Author Topic: Looking for more info on Type 26  (Read 576 times)

Offline BobDelGreco

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Looking for more info on Type 26
« on: July 06, 2017, 03:14:26 PM »
Hi,

I have this desk stand with a 26 marking and a 329 transmitter.  I honestly cannot remember when I got it or how much I paid.  I have been searching around for a while but have not found anything out about a type 26.  I see 20, 22, 20-xx , 40 ..

Anyone have any info?  Is it AE or WE?  Approximate dates?

Thank you!

Bob

Offline poplar1

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Re: Looking for more info on Type 26
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2017, 03:54:49 PM »
It is very similar to the Western Electric #22. Both "American Bell" and "329" are W.E. markings. However, the 329 is later than the rest of the phone. I believe this style "perch" (lug holder) was superseded by 1904 (20-B).
"C'est pas une restauration, c'est une rénovation."--François Martin.

Alex G. Bell

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Re: Looking for more info on Type 26
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2017, 03:55:45 PM »
Hi,

I have this desk stand with a 26 marking and a 329 transmitter.  I honestly cannot remember when I got it or how much I paid.  I have been searching around for a while but have not found anything out about a type 26.  I see 20, 22, 20-xx , 40 ..

Anyone have any info?  Is it AE or WE?  Approximate dates?

Thank you!

Bob
I don't see mention in the 1912 Bulletin Catalog.  We might learn something from inspecting the switchhook contact springs on the "rack" inside the tube.  If it's anything other than the usual 3 springs that would suggest a special purpose.

Offline BobDelGreco

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Re: Looking for more info on Type 26
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2017, 11:28:13 AM »
Hi,

Thanks for the replies.   

Is this what you are referring to on the rack inside?

If this is similar to the #22, would the #26 make it a special purpose?   What transmitter would be appropriate if the 329 is later than the rest of the phone?

Thanks again.


Alex G. Bell

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Re: Looking for more info on Type 26
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2017, 12:08:40 PM »
Hi,

Thanks for the replies.   

Is this what you are referring to on the rack inside?

If this is similar to the #22, would the #26 make it a special purpose?   What transmitter would be appropriate if the 329 is later than the rest of the phone?

Thanks again.
Yes, that's the common arrangement found on most desk stands. 

I don't know what makes it different nor what transmitter it originally had.

Offline Sargeguy

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Re: Looking for more info on Type 26
« Reply #5 on: July 27, 2017, 10:31:02 PM »
That's a weird one.  The TYPE 22 was phased out before 1912 and replaced by the 20-B.  Some phones with this style perch were 20-Bs.  This isn't necessarily a Bell System designation.  The parts for these were sold off to other manufacturers, including smaller telcos and electrical works.  It could also be a mistake, and the 6 was used instead of the 2 or 0.
Greg Sargeant
Providence, RI
TCI /ATCA #4409

Alex G. Bell

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Re: Looking for more info on Type 26
« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2017, 11:13:08 PM »
Hi,

Thanks for the replies.   

Is this what you are referring to on the rack inside?

If this is similar to the #22, would the #26 make it a special purpose?   What transmitter would be appropriate if the 329 is later than the rest of the phone?

Thanks again.
For starters, the 329 is an insulated transmitter with 2 lead connections required, normally through a hollow lug on the back of the cup and hollow perch.  The 229 was the uninsulated version.

From the rack photo it appears the hookswitch contact assembly is not insulated from the rack, so it would have used an uninsulated transmitter, perhaps a 229, with a single lead connection, probably through a hard rubber "grommet" (bushing) threaded into a hole in the back of the cup rather than through the lug, and probably had a solid lug and perch.  You didn't provide photos of any of these details.

To use it with a 329 and have it work one terminal of the 329 would need to have been connected to the body of the transmitter.  Was it?  If not, the 329 was just slapped on there to make it look complete.  If so, it could have been in service late enough to have been repaired in the field using the 329.

My recollection is hazy at the moment but IIRC, all 300 type transmitters are insulated but 200-types can be either insulated or not.  Or maybe all 200 types are uninsulated and 300 types can be either insulated or not.  Neither of these possibilities conflicts with the 329 being insulated and 229 not being.  I'll have to look up which is correct in reference material I compiled to be sure.  Regardless, the proper transmitter would be uninsulated.

