Author Topic: Unknown Candlestick Phone  (Read 1458 times)

Offline Nuke

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Unknown Candlestick Phone
« on: August 26, 2015, 09:34:13 PM »
Greetings -

I recently picked this phone up at an estate sale minus the receiver. Can anyone recognize this? Thanks

Offline wds

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Re: Unknown Candlestick Phone
« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2015, 09:47:38 PM »
Kellogg, 1899 I think.  Very nice!  Are you going to keep it or sell it? 
Dave

Offline Nuke

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Re: Unknown Candlestick Phone
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2015, 10:34:34 PM »
Thank you for your quick reply. Not sure what I am going to do with it. I think I would like to find a receiver for it first. From what I can tell it is an OST. This is my first candlestick phone and I find them very interesting. I am thinking about buying more. It may soon be another addiction !

Offline G-Man

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Re: Unknown Candlestick Phone
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2015, 11:32:23 PM »
Congratulations to WDS for being able to i.d. it from a single photograph taken from a limited perspective. Here is another photo that was excerpted from the TCI Library.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2015, 07:09:06 AM by G-Man »

Offline LarryInMichigan

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Re: Unknown Candlestick Phone
« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2015, 09:18:45 AM »
Thank you for your quick reply. Not sure what I am going to do with it. I think I would like to find a receiver for it first. From what I can tell it is an OST. This is my first candlestick phone and I find them very interesting. I am thinking about buying more. It may soon be another addiction !

This is certainly quite a way to start!  This phone has to worth a serious amount.  Good luck on your future finds.


Larry

Offline Nuke

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Re: Unknown Candlestick Phone
« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2015, 08:03:43 PM »
Yeah - I don't know what it is worth. But I want to find a receiver for it. Based on the pictures it seems an external terminal receiver does not go with it.

Offline HarrySmith

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Re: Unknown Candlestick Phone
« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2015, 09:35:19 PM »
Thank you for your quick reply. Not sure what I am going to do with it. I think I would like to find a receiver for it first. From what I can tell it is an OST. This is my first candlestick phone and I find them very interesting. I am thinking about buying more. It may soon be another addiction !

Nice find! As far as becoming an addiction it is too late! You are firmly in the grasp of Phoneitis. It is progressive and incurable. Soon you will be needing more room for your collection!
Harry Smith
ATCA 4434
TCI

"There is no try,
there is only
do or do not"

Offline Nuke

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Re: Unknown Candlestick Phone
« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2015, 04:27:32 PM »
Anybody know where I can get a wiring diagram for this phone with the intent of making it work?

unbeldi

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Re: Unknown Candlestick Phone
« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2015, 06:11:16 PM »
A candlestick like this is very simple.

I just took someone through this, HERE, and the principle for you would be the same. You can perhaps even use the identical diagrams.

However, first you do need to determine whether your transmitter is for local battery service of for common battery service.   A local battery (LB) telephone uses a battery at the substation to power the transmitter.  LB transmitters have especially low resistance to avoid wasting battery energy.  I believe the early Kellogg transmitters for local battery, have an óL suffix with the type number.  Are there any markings on the transmitter?   Of course you also need to determine if the transmitter is even functional anymore, same applies to the receiver.

Oh, did it even come with a receiver?  No, it didn't, I see. So you need to find one.  They made several versions at the time, 6-A, 8-A, 12-A.

You also need to examine the hookswitch contacts, just like in that thread I quoted.

In addition to the desk stand, you need an induction coil and a condenser, both typically contained in a box at the wall near the desk.  Kellogg also had the induction coil mounted separately on a wooden connection board early on, and used a separate ringer and generator box.

« Last Edit: September 06, 2015, 06:21:31 PM by unbeldi »