Author Topic: Clear Message (Phone Padlock)  (Read 5841 times)

Offline WEBellSystemChristian

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Clear Message (Phone Padlock)
« on: April 17, 2015, 11:43:13 PM »
I can understand someone's reason for not allowing courtesy calls on their home phone line, but this guy took that understanding to another level...

http://www.ebay.com/itm/331532738479

It reminds me of the dial locks from the 1930s!
« Last Edit: April 20, 2015, 10:30:31 AM by Sargeguy »
Christian Petterson

"Whether you think you can or think you can't, you're right" -Henry Ford

Offline twocvbloke

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Re: Clear Message
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2015, 12:03:50 AM »
Useful if the person you're calling is at 111-111-1111... ;D

Offline Matilo Telephones

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Re: Clear Message
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2015, 04:08:37 AM »
Is that an unkown item, across the pond? Here they were very common. There were even phones with built in locks to prevent dialing.

Here are some pics of my small collection of dial locks.
Groeten,

Arwin

Check out my telephone website: http://www.matilo.eu/?lang=en

And I am on facebook too: www.facebook.com/matilosvintagetelephones

Offline WEBellSystemChristian

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Re: Clear Message
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2015, 08:12:32 AM »
Is that an unkown item, across the pond? Here they were very common. There were even phones with built in locks to prevent dialing.

Here are some pics of my small collection of dial locks.
I've seen a few Professional dial locks on phones built in the 1930s and 1940s, and one or two modern ones in boxes, but I have never seen one in use past the 40s or 50s.

I know that's a Master Lock, extremely, extremely common here, but the fact that it was used to prevent dialing on a phone is what I was reffering to. Actual dial locks aren't common here.
Christian Petterson

"Whether you think you can or think you can't, you're right" -Henry Ford

Offline savageje

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Re: Clear Message
« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2015, 11:48:17 AM »
I've seen dial locks before and they are neat curiosity, but what kind of application would these be used for?  I can see public area phones that are used infrequently for official purposes, but for a private home or an area where the phone was used frequently, they seem like they would be a huge hassle.

Offline compubit

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Re: Clear Message
« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2015, 12:50:59 PM »
Some uses:

- Kids are grounded from using the phone
- Don't want babysitter making calls all night
- Party at the house - to prevent long distance calls
- Phones in public areas
- Phone meant to be answer only - and a basic dial phone was cheaper than a manual phone (don't think Ma Bell or the local independent company wouldn't figure how to charge you extra for anything special...)

Of course, kids can quickly figure out how to "dial" using the switch hook...
A phone phanatic since I was less than 2 (thanks to Fisher Price); collector since a teenager; now able to afford to play!
Favorite Phone: Western Electric Trimline - it just feels right holding it up to my face!

Offline WesternElectricBen

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Re: Clear Message
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2015, 01:08:29 PM »
I think I could cut that lock with my safety-scissors. :)

Ben

Offline mariepr

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Re: Clear Message
« Reply #7 on: April 19, 2015, 12:29:06 AM »
It won't stop "switch hook pulsing"!  ;)

Offline twocvbloke

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Re: Clear Message
« Reply #8 on: April 19, 2015, 01:17:04 AM »
Tap 10 times to call the Operator... ;D

Offline Jack Ryan

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Re: Clear Message
« Reply #9 on: April 19, 2015, 01:59:34 AM »
I haven't seen many locks for dials used in Australia but a telephone with a key-lock was available for most of the time the PMG/Telecom/Telstra was a monopoly provider. Early auto versions could be circumvented by hook tapping but there was also a module that could be added to the telephone that would dampen the hook making it impossible to "flash dial".

There was also a small box with a key lock that could be added to a PABX so that outside lines could be switched off after hours and on weekends. The box had a glass front and a spare key inside so that in an emergency, one would break the glass, get the spare key, switch on an outside line and call for help. If the glass was broken and there was no emergency you probably wouldn't get another chance.

Jack

unbeldi

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Re: Clear Message
« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2015, 09:12:07 AM »
It won't stop "switch hook pulsing"!  ;)

Tap 10 times to call the Operator... ;D

In countries that used these types of locks, some telephones also had specially designed slow hookswitches that prevented such practices.

Offline savageje

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Re: Clear Message
« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2015, 09:17:56 AM »
Gary Goff's cover story on this month's TCI newsletter is about early coin mechanisms for candlestick phones. While not exactly the same thing, they were essentially much more elaborate versions of the simple key-operated dial lock. It is worth a read if you have not seen it already.

Offline 19and41

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Re: Clear Message
« Reply #12 on: April 19, 2015, 10:01:25 AM »
I remember those locks from the early '60s, about the same time frame as the pens with the plastic ball on one end to dial the phone to minimize ladies' nail damage to or from the dial.
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Offline compubit

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Re: Clear Message
« Reply #13 on: April 19, 2015, 10:39:52 AM »
I remember those locks from the early '60s, about the same time frame as the pens with the plastic ball on one end to dial the phone to minimize ladies' nail damage to or from the dial.

God forbid if the lady with th 3 inch nails is inconvenienced having to dial a phone. I still don't know how these secretaries typed on a typewriter with 3" nails... (Of course some had something on someone, so they could get away with nearly anything...)

Jim
A phone phanatic since I was less than 2 (thanks to Fisher Price); collector since a teenager; now able to afford to play!
Favorite Phone: Western Electric Trimline - it just feels right holding it up to my face!

Offline savageje

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Re: Clear Message (Phone Padlock)
« Reply #14 on: April 20, 2015, 10:56:33 AM »
God forbid if the lady with th 3 inch nails is inconvenienced having to dial a phone. I still don't know how these secretaries typed on a typewriter with 3" nails... (Of course some had something on someone, so they could get away with nearly anything...)

Ha!  I've worked with a few of those over the years.  To this day, the sound of those long Freddy Krueger nails clicking away on a keyboard drives me batty.