Author Topic: Wood wall phone battery  (Read 2329 times)

Offline rockola1436

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Wood wall phone battery
« on: November 05, 2015, 09:10:29 PM »
HI guys--what battery are you folks using for your wood we317 phones I'm not worried about looking original just want to connect two 317s to work together
thanks GARY

Online Jim Stettler

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Re: Wood wall phone battery
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2015, 10:06:42 PM »
The original batteries were #6 dry cells which are only 1.5 volt each which is the same as  AA, AAA, C, and D batteries. I think most folks use D cells. 
Jim S.
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Offline rockola1436

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Re: Wood wall phone battery
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2015, 10:08:12 PM »
thank you Jim

unbeldi

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Re: Wood wall phone battery
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2015, 08:41:10 AM »
Typically the No. 6 batteries were used in sets of three in a battery box:



Make sure you use at least two cells in series, one may produce current that is too small for effective operation, the resistance of old transmitters is usually not optimal anymore. On the other hand, we don't have to cover miles of rural lines in  a demonstration of two local battery phones, so a smaller current will suffice.

There are many discussions of batteries on the forum here, the search function should produce them.

No 6 batteries can actually still be bought new from a few places, but they are expensive.  Some people even print the wrappers to make them look original. Others have created mock-up types with C or D cells, or even rechargeable cells inside.

Finally, an old cell phone charger that outputs approximately 5 V DC should be a good replacement and ample in availability. Some or most of these are well filtered and don't produce a hum.


Offline rockola1436

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Re: Wood wall phone battery
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2015, 10:12:51 AM »
That's great info thank you
GARY

unbeldi

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Re: Wood wall phone battery
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2015, 01:23:41 PM »
Here is a Western Electric specimen of a No. 6 battery in my collection:



KS 6542.
American Standard Type No. 6

These weigh almost 1 kilogram.
« Last Edit: November 06, 2015, 01:27:09 PM by unbeldi »

Offline DavePEI

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Re: Wood wall phone battery
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2015, 01:43:05 PM »
Regarding the mention below by Unbeldi of the use of a charger to power these phones - your best bet is to find one from 3-5 volts, and make sure the one you get is a switching supply - the older Motorola flip phone era switch mode chargers are what I use.

You will need one charger per phone. Each charger cord should have the original mating charger plug designed to fasten to the cell phone removed.

If using a charger, you need to tie the sampling lead to the positive output of the charger for most of them (in the Motorola ones I use, that is the white lead which ties to the red lead) - you will find the cable includes 3 leads, the neg, pos, and sampling lead. The advantage of switch mode chargers is any hum you might get out of them is above or at the top of the human listening range (i.e., you might hear a slight hissing if you have very good hearing and a very sensitive receiver).

I use them on all my magneto sets, and even to power my 1240 switchboard talk battery. The advantage of using the switching supplies over traditional wall warts with only a rectifier and capacitor, is all of the older supplies put out enough 60 cycle hum to be objectionable when used as a talk battery.

The switching ones do, too, but above our hearing range.

Why do I use these? Because zinc-carbon batteries do not over-winter well, and since I have changed to the chargers, it has saved me a fortune in annual replacements.

Also, i do have a number of metal battery cases available for magneto sets. Contact me for details.

Below a photo of some of the supplies operating Mag. sets in the Museum, and below that, several of the Motorola chargers I find work well.

Dave
« Last Edit: November 06, 2015, 02:45:27 PM by DavePEI »
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Offline rockola1436

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Re: Wood wall phone battery
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2015, 07:22:00 PM »
Thank you all so much --DAVE that wall wart idea is fantastic
 I was thinking of using 4 d cells in a series-parallel configuration in each phone.
but now I may look for a wall wart
thanks again Gary

Offline Dan/Panther

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Re: Wood wall phone battery
« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2015, 06:56:12 PM »
The wall wart idea with a dummy battery would be great.
D/P

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Offline rockola1436

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Re: Wood wall phone battery
« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2016, 10:51:54 PM »

Online Jim Stettler

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Re: Wood wall phone battery
« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2016, 09:52:52 AM »
You used to be able to order the standard "number 6" dry cells from Radio shack. They were still being made in China.

Some collectors were  offering there own "Number 6" by putting "D" cells in a piece of PVC with a battery label on the tube.
Jim S.
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You die, you forget it all.

Offline Ktownphoneco

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Re: Wood wall phone battery
« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2016, 11:34:07 AM »
I make these "fake" batteries using cardboard mailing tubes which are the closest in diameter to the genuine old batteries.    My first choice was a PVC or ABS pipe, but I couldn't find a size that was close to the that of the original batteries.       However there is a web site "RadiolaGuy.com" that sells reproduction battery labels, and has instructions for making the the batteries, both with and without "C" cell flashlight batteries.

