AM »
See if this schematic more closely matches your dial.

Offline Scotophor

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Re: Components Needed to Build Stand-Alone Touch-Tone Keypad
« Reply #17 on: March 19, 2014, 01:37:51 AM »
The 42 OPG dial shown in this Cortelco/ITT schematic shows a slightly different color code and layout.
 
Your dial may have been custom manufactured for North Supply under their Premier house brand; first by ITT and its successor, Cortelco and then by various Asian manufacturers.
Thanks for posting that. Yeah, it's a little different from my dial. Mine has seven wires including a green and a white but no brown/shield wire, and only one 2-position terminal marked "L2".
Name: A.J.   Location: LAPNCAXG, EDgewood 6

Offline Scotophor

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Re: Components Needed to Build Stand-Alone Touch-Tone Keypad
« Reply #18 on: March 19, 2014, 01:48:30 AM »
See if this schematic more closely matches your dial.
That looks like it, thank you very much! So, it appears to me that the option clip is used to disable the polarity guard. If I'm understanding the language correctly, moving the clip to the other position from where I found it, would make the dial polarity sensitive; i.e. it would not generate tones if the line polarity were reversed. Since I presently have no PBX and thus no use for polarity-switching as a control (as well as no desire to be able to automatically disable the adjunct dial), I'll leave the clip where it is.
Name: A.J.   Location: LAPNCAXG, EDgewood 6

Offline cornell9

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Re: Components Needed to Build Stand-Alone Touch-Tone Keypad
« Reply #19 on: November 17, 2016, 02:04:28 PM »
Sorry to revive an older thread - I am having some difficulty with the touch tone pad I was building.

My goal is to have one of the modular plugs go to the wall, and the other go to the 302 with modular plug, without having to open up the 302 itself.

I have a #72 dial and tried to follow this thread, and the directions here:  http://www.antiquetelephonehistory.com/ttpad.php

and here as well http://www.classicrotaryphones.com/forum/index.php?topic=458.msg73211#msg73211

So far the touch tone dial pad does not work, but the 302 works as normal when connected with the dial and line.

Offline Stan S

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Re: Components Needed to Build Stand-Alone Touch-Tone Keypad
« Reply #20 on: November 17, 2016, 10:54:31 PM »
Hello
I attached a diagram of your pad to this post.

The resistor should be 330 ohms (orange orange brown) . The pad is powered by the voltage drop across that resistor when it's in series with phone and the phone line and the phone is OFF HOOK.
It appears you have the wrong value. Looks like 33 ohms. Not enough voltage drop to power the pad.
 
If you want to use the polarity guard that's part of the pad, connect the (G) Green lugged lead to one side of the resistor. Then make a jumper from the other side of the resistor to the D terminal that's on the board.

If you don't want to use the polarity guard connect the OR/BK lead to one side of the resistor. Connect the BLACK lugged lead to the other side of the resistor. If the pad doesn't make tones reverse the tip and ring connections to the line.
I suggest that you use the polarity guard. Option 1.

I assume you're the person that posted to the ATCA #2 listserv about this topic and received two stupid answers from members who obviously didn't know what they were talking about. No surprise there!

Stan S.

Offline stub

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Re: Components Needed to Build Stand-Alone Touch-Tone Keypad
« Reply #21 on: November 17, 2016, 11:27:23 PM »
Stan S ,
            THANK YOU, SIR for writing and posting the article "  Wiring A Touch Tone Pad To Any Antique Telephone" These are so easy, I can't understand why everyone didn't build them. They work great with all my Automatic Electric , Kellogg , WE 500's.  The hardest part is finding the box to mount the keypad in. Thanks again Stan !!!!!!!!!   stub
Kenneth Stubblefield        
  CRPF
   TCI

Offline Stan S

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Re: Components Needed to Build Stand-Alone Touch-Tone Keypad
« Reply #22 on: November 18, 2016, 08:10:20 AM »
Kenneth
You're welcome.
A lot of folks built those pads.
 
You are correct about the case being the hardest part of that project to find. The one I used in the article was made for a keypad. Unfortunately, they are expensive and not that easy to find. Not really a part sold to hobbyists.

I haven't checked but it's possible that Adafruit or Sparkfun Electronics might be selling a case that will do the job. Both are Internet based companies and sell to hobbyists.

Stan S.

Offline cornell9

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Re: Components Needed to Build Stand-Alone Touch-Tone Keypad
« Reply #23 on: November 18, 2016, 07:23:41 PM »
Thanks Stan and stub, I confirmed with my multimeter that it is a 330 ohm resistor.  I moved the wiring around as you suggested but am still having the same issue where the phone works but the dial pad does not produce any tones when pressing the buttons.

Is the wiring in my new photos below correct?  If so, maybe the dial is bad?  No buttons are recognized.

If my 72 dial turns out bad I also acquired a Ceeco 700 or 730-ANS type dial with metal buttons, like this photo:  http://www.ceeco.net/keypads-dials-c-4_17/730ans-p-181

The colors of the Ceeco wires are different (white, white-green, white-yellow, red-green, orange-black, gray, and white-black) but I'm hoping I can maybe use the Ceeco dial as well as a touch tone pad if I can figure out the equivalent wires to the 72 pad.  Does anyone have a schematic or wiring recommendations for a Ceeco for this dial pad project?


Offline cornell9

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Re: Components Needed to Build Stand-Alone Touch-Tone Keypad
« Reply #24 on: November 25, 2016, 02:55:40 PM »
Thanks stub your dial worked perfectly!  I guess my WE 72 dial was broken.

Does anyone know the equivalent colors for the Ceeco dial wires from the link in my previous post?  I'd like to make a second standalone touch tone keypad.

Offline Stan S

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Re: Components Needed to Build Stand-Alone Touch-Tone Keypad
« Reply #25 on: November 25, 2016, 03:40:34 PM »
Glad to hear you built a pad that worked.

If the Ceeco pad you want to use has 4 discreet diodes or a diode bridge, just connect the AC side of the bridge across the 330 ohm resistor. There are probably two wires (or terminals on the board) connected to those points already. 

Stan S.

Offline stub

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Re: Components Needed to Build Stand-Alone Touch-Tone Keypad
« Reply #26 on: November 25, 2016, 04:37:08 PM »
 cornell9,
              Your welcome !!!!   stub
Kenneth Stubblefield        
  CRPF
   TCI

Offline cornell9

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Re: Components Needed to Build Stand-Alone Touch-Tone Keypad
« Reply #27 on: November 26, 2016, 11:00:07 PM »
Thanks Stan, poplar1, and stub!  I finished one of the two dial projects - the Ceeco inside the CableWholesale ABCD 4 Way Switch Box, RJ11/RJ12.  All is working now!  The switch box allows me to use the dial with different phones physically connected to the box but only one phone rings/is used at a time.  And I can switch it to an unused dial position to turn off the ring/the phone.

The only required wiring modification to the switch box wiring is to cut the third wire from the right as shown.  One end connects to the 330 ohm resistor which connects to the orange-black wire.  The other cut end of the switch box wire connects to the red-green wire of the Ceeco.  The white-green and white wires of the Ceeco pad are connected and the remaining wires are unused/taped off.

I've also attached photos of the wiring for the ITT pad for those who want the dial to be standalone.  This one is still a work in progress and I need to re-strip one of the red modular jack wires as shown.  Thanks to stub for the dial, the wiring, and the clear instructions on this dial (the last two photos)!
« Last Edit: November 26, 2016, 11:11:04 PM by cornell9 »