Author Topic: Oxalic Acid--New Rust Removal Technique  (Read 356 times)

Offline WEBellSystemChristian

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Oxalic Acid--New Rust Removal Technique
« on: January 27, 2018, 12:39:32 PM »
I found this on another unrelated forum---looks pretty promising to me!

https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/tech-using-oxalic-acid-to-remove-rust.248198/
Christian Petterson

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Offline TelePlay

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Re: Oxalic Acid--New Rust Removal Technique
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2018, 01:56:03 PM »
It's a naturally occurring organic acid found in greens and vegetables and the body converts ascorbic acid, Vitamin C, into oxalic acid. It's the simplest dicarboxylic and a stronger acid than acetic acid, vinegar.

Yes, can be used to remove rust and bleach items including wood. I would think it works slowly but with his results.

Good find. Keep us up to date on where and how it works.

Another natural item like molasses to restore stuff.

            John . . .

              

Offline kleenax

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Re: Oxalic Acid--New Rust Removal Technique
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2018, 02:58:08 PM »
I use phosphoric acid called, Prep & Etch or something like that from Home Depot. Works GREAT!
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Offline RotarDad

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Re: Oxalic Acid--New Rust Removal Technique
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2018, 03:57:38 PM »
It would be awesome to toss a rusty rubber-footed 500 base in some of that to see how it works....  appears to not damage the paint which would be really great...
Paul

Offline TelePlay

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Re: Oxalic Acid--New Rust Removal Technique
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2018, 04:27:51 PM »
I use phosphoric acid called, Prep & Etch or something like that from Home Depot. Works GREAT!

Good memory. When it comes to phosphorous, there are so many different available products for so many different uses. The best and probably original surface cleaner used by painters to clean dirty walls of homes before apply a new coat of paint make sure it sticks was Tri-Sodium Phosphate. It was a powder that was mixed with water and applied with a sponge and a rubber gloved hand. Strong stuff but took years of grease off quickly. Due to environmental activists saying the phosphorous was getting into lakes causing algea to bloom, only a "substitute" is found on store shelves, and dishwasher soap is also phosphate free meaning dishes may not always come out clean.

"Ospho 605 Metal Treatment" is used by me and at least one other member to clean and prep (etch) metal prior to painting and powder coating. Works well and helps produce a very nice finish.

Phosphoric Acid is a strong acid used to clean concrete. Can be used to remove rust. This is an inorganic acid, I guess similar the HCL (toilet bowl cleaner). I use the thin version of "The Works" toilet bowl cleaner (dilute hydrochloric acid) to quickly remove rust from screws and other rusted phone parts that can be soaked in a small container for a minute or two. Does a nice job on brass screws.

I think the difference here is strength vs time. The reducing sugars in molasses take days to weeks to do their job removing rust. Oxalic acid must also take time. Both reduce or remove rust without damaging the underlying metals.

The inorganic acids will eat the metal, all of it, if left in too long. Nitric and hydrocloric acid are used in the lab to disolve metals, put them into solution.

If always boils down to whatever a member is comfortable using, had used and has developled a technique with the product to do the job well.

I'd like to hear from other members as to what they use to do whatever, how it works and how long it takes.

Images of the products follow:
            John . . .

              

Offline WEBellSystemChristian

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Re: Oxalic Acid--New Rust Removal Technique
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2018, 08:53:51 PM »
I just bought 2 pounds of Oxalic Acid power on Amazon. It doesn't sound like much, but considering that 2 tablespoons per gallon of water is more than enough for rust removal, this should last me awhile!

I'll be testing this out on some rusty bases, along with a certain mystery rusty project coming my way.

If this is as harmless to paint as I have read, this should be an excellent chemical for rust removal on our phones.
Christian Petterson

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Offline Fushigi Ojisan

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Re: Oxalic Acid--New Rust Removal Technique
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2018, 09:44:26 PM »
I'm a bit new to this, and not a heavy-duty restorer, but wanted to chime in.

There is a cleaning product out there called "Bar Keeper's Friend" that uses Oxalic Acid as the main cleaning agent.  I've used it to remove rust stains from wood (then neutralized it with baking soda).   

Never thought to use it for full-blown rust removal though, how does it work for preserving original metal finishes?
Fushigi Ojisan
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Offline WEBellSystemChristian

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Re: Oxalic Acid--New Rust Removal Technique
« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2018, 11:04:15 PM »
I'm a bit new to this, and not a heavy-duty restorer, but wanted to chime in.

There is a cleaning product out there called "Bar Keeper's Friend" that uses Oxalic Acid as the main cleaning agent.  I've used it to remove rust stains from wood (then neutralized it with baking soda).   

Never thought to use it for full-blown rust removal though, how does it work for preserving original metal finishes?
I know about Barkeeper's Friend. It sounds like the more user-friendly version of straight Acid, but I prefer the straight stuff.

It actually doesn't preserve the metal at all...it's the exact opposite. If you don't neutralize the metal immediately after with water (preferably distilled), it will immediately flash rust, requiring another Acid treatment to get rid of the new rust. I'd suggest using a wax to preserve the finish.
Christian Petterson

"Whether you think you can or think you can't, you're right" -Henry Ford