Here's the link  :   https://www.radiolaguy.com/Batteries/Vintage_Batteries.htm

Mine were made strictly for looks.    There's no batteries inside.    Picture below.   
Enjoy the rest of the day.

Jeff Lamb

Offline TelePlay

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Re: Wood wall phone battery
« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2016, 11:43:46 AM »
Jeff, I knew of that site but didn't have it bookmarked. Here's the link directly to his "make your own" instructions.

http://www.radiolaguy.com/Batteries/Create%20a%20replica%20No.%206%20A%20cell%20battery.htm

RadiolaGuy used to sell completed batteries but seems to have stopped that part of his business for some reason at least a year or so ago.

I did find this site which does sell completed replacement batteries, renewable (battery replacement) and rechargeable. Pricey, to be sure, but save the time and hassle of making one, and generic labels.

http://www.kensclockclinic.com/catalog/batteries/
            John . . .

              

Offline Ktownphoneco

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Re: Wood wall phone battery
« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2016, 12:08:19 PM »
Thanks John   ....    I haven't seen that web site before.    Yes, they're pricey for sure, but if someone really wants replacements that work, this is a place to buy them.     

I haven't tried this myself, but I could drill a small hole near the base, and at the back of one of my own batteries, and just before the top or bottom goes on, cut the tip off a wal-wart DC power supply, use a volt meter to identify the positive / negative outputs, and solder the end of the positive lead to the center terminal of the "fake" battery, the negative to the outer terminal of the battery, then finish the assembly of the "fake" battery, and it would then be a working battery.    The other 2 "fakes" could have the terminals jumpered inside during assembly, and the "live battery could have one lead going to one of the 317's battery terminals, while the remaining terminal on the live battery is routed through the remaining 2 fakes, with the last terminal on the 3rd battery connected to the remaining 317 battery terminal.    The finished product would give the impression that all 3 batteries are driving the set's talk circuits.

I was talking to the "Sonny", the "RadiolaGuy" and he told me he was just getting too swamped with requests for working reproduction batteries, and had to stop offering the service.     I sent him a high resolution scan of a Northern battery, which he cleaned up and put on his web site, and that's how I ended up discussing batteries with him.

Jeff
   

Jeff

Offline MagnetoDave

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Source for EN6 - Blue Bell KS 6542 batteries
« Reply #14 on: January 09, 2019, 01:48:08 AM »
No 6 batteries can actually still be bought new from a few places, but they are expensive.  Some people even print the wrappers to make them look original. Others have created mock-up types with C or D cells, or even rechargeable cells inside.

I did some searching around, and found an equivalent: Exell Battery EBR40 Type R40 1.5V Battery EN6.
It's a direct replacement for a Number 6 battery, such as the Blue Bell KS 6542.
Purchase from: Wal-Mart or Amazon.com

Price is about $25 per cell.

Appropriate Fahnestock Clips can also be purchased new from several sources, such as Amazon.com

=============================

Web Site Description:

Exell Battery EB-R40, Type R40 1.5V battery is a direct replacement for the Energizer EN6, Eveready No. 6 or Rayovac Number 6

The No. 6 battery was largely popular staring around 1950. They were first used in 1893 for ignition of explosive engines. They are used in many applications such as self winding clocks, navigation mark, radios, communication equipment, lanterns, SPC telephone, railway lighting lamps, coal mining and more.

The EB-R40 is ideal for low voltage, high-power demand applications. The have long shelf life and not subject to leaking. They are great as an emergency power supply

Be sure to add on Fahnestock Clips for your school science experiments, hobby application, antique toy trains and special application. The fahnestock clips make it easy to connect bare wire to the battery safely and easily.

Exell Batteries not only provide consumers with high efficiency, long-lasting performance, they also function as replacement batteries for an array of common and unique applications. Ranging from vintage camera equipment to sophisticated medical testing equipment, Exell Batteries can meet the needs of all consumers.

Specifications
Brand: Exell
Rechargeable: No
Output Voltage: 1.5V
Amperage: 40000mAh
Chemistry: Carbon Zinc
Length: 5.83"
Width: 2.44"
Country of Manufacture: China

Compatibility
Blue Grass: EBG 46, EBG 96
BlueBell: KS 6542
Bond: No. 6
Burgess: No. 6
Columbia: No. 6
Energizer: EN6
Eveready: 7111, Number 6
Everegreen: HR-40
Franco: No. 6
French: No. 6
General: No. 6
Hercules: No. 6
Interstate Battery: DRY1725
Philco: No. 6
Rayovac: No.6
Royal: No. 6
Winchester: W 6
Zenith: No. 6
« Last Edit: January 09, 2019, 06:51:34 PM by TelePlay »