Author Topic: Hi from Ireland  (Read 5662 times)

Offline twocvbloke

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Re: Hi from Ireland
« Reply #15 on: March 20, 2015, 07:18:43 PM »
The term "Boot" came from ye olde days when horses pulled carriages about, and the driver would have a set of boots to wear for muddy conditions, and he would keep them in the back in what they called a "boot locker", and when the automocar came along the term carried over to the rear stowage (and yes, they used wood & leather trunks as the storage for most of the cars that didn't actually have a rear compartment, but they were removable trunks usually), so the back of a car (or front if you had a Skoda Estelle or VW Beetle) was forever to be called the Boot, at least here in blighty... :)

Offline patcorr

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Re: Hi from Ireland
« Reply #16 on: March 25, 2015, 01:54:43 PM »
The term "Boot" came from ye olde days when horses pulled carriages about, and the driver would have a set of boots to wear for muddy conditions, and he would keep them in the back in what they called a "boot locker", and when the automocar came along the term carried over to the rear stowage (and yes, they used wood & leather trunks as the storage for most of the cars that didn't actually have a rear compartment, but they were removable trunks usually), so the back of a car (or front if you had a Skoda Estelle or VW Beetle) was forever to be called the Boot, at least here in blighty... :)

I often wondered about that twocvbloke, makes a lot of sense. I guess we forget that people have different names for things outside Ireland and Blighty  :)

Offline twocvbloke

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Re: Hi from Ireland
« Reply #17 on: March 25, 2015, 02:19:19 PM »
Yep, my friend over in Texas and I are often making jokes about the differences between our two "english" languages, be it the differences in using entirely different words like Faucet versus Tap, or Trunk versus Boot, or the little differences like carburettor versus carburetor & aluminium versus aluminum, we both speak english, but they're entirely different languages... ;D

Offline 19and41

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Re: Hi from Ireland
« Reply #18 on: March 25, 2015, 03:00:45 PM »
Here is the reason we in the US refer to the rear storage as a trunk.  That for a while was what it was...  http://aries-restoration.com/images/1930%20Lincoln/rear_trunk.jpg  I think I have a pretty good working knowledge of English english, thanks to the adroit tutelage of the performers in 55 years worth of British and Irish television programming presented here in the states.   :)
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Offline WEBellSystemChristian

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Re: Hi from Ireland
« Reply #19 on: March 25, 2015, 03:22:06 PM »
I watch Youtube videos by a guy who lives in Ireland, and I'm starting to catch myself using Irish and general European terms, or pronouncing things the European way. At first I wondered why I was, then I did the math. I listen to and watch an Irishman for 10-15 minutes per video, two videos a day, every day for the past year or so. ;D
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Offline patcorr

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Re: Hi from Ireland
« Reply #20 on: March 26, 2015, 11:35:28 AM »
I watch Youtube videos by a guy who lives in Ireland, and I'm starting to catch myself using Irish and general European terms, or pronouncing things the European way. At first I wondered why I was, then I did the math. I listen to and watch an Irishman for 10-15 minutes per video, two videos a day, every day for the past year or so. ;D

It can be quite contagious, depending of course what accent you listen to. IN Ireland the Dublin or Cork accent can be strong, while where I am in Kilkenny would be classed as flat. We find it hard to understand other Irish people too! and the same goes for Britain with the Liverpool, Newcastle and London accents being at completely different ends of the spectrum!
I know a young child of about 4 years of age that speaks with an American accent because they spend so much time in front of the television!!!!!

Offline twocvbloke

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Re: Hi from Ireland
« Reply #21 on: March 26, 2015, 12:15:29 PM »
I've been watching canadians on Youtube for a few years now, and I've been catching myself talking like a canadian eh, though I've yet to find a hortons for some coffee and timbits after a visit to Canadian Tire...  ;D

Offline patcorr

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Re: Hi from Ireland
« Reply #22 on: March 26, 2015, 08:06:31 PM »
I was reading a few articles recently online about the American English and British English/Received Pronunciation, it is becoming so assimilated now that we tend to mix and match. Microsoft Word etc has been partially to blame for this I think as it defaults to American English.

Offline NorthernElectric

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Re: Hi from Ireland
« Reply #23 on: March 27, 2015, 07:40:47 PM »
...though I've yet to find a hortons for some coffee and timbits after a visit to Canadian Tire...  ;D

You didn't miss much.

Canadian Tire used to be a great place that I would make a weekly pilgrimage to.  It was a manly store.  Now it's half full of 'housewares', cleaning products, small appliances, and other stuff designed to compete with the big box stores and attract shoppers of both genders.  They even have shopping carts now.  Now I only go there when I absolutely need something that they might have, although that often means ordering it in and coming back if it's automotive parts.  They still have Canadian Tire money, but they are trying to switch everyone into signing up for a 'points card' so they can do away with it and save all of your purchase history in a database.

Tim Horton's used to be a great place.  Now the doughnuts come in frozen on a truck instead of being made at the store fresh daily.  Not quite the same.  And they serve other food now, which slows things down tremendously.  You can expect a lengthy wait at most locations.  McDonalds has better coffee these days.  I would never go there anymore if it weren't for receiving the occasional Tim card as a gift, and even then I only go to a couple of locations that don't seem to be as busy as most.

How aboot that , eh.

 ;D
« Last Edit: March 27, 2015, 07:59:42 PM by NorthernElectric »
Cliff

Offline twocvbloke

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Re: Hi from Ireland
« Reply #24 on: March 28, 2015, 02:33:19 AM »
I've heard about the issues with the Hortons having long queues due to people ordering food and the staff not exactly able to cope with such a task, and the coffee recipe changing and apparently Mcdullards have got what used to be the Hortons' coffee recipe, but personally I dislike mcdullards since my last visit to one in 2011, vile offerings which I would rather let other people have!!! :o

The CT money is a funny one, it looks like Monopoly money to me from what I've seen on various vlogs, all brightly coloured and "fake looking", but it's an actual thing which seems quite fun... ;D

How aboot that , eh.

 ;D

I know, eh?  ;D

Offline AE_Collector

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Re: Hi from Ireland
« Reply #25 on: March 28, 2015, 01:04:46 PM »
I don't mind an occasional visit to Tim's, usually with my wife for a quick lunch or dinner quite often while on the road. I do almost always find myself trying to solve the slow moving line problem for them while waiting though!

Ever since McD's changed to a place your order and pay then someone else will put your order together while you stand to the side and wait for it....I find the front area frequently can be chaos not knowing which is a line to order and which is people milling about waiting for food. I bet it works better in UK (if they use this system) where people know how to "que up" but in North America we prefer to stand all over the place causing nothing but confusion.

Terry

Offline twocvbloke

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Re: Hi from Ireland
« Reply #26 on: March 28, 2015, 01:10:31 PM »
We're gradually getting the "Order & pay here, wait for your order over there" thing too, KFC does it, not sure of McD's cos I've not been to one recently, but, yeah, we're good at being orderly with queueing, it's almost a national sport it's so popular to be orderly in a queue... ;D