I also have a listing of desk stand types which I will check to see whether it shows a 26.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2017, 11:16:44 PM by Alex G. Bell »

Offline poplar1

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Re: Looking for more info on Type 26
« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2017, 09:06:58 AM »
For starters, the 329 is an insulated transmitter with 2 lead connections required, normally through a hollow lug on the back of the cup and hollow perch.  The 229 was the uninsulated version.

From the rack photo it appears the hookswitch contact assembly is not insulated from the rack, so it would have used an uninsulated transmitter, perhaps a 229, with a single lead connection, probably through a hard rubber "grommet" (bushing) threaded into a hole in the back of the cup rather than through the lug, and probably had a solid lug and perch.  You didn't provide photos of any of these details.


See 3rd and 4th photos in the original post.
"C'est pas une restauration, c'est une rénovation."--François Martin.

Offline K1WI

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Re: Looking for more info on Type 26
« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2017, 10:55:20 AM »
The perch and contacts might have been replaced .
Western Electric microphones and railway equipment use some different numbers.  I have a 389W mike that's has a #26 perch and another that's says 48D . Have a few others with 7 , 7A , 44a and an odd ball marked 02AB.

Andy F.    K1WI
Andy F    K1WI

Alex G. Bell

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Re: Looking for more info on Type 26
« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2017, 12:12:30 PM »
The perch and contacts might have been replaced .
Western Electric microphones and railway equipment use some different numbers.  I have a 389W mike that's has a #26 perch and another that's says 48D . Have a few others with 7 , 7A , 44a and an odd ball marked 02AB.

Andy F.    K1WI
"02AB" or "20AB"?

Desk stands and transmitter arms have independent code series.  48D is the code of a "scissor" (extendable) transmitter arm consisting of a bracket for attaching to a wall or desk, scissor, receiver hook, transmitter and cup and cord.  It might be equipped with a 389W transmitter but IIRC, that's not the original factory equipped one for a 48D. 

The code marked on the ID plate riveted to the faceplate of a transmitter rarely if ever identifies the code which applies to the whole piece of equipment however it does include the transmitter mounting.  So two transmitter faceplate assemblies could be identical except for the marking on the ID tag because the mounting arrangements (cup and bracket if any) are different.

The marking on the perch normally identifies the code for the complete piece of equipment, hence 48-series codes would be found on the perch of a 48-type transmitter arm.

Alex G. Bell

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Re: Looking for more info on Type 26
« Reply #10 on: July 28, 2017, 12:15:44 PM »
See 3rd and 4th photos in the original post.
Thanks.  Missed that.  So the perch is solid and there is a single connecting lead.  Therefore it would useful to know whether the 2nd terminal of the 329 transmitter was connected to the frame to complete the circuit for the reasons I explained in my earlier reply.

Offline Sargeguy

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Re: Looking for more info on Type 26
« Reply #11 on: July 28, 2017, 09:18:38 PM »
Sometimes a jumper was used on insulated transmitters to bypass the insulation so that it functioned as an uninsulated transmitter.
Greg Sargeant
Providence, RI
TCI /ATCA #4409

Alex G. Bell

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Re: Looking for more info on Type 26
« Reply #12 on: July 28, 2017, 10:10:35 PM »
Sometimes a jumper was used on insulated transmitters to bypass the insulation so that it functioned as an uninsulated transmitter.
Right.  That's essentially what I said.  The point is that if it's there the phone may have been in service with the 329.  If it's not the transmitter was slapped in for display/sale.

Offline unbeldi

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Re: Looking for more info on Type 26
« Reply #13 on: July 29, 2017, 10:28:54 AM »
Here is a WECo illustration showing the installation of the Nos. 323 and 329 transmitters in single-wire and two-wire transmitter desk stands.

Offline poplar1

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Re: Looking for more info on Type 26
« Reply #14 on: July 29, 2017, 10:52:21 AM »
This diagram was discussed here:
http://www.classicrotaryphones.com/forum/index.php?topic=16885.msg174225#msg174225



                                On Desk Stands Having One Trans. Cord

                                            Use a piece of #22 gauge
                                            bare copper wire to ground
                                            transmitter by connecting
                                            center terminal and bridge.
                                            Fasten screws securely.

"C'est pas une restauration, c'est une rénovation."--François Martin.