Author Topic: My new mystery phone. Broadcast desk?  (Read 1333 times)

Offline dsk

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My new mystery phone. Broadcast desk?
« on: October 30, 2009, 11:59:17 AM »
This one has probably been used by NRK (the Norwegian Broadcasting System )
I do'nt know almoast nothing about it. The handset is obviously newer than the phone, and is a handset from a 1953 model.
 


Ideas?

dsk

I have even got a regular New York number :-) 646 570 1796

Offline McHeath

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Re: My new mystery phone. Broadcast desk?
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2009, 10:47:15 PM »
Looks like a custom job to me.  Probably from the 50's or 60's, that handset resembles a Western Electric F1 series.  Once in a while I run across phones here in the USA that are odd like this, and seem to be something that was constructed for a specific niche market. 

Offline Phonesrfun

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Re: My new mystery phone. Broadcast desk?
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2009, 10:55:39 PM »
I would say that the 1950's handset does go with the time period of the electronic and electro mechanical components inside.  I have no idea of what it was ever supposed to be used for, but the time period of the insides and the construction do shout "1950's"!

If it was used in a broadcast station, it may have been in conjuction with some kind of control that needed both switching control and someone to talk to on the other end.  Kind of like a fancy dial intercom.

-Bill G

Offline GG

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Re: My new mystery phone. Broadcast desk?
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2011, 09:12:30 AM »


The handset is 1960s Telegrafverket (Norwegian Ericsson), with 100% certainty.  The dial is 1950s - early 60s Telegrafverket, also with 100% certainty.

The rest of the stuff going on inside, I'm going to have to think about further. 


Offline GG

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Re: My new mystery phone. Broadcast desk?
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2011, 06:40:34 PM »

The circuit board shown in your photo #5 appears to be a breadboard device that was custom built by hand.  The way to tell is that the circuit board contains a regular rectangular matrix of holes to enable someone to mount whatever components they choose, and wire them together under the board using point-to-point wiring (not printed circuit wiring).