Author Topic: Setting up a home rotary phone network/switching system  (Read 1122 times)

Offline AE_Collector

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Re: Setting up a home rotary phone network/switching system
« Reply #15 on: February 14, 2018, 12:28:56 PM »
Panasonic used the term Easaphone for many things Phone related for many years. I recall little speakerphone adjuncts that we’re Panasonic Easaphone.

The PBX you will find in 8 Station and 16 Station versions. And it is quite easy to use the system in default mode without the need to do any programming through a proprietary Panasonic digital phone. But some woukd want to play with its abilities more so woukd acquire the phone as well.

I have an 8 Station PBX around here that I’ve never used and I think I may have the correct digital phone for it as well. One day I will see that it works and sell it. Meanwhile they are available on eBay quite often.

Terry

Offline Brinybay

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Re: Setting up a home rotary phone network/switching system
« Reply #16 on: February 14, 2018, 03:03:02 PM »
Thanks for the additional responses, Terry and Brinybay!

I wanted to ask because I’ve seen the “Easa-Phone” name used in various eBay ads and elsewhere to refer to either the PBX, the companion Panasonic phones, or the entire system. But I assume you’re referring to the companion phone—that the desk set can be used to program some of the PBX functions, right?

Yes, there is a separate desk set that's used to program it.  I have one, but I've never needed or wanted anything but the default program.  You can use the PBX by itself if the phone isn't included.

Based on the eBay link you provided as well as many other phone collector demonstration videos I’ve seen, it seems like the Panasonic model 308 PBX is a popular choice. Are there any things to watch out for—such as components that tend to go bad? Or model revisions that make some 308s better than others?

There are other versions of that particular PBX, plus other brands other than Panasonic.  My only experience is with the 308 version.

On mine, I marked the extension numbers to make them easier to read.  In the default mode, all you need to do is plug the incoming line to CO1 and any extensions into the outgoing ports 11-18.  To dial an extension, you just dial the port it's hooked to.  For example, you have two phones plugged into ports 11 and 12.  To dial extension 12 from 11, pick up the handset and just dial 1-2.  The default ring for dialing extensions is a two-shorts ring (incoming calls will ring normally but in cascading order, like in my video).  To dial an outside line, pick up the handset and dial 9, then the number.  The PBX also acts as a pulse-to-tone converter.

As far as components that go bad, my only experience with that was when I bought a second one from Goodwill for dirt cheap a few years ago.  I'm not trained in electronic trouble-shooting, but I don't mind tinkering and experimenting if it's not too technical.  You can read about it here: http://www.classicrotaryphones.com/forum/index.php?topic=11219.0

You’re referring to older phones with a crank that was used to signal the central office, correct? I don’t anticipate that I’d be getting into equipment of that vintage, so I should be OK on that count. I had planned on using primarily 500-series type phones because I thought they’d offer the best overall combination of durability, availability, and price. But if I’m incorrect, by all means, set me straight.

There are more "modern" desk sets that used a magneto, such as Leich 901 and "Beehive" phones, Stromberg-Carlson 1248 phones, et al.  I think they're all 40s-era phones.  The technology to rig them as magneto-powered, internal-only extensions is probably not that complicated if you're familiar with electronics.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2018, 12:10:02 AM by Brinybay »
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Offline AE_Collector

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Re: Setting up a home rotary phone network/switching system
« Reply #17 on: February 14, 2018, 03:39:29 PM »
Most of the Leich (pronounced LIKE) 901’s (Bills 3rd picture - first black phone) that I have seen are 1950’s, early to mid 50’s.


Offline HarrySmith

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Re: Setting up a home rotary phone network/switching system
« Reply #18 on: February 14, 2018, 04:18:03 PM »
There a lots of topics on here about the Panasonic PBX's. Here is one that has the manual:
http://www.classicrotaryphones.com/forum/index.php?topic=8531.msg91682#msg91682
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Offline briantroutman

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Re: Setting up a home rotary phone network/switching system
« Reply #19 on: February 15, 2018, 10:33:28 AM »
Panasonic used the term Easaphone for many things Phone related for many years.

Thanks, Terry. That clears it up.

The PBX you will find in 8 Station and 16 Station versions. And it is quite easy to use the system in default mode without the need to do any programming through a proprietary Panasonic digital phone.

And if I’m interpreting correctly, the model numbers seem to correspond to the number of stations and lines (308 being 3 lines, 8 stations—616 being 6 lines, 16 stations, etc.). Based on demonstration videos I’ve seen, the default operation seems very simple.


As far as components that go bad, my only experience with that was when I bought a second one from Goodwill for dirt cheap a few years ago.  I'm not trained in electronic trouble-shooting, but I don't mind tinkering and experimenting if it's not too technical.  You can read about it here: http://www.classicrotaryphones.com/forum/index.php?topic=11219.0

Thanks for the link, Bill. The play-by-play account of your process with photos is very helpful and will give me some items to check if I purchase a unit that turns out to be nonworking.

There a lots of topics on here about the Panasonic PBX's. Here is one that has the manual:
http://www.classicrotaryphones.com/forum/index.php?topic=8531.msg91682#msg91682

Thanks for this, Harry—the manual will certainly be most helpful. I can probably determine ahead of time whether there are any programmable features that would make it worth getting one of the Panasonic desk sets.

