Author Topic: IV36 302 on eBay  (Read 3262 times)

Offline poplar1

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Re: IV36 302 on eBay
« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2016, 11:49:01 PM »
Here is another 101A IND without markings stamped on top, in a 302 assembled in I 37. It was Auction Contest #160.
http://www.classicrotaryphones.com/forum/index.php?topic=13433.msg140541#msg140541
"C'est pas une restauration, c'est une rénovation."--François Martin.

unbeldi

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Re: IV36 302 on eBay
« Reply #16 on: April 08, 2016, 08:10:42 AM »
Just like the use of certain 'researched' central office names was recommended centrally by AT&T/BTL in 1955, they could only recommend the use of 8000 and 9000 number blocks for coin lines. The Notes on Distance Dialing specifically recommend the 9- and 8-thousand (when needed) blocks to be set aside for such purposes with the goal that operators don't even have to check manually for coin services.  The Notes also stated that in the larger Bell and independent areas this was already practiced.
I seem to recall a mention that on the average a 10,000 line office had only a fraction of numbers actually used, so that setting aside one block would not constrain the local numbering plan much, which seems about right, because in the 1950s there were still thousands of offices that didn't even use a 2-5 numbering plan, but something considerably smaller, such as 2-4 or even 1-4.

So, no it is not a certainty, but something to keep in mind.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2016, 09:18:16 AM by unbeldi »

Offline poplar1

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Re: IV36 302 on eBay
« Reply #17 on: April 08, 2016, 11:30:31 AM »
I don't have access to Notes on Distance Dialing at this time. However, 9xxx could still be "first choice" for coin lines, without being exclusive of other classes of service. I seem to recall on more than one occasion the operator asking me "Is that a coin phone?" when I was making a collect call to a residential line ending in 9xxx. By assigning all coin phones to 9xxx, this would usually mean the operator wouldn't have to "check for coin" say for a call to a NNX-2xxx line.

If all coin lines are 9xxx, then all 9xxx are not necessarily coin lines. Our next door neighbor's number (1FR) was
404 766-9012.

Stan or Jim could possibly add comments on why coin lines needed to be assigned numbers in the same block, at least in Step-by-step offices. Step offices did not have the same numbering flexibility as Crossbar or ESS. Hunt groups in SxS had to be sequential numbers 377-2411 through 2440 for example (Emory Univ. 701B PBX. Agnes Scott College was 373-2571 or FREAKS 1.) In 5XB offices the other members of a hunt group could be random numbers.

Reserving four thousand 9xxx numbers in our local SxS (POplar 1-, 2-, 6- and 7-) would have required creating the new 768 (1ESS) and 763 offices even sooner than was otherwise necessary (1972). This meant not just soft numbers but additional equipment.

The 25 Auburn Bldg. in Atlanta, built in 1916, was still in service in the mid-70s with 3 step offices (523-, 524-, 525-). All the other lines downtown were served by 5XB or ESS. Even though presumably new subscribers had been assigned 5XB or ESS lines for some time, there were still about 15,000 (out of less than 30K max.) subscribed lines at 25 Auburn on cutover day, according to Nelson Crist, the foreman. (He told me he had never seen the inside of an ESS c.o.)
« Last Edit: April 08, 2016, 11:51:47 AM by poplar1 »
"C'est pas une restauration, c'est une rénovation."--François Martin.

Offline Tim Mc

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Re: IV36 302 on eBay
« Reply #18 on: June 22, 2016, 02:25:24 PM »
Looks like this one is back up for auction.  I have an I-37 302 and the induction coil has an I-37 date on the side of the coil, which is hard to see without removing it.  Also, I believe the terminal screws should be brass.

Offline andre_janew

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Re: IV36 302 on eBay
« Reply #19 on: June 22, 2016, 06:45:15 PM »
He's reduced the starting price to $535.  Still hasn't  had a bid on it yet!

Offline TelePlay

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Re: IV36 302 on eBay
« Reply #20 on: June 24, 2016, 08:50:24 AM »
He's reduced the starting price to $535.  Still hasn't  had a bid on it yet!

It was relisted more than few times starting at $675 and going down a bit with each re-list. The last listing, which was ended by the seller due to "an error in the listing," was at $525. Looks like it may have had a BIN of $715.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/-/252392239255?
            John . . .

              

Alex G. Bell

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Re: Assignment of 9xxx numbers to coin lines (was: IV36 302 on eBay)
« Reply #21 on: January 23, 2017, 08:40:20 AM »
Coin lines were assigned to the 9000 block (and 8000 too if necessary) so that operators could easily identify potential attempts to place collect calls to a coin station, demanding deposits from the answering party.

In COs of any size (with >10,000 lines i.e. multiple office codes) coin features and party line features were usually equipped on only one of the switches for reasons of equipment economy.  Consequently the other offices in the same CO building had 9xxx numbers available which did not have coin features which were assigned to ordinary customer lines.  The one switch with coin and party line features served all coin and party lines.

I grew up with a 9000 series number on one of the non-coin units served from a building with 6 office codes.   Whenever I attempted to call home collect the operator would challenge with: "is that a coinbox/paystation?" because of the 9000 number.  If in doubt about the truthfulness of what the caller said she would have to call "Rate & Route" to determine whether the called office code served coin lines.

I don't have access to Notes on Distance Dialing at this time. However, 9xxx could still be "first choice" for coin lines, without being exclusive of other classes of service. I seem to recall on more than one occasion the operator asking me "Is that a coin phone?" when I was making a collect call to a residential line ending in 9xxx. By assigning all coin phones to 9xxx, this would usually mean the operator wouldn't have to "check for coin" say for a call to a NNX-2xxx line.

If all coin lines are 9xxx, then all 9xxx are not necessarily coin lines. Our next door neighbor's number (1FR) was
404 766-9012.

Stan or Jim could possibly add comments on why coin lines needed to be assigned numbers in the same block, at least in Step-by-step offices. Step offices did not have the same numbering flexibility as Crossbar or ESS. Hunt groups in SxS had to be sequential numbers 377-2411 through 2440 for example (Emory Univ. 701B PBX. Agnes Scott College was 373-2571 or FREAKS 1.) In 5XB offices the other members of a hunt group could be random numbers.

Reserving four thousand 9xxx numbers in our local SxS (POplar 1-, 2-, 6- and 7-) would have required creating the new 768 (1ESS) and 763 offices even sooner than was otherwise necessary (1972). This meant not just soft numbers but additional equipment.

The 25 Auburn Bldg. in Atlanta, built in 1916, was still in service in the mid-70s with 3 step offices (523-, 524-, 525-). All the other lines downtown were served by 5XB or ESS. Even though presumably new subscribers had been assigned 5XB or ESS lines for some time, there were still about 15,000 (out of less than 30K max.) subscribed lines at 25 Auburn on cutover day, according to Nelson Crist, the foreman. (He told me he had never seen the inside of an ESS c.o.)