Author Topic: Removing House Paint from Rubber Cords  (Read 939 times)

Offline TelePlay

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Re: Removing House Paint from Rubber Cords
« Reply #15 on: July 22, 2017, 07:04:20 PM »
For future reference "Goof Off Gunk & Adhesive Remover" is an interesting mixture of solvents.

Ethanol, 2-Butoxy-  {Ethylene glycol n-butyl ether, <11.0 %
d-Limonene, <10.0 %
Oleic acid potassium salt, < 6.0 %
Benzenemethanol  {Benzyl alcohol}, < 6.0 %
Inert ingredients, the remaining percentage, could be oils and/or water type dilutes/fillers

From my mixing up the old Brasso, I know Oleic acid in used to allow the mixing of oil and water solutions. d-limonene is a hydrocarbon oil chemically classified as a cyclic terpene. The ether and alcohol are both water soluble. The Oleic acid keeps them together in solution, they don't separate as oil and water.

So, both aqueous and hydrocarbon solvents working a the same time to dissolve paint and residue. Kind of like the Swiss Army Knife of removers. Works slow but will dissolve paint over time. I used it to get paint off of a D1 Continental suede base cover. Came out looking like new.

There is a "Goof Off 2" with slightly different ingredients and the MSDS sheets caution that both are about equal in toxicity. I read the cautions on these items as if I worked in the plant there they were made, if there was a large spill or as a fire fighter showing up to put out a major fire at the manufacturing plant.

A small bottle off the shelf from Walmart applied with a Q-tip or small patch of cotton to a small area for a short time would be a limited exposure with with the proper dungeon precautions (larger room or area with good air flow over the work area), Goof Off would be a good item for uses as needed.
            John . . .

              

Alex G. Bell

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Re: Removing House Paint from Rubber Cords
« Reply #16 on: July 22, 2017, 07:49:10 PM »
For future reference "Goof Off Gunk & Adhesive Remover" is an interesting mixture of solvents.
Interesting!  Generally it's a bad idea to expose rubber to oils unless compatibility has been determined.  For example different kinds of rubber parts in brake systems require different kinds of brake fluid.  So in retrospect I think using ammonia was the safest thing, suggested to me by the mention of ammonia in Windex in a previous reply.

Victor Laszlo

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Re: Removing House Paint from Rubber Cords
« Reply #17 on: July 23, 2017, 12:21:16 AM »
I have used GoofOff to remove graffiti and other stains from various surfaces. When I tried to use it to remove the residual glue from a sticker, placed on the dashboard of a family car, by an enthusiastic pre-teenage stickerer, it just created a 16 square inch area of glue where there had been a 2 square inch area before I started.  It worked very well as a solvent, but also just as well as a distributor.  The final product that produced good results was Mobil 87 octane on an old Grateful Dead T shirt.

Offline TelePlay

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Re: Removing House Paint from Rubber Cords
« Reply #18 on: July 23, 2017, 09:50:16 AM »
I have used GoofOff to remove graffiti and other stains from various surfaces. When I tried to use it to remove the residual glue from a sticker, placed on the dashboard of a family car, by an enthusiastic pre-teenage stickerer, it just created a 16 square inch area of glue where there had been a 2 square inch area before I started.  It worked very well as a solvent, but also just as well as a distributor.  The final product that produced good results was Mobil 87 octane on an old Grateful Dead T shirt.

Goof Off Gunk % Adhesive Remover is but one in a long line of GO products, each with different mixtures and abilities. The 3rd one down is a Super Glue that contains ~80% acetone and ~20% N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone, a very aggressive remover.

The GO Power Cleaner and Degreaser contains ~30% hydrotreated light distillate (could be napatha) mixed with a similar hydrocarbon. This would be similar to gas on a rag with gas being a mixture of light hydrocarbons with great ability to dissolve glue residue, as would be mineral spirits or naphthalene or even lacquer thinner.

Point is, nothing works for everything and yes glue residue is tough. Getting a price sticker of a glass product leaves a residue. On glass I go directly to acetone. If it's a plastic item, I start with mineral spirits. If that doesn't work, I move to lacquer thinner, then toluene, then MEK ending with acetone. But, in each starting with mineral spirits looking at the cloth to see if the solvent is taking off the material being cleaned, turning the color of the material.


PRO STRENGTH


GO Professional Removers Aerosol
GO Professional Removers
GO Graffiti Removers
GO Pro Strength Super Glue Remover
GO Gunk & Adhesive Remover


DIY REMOVERS


GO Heavy Duty Removers
GO Heavy Duty 4 oz Pump Spray
GO Heavy Duty Wipes
GO Foam & Caulk Remover
GO Power Cleaner & Degreaser


HOUSEHOLD CLEANERS


GO Rust Stain Remover
GO Rust Stain Remover Bathroom
GO Toilet Tabs
GO Rust Stain Remover Outdoor
GO Heavy Duty Grill Cleaner
GO Heavy Duty Hand Cleaner
GO Heavy Duty Multi-Task Cleaner
GO Heavy Duty Stainless Steel Cleaner & Polish
GO Heavy Duty Pet Stain Cleaner
GO Heavy Duty Glass Cleaner Aerosol


PAINT REMOVERS & STRIPPERS


GO Pro Stripper Aerosol
GO Semi-Paste Pro Stripper
GO Semi-Paste All-Purpose Stripper
GO Liquid Sprayable Stripper
GO Pro Strength Adhesive Remover
GO Paint Stripper After Wash

Now, gasoline, due to it nature being a highly volatile fuel, contains a mixture of very light to moderately light hydrocarbons. The mixture as it comes off of the cracking and distillation towers at a refinery is not always the same. The intent is octane and flash point standards, not actual, specific ingredients. So, gasoline is a mixture of many different things that will each by themselves dissolve residue, many things you can not buy off the shelf due to their toxicity. The graph and chart below show one mixture of gasoline take one day from one source. I color coded the larger peaks so you can see how the chart and graph work together. The height of the peak is also directly related to the concentration of that chemical in the gasoline so the higher the peak, the more of it that is in the gas.

Gas is a great solvent for many things. It has the issue of the very 4 and 5 chain hydrocarbon (butanes and pentanes) light volatiles becoming airborne and in a high enough concentration in a closed environment with just the right mixture of oxygen (air) can cause an explosion. I've used it in the past but prefer to stick to the pure components by the quart off the shelf and paint or hardware stores.

So, for those who didn't know, now you do.
            John . . .

              

Offline K1WI

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Re: Removing House Paint from Rubber Cords
« Reply #19 on: July 23, 2017, 07:36:53 PM »
Hi guys (and ladies), 
  A while back I was given a big box of soiled , moldy , and paint marked phones. None were rare to any degree so I tried a few experiments with solvents , cleaners etc and the best thing I came up with was throwing the cases and cords in the dish washer ( top rack ) and using cascade complete detergent . Most of the paint came off "in the wash" or was easy to pick off. Removed the cases before the drying cycle but tried leaving coiled cords wrapped on a dowel and they came out both clean and with tighter coils !! Even did a 302 metal body and it did not harm the black finish but loosened paint residue.
   Don't think I'd use this on any rare phones . Had one bad result... a gold 202 D1 imperial turned into a silvery phone it was already in bad shape so not a big loss.
Andy F     K1WI

Andy F    K1WI