Again—thanks everyone for being so generous with your time and experience.

Offline Owain

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Re: Setting up a home rotary phone network/switching system
« Reply #20 on: February 15, 2018, 11:40:29 AM »
It will depend on the version, but the later KX-TA range support hotline dialling for extensions, so you can lift the handset and the system will dial a number for you automatically, which is useful for demonstrating dial-less phones.

Offline AE_Collector

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Re: Setting up a home rotary phone network/switching system
« Reply #21 on: February 15, 2018, 11:46:26 AM »
Yes, 308 is 3 lines and 8 stations etc. Identifying maximum capacity this way is pretty close to an industry standard for electronic key systems by most manufacturers.

Terry

Offline Babybearjs

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Re: Setting up a home rotary phone network/switching system
« Reply #22 on: February 15, 2018, 07:45:19 PM »
I'm so glad I have a 1A1 system.....4 line 10 extensions with a whole house intercom.... and the growth is unlimited....
John

Offline compubit

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Re: Setting up a home rotary phone network/switching system
« Reply #23 on: February 15, 2018, 09:34:53 PM »
I will put my 2¢ in on the Panasonic Switches: if  you can find one and afford it, go for a KX-TA624 or KX-TA824.

They often "start out" as 3x8 systems (3 incoming lines and 8 extensions), but can be upgraded to 6x16, then 6x24 (KX-TA624) or 8x24 (KX-TA824).  With the "master" phone, you can program everything, but a lot can be done with feature codes.  I haven't delved into the manual (it's in a 3" binder) - I just use it in the default setting.

I have 2 solidly working systems and a couple I got for almost nothing that aren't working, but I think one is a fuse, though not the other 2...  I got my first one from work - it cost me a bag of Easter Candy (after Easter, when on sale) - it was leftover from an old office my company had in Florida, and has the caller ID modules, and the Voice Mail system.  Not bad for a $3 "investment". 

I use it all of the time to test phones, plus I have one line connected to the master line in my house (when I get my kitchen done, then I'll have some new wires run upstairs and into the basement, so that each jack can have its own line.  Maybe by then I'll have a working C*Net node here at home...

Jim
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Favorite Phone: Western Electric Trimline - it just feels right holding it up to my face!

Offline briantroutman

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Re: Setting up a home rotary phone network/switching system
« Reply #24 on: February 16, 2018, 03:57:11 PM »
I'm so glad I have a 1A1 system.....4 line 10 extensions with a whole house intercom.... and the growth is unlimited....

Hi John- I don’t know if you noticed—after receiving your post about 1A1 systems on the first page, I responded below it with a few questions. But I can summarize here in short:

If I go with a 1A1 (or similar Western Electric key system), am I limited to using only key system phones (such as a 565 five-line phone instead of a normal 500 desk set)? Or can other standard phones be somehow converted or adapted to work with the key system? I don’t have a need for multiple lines or to dial out, so losing that functionality isn’t a problem.

Also, other than searching eBay or trying to gain access to old office building’s phone closets and basements, do you have any suggestions of where I might look for a key system if I decide to explore that option?

Many thanks for the suggestions.


I will put my 2¢ in on the Panasonic Switches: if  you can find one and afford it, go for a KX-TA624 or KX-TA824.

Thanks for the cents, Jim. Having the specific model numbers has made it easy for me to find PDF versions of the owner’s manuals, and I can comb through to see if any features stand out that might steer me to one system vs. others.

Offline rdelius

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Re: Setting up a home rotary phone network/switching system
« Reply #25 on: February 16, 2018, 05:01:50 PM »
To use telephones on a 1a1 or ia2 you must modify them for a lead control.If the telephone set has hookswitch break contacts on both sides of the line, one can borrow one set for a lead control You would nwwe additionak keys to select the line if this is important

Offline AE_Collector

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Re: Setting up a home rotary phone network/switching system
« Reply #26 on: February 17, 2018, 12:33:57 AM »
Any 1A1 or 1A2 System isn’t “really” what you want. It is a system to operate the lights on the old pre electronic key system phones. An add on that a complete key system frequently had was an intercom on a line key to call to other stations. Single line “normal” phones can usually be modified to work in a key system but without some key phones there is little reason to have a key system. You could have just the intercom portion but for ease of set up and overall features such as the ability to dial out of the system by dialing 9...an electronic key system such as the Panasonic is the way to go. Many electronic key systems only work with their own proprietary phones which isn’t what you want either, thus the Panasonic is what you want. If you really get into this and down the road you want some old key phones then you can start playing with 1A1 and/or 1A2.

Terry

Offline Owain

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Re: Setting up a home rotary phone network/switching system
« Reply #27 on: February 17, 2018, 09:05:28 AM »
and you can use the Panasonic to provide "CO" lines to your 1A2.

Offline Brinybay

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Re: Setting up a home rotary phone network/switching system
« Reply #28 on: February 18, 2018, 12:11:17 AM »
Most of the Leich (pronounced LIKE) 901’s (Bills 3rd picture - first black phone) that I have seen are 1950’s, early to mid 50’s.

Who's Bill?
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Offline Brinybay

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Re: Setting up a home rotary phone network/switching system
« Reply #29 on: February 18, 2018, 12:15:44 AM »

Thanks for the link, Bill.


There's that Bill guy again!  Maybe I should start hanging out here more.   :o

Greg

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