Author Topic: Article on How to Spot fakes and antique restoration with black light  (Read 312 times)

Online 19and41

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Re: Article on How to Spot fakes and antique restoration with black light
« Reply #15 on: November 01, 2017, 01:43:18 PM »
Out of curiosity, how would one repair a sign that had enamel loss as it's damage?
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Offline TelePlay

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Re: Article on How to Spot fakes and antique restoration with black light
« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2017, 03:24:58 PM »
Out of curiosity, how would one repair a sign that had enamel loss as it's damage?

Not easy, not cheap but available from at least this one source of noted repute.

     http://www.vankannelsignrestoration.com/

Their before and after gallery of repaired/restored signs speaks for itself.


Getting the mixture the right color and similar solids content content, preparing the part to be restored, application, drying and baking. Nothing to it, right?

The hard part if getting the materials, buying the equipment needed and developing the expertise to do the work and get it right the first time on a customers item. Once baked on it does not come off with acetone, as with paint jobs gone wrong. In doing the restoration, it's basically baking glass (base plus images and lettering of other colors on the base) onto the defective sign area.


Sargeguy wrote"I am not usually a fan of restoring signs but this one could use a touch-up.  Restoration by Van Kannel Sign Restoration will be $150-175.  Here is a look at some of their work:" at the main topic link (Van Kannel link at top of this reply).

          http://www.classicrotaryphones.com/forum/index.php?topic=12421.0
     
            John . . .

              

Offline TelePlay

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Re: Article on How to Spot fakes and antique restoration with black light
« Reply #17 on: November 01, 2017, 03:35:38 PM »
Here's on of their many before and after signs in their gallerys of work which should get everyone to check out their site (no, I don't get a kick back).
            John . . .

              

Online 19and41

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Re: Article on How to Spot fakes and antique restoration with black light
« Reply #18 on: November 01, 2017, 03:42:13 PM »
So they do actually reapply the vitreous material on the sign?  I have done smaller metallic glazing work on jewelry pieces.  That is really something in being able to do that without affecting the sign.  Based on my personal experience I'd say they earn their money!
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Offline TelePlay

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Re: Article on How to Spot fakes and antique restoration with black light
« Reply #19 on: November 01, 2017, 04:15:19 PM »
So they do actually reapply the vitreous material on the sign?

Yes, seems so and it's put back on in the same layer overlay as the original sign.

This example from their site shows the layering, or shelving as they call it, where a colored thicker layer of vitreous is applies to the bottom or base layer. This image shows quite a difference. Other signs they show do not have that difference, some almost flat. I guess they do what is needed to perfectly match the original sign creation. Some have the colored parts near flush with the base layer, others  like the attached sign.

They are not very forthcoming on how they do it, just what the end result looks like.

From their gallery, they do a good bit of business.

I found the before and after images of the sign they used to show the layering or shelving of colors. They seem to really re-make the sign as originally created, or pretty close to it.
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Online 19and41

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Re: Article on How to Spot fakes and antique restoration with black light
« Reply #20 on: November 01, 2017, 04:43:12 PM »
Really nice work!  I guess the stakes attract resourceful artisans.  I've wondered if a reproduction could be made using layered applications of pigmented liquid epoxy.  It would have the look and such a fake could be easily detected.
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
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Offline Brinybay

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Re: Article on How to Spot fakes and antique restoration with black light
« Reply #21 on: November 01, 2017, 05:43:55 PM »
Hi Collectors,
I ran across this  informational tidbit  on the AntiqueAdvertising.com website  .

"How to spot fakes and antique restoration with black light
Does anyone have any thoughts on the value of the use of this light for porcelain sign collectors? 
Thanks,
Bob Farber

Great article, here's the link to the full article: 

     http://antiqueadvertising.com/how-to-spot-fakes-and-restoration-with-black-light/


==================

EDIT:  The full article has been printed to a pdf file and attached for posterity
« Last Edit: November 01, 2017, 06:12:57 PM by TelePlay »
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Offline Sargeguy

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Re: Article on How to Spot fakes and antique restoration with black light
« Reply #22 on: November 01, 2017, 08:50:58 PM »
I'm not sure how they do it but I don't think it involves replicating the original process.  One sign I had restored had a paper ING-RICH label attached to the back.  When the sign was returned the ING-RICH label was unscathed.  If they had to bake on vitreous enamel, the label would have been incinerated.




FYO: since I wrote that post the prices Don Van Kannel has quoted me seem to have increased significantly.  I imagine his work is in high demand.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2017, 08:57:02 PM by Sargeguy »
Greg Sargeant
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