Author Topic: Dial to fiber optic system  (Read 322 times)

Offline ncali

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Dial to fiber optic system
« on: June 11, 2019, 05:30:37 PM »
with the help of several people here I recently found and connected
a candlestick and subset to my home line.
   I had to upgrade my internet service today and they installed a fiber
optic system. They tied my copper house lines and the fiber cable into a
box then ran the fiber to the router. My house phone is still connected to the
copper as is the stick. But this system will not recognize the clicks of a dial.
they said it needs to be tone dial.
  Not going to put a tone dial in this stick!  do I have any other options ?
It will receive calls and I can speak , just cant dial.
   any Ideas?

Offline HarrySmith

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Re: Dial to fiber optic system
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2019, 06:09:21 PM »
There are several options to get your pulse dial working. One is a Panasonic PBX which a lot of us have. Also, there are converters available that can be installed in the phone or subset and others that just plug in. I do not have any experience with the converters as I got a Panasonic years ago. A search here for pulse to tone converters should bring up a plethora of topics on them.
Harry Smith
ATCA 4434
TCI

"There is no try,
there is only
do or do not"

Offline Ktownphoneco

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Re: Dial to fiber optic system
« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2019, 07:13:12 PM »
If whoever installed your fiber optic cable brings it to a modem first, then to a router, or uses a combination modem & router, you may find that the modem is equipped with a pulse to tone converter.    I'm in Canada, and Bell Canada just installed a fiber optic system in my house this past Friday.   The fiber optic cable comes into the house and connects to a combination modem & Wi-Fi router, which has an on-board pulse to tone converter.    The telephone jack on the modem (RJ-11 jack) then goes to the "old" copper demarcation point, which is disconnected from the old copper line coming into the house.    Once the modem is connected to the demarcation terminal, all the wall jacks in the house are active.   My entire system, TV, internet and telephone are all now on fiber optic service, and all my antique pulse dial antiques ring and can dial out using pulse dials.     I was on a Voip system for all 3 services, and the cable companies modem had a pulse to tone converter as well.    I switched because the cable company's prices were getting ridiculous.    There is still equipment in service other than antique telephones that use pulse dialing, so it's always a wise idea to ask the service provider if they can provide a modem equipped with a pulse to tone converter.    It doesn't take up much space on the modem's circuit board, and costs very little to incorporate into the device when it's manufactured.  I'm not guaranteeing your service provider has them, but it's worth asking about.

Jeff Lamb       

Offline AT2796

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Re: Dial to fiber optic system
« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2019, 12:03:59 AM »
If whoever installed your fiber optic cable brings it to a modem first, then to a router, or uses a combination modem & router, you may find that the modem is equipped with a pulse to tone converter.    I'm in Canada, and Bell Canada just installed a fiber optic system in my house this past Friday.   The fiber optic cable comes into the house and connects to a combination modem & Wi-Fi router, which has an on-board pulse to tone converter.    The telephone jack on the modem (RJ-11 jack) then goes to the "old" copper demarcation point, which is disconnected from the old copper line coming into the house.    Once the modem is connected to the demarcation terminal, all the wall jacks in the house are active.   My entire system, TV, internet and telephone are all now on fiber optic service, and all my antique pulse dial antiques ring and can dial out using pulse dials.     I was on a Voip system for all 3 services, and the cable companies modem had a pulse to tone converter as well.    I switched because the cable company's prices were getting ridiculous.    There is still equipment in service other than antique telephones that use pulse dialing, so it's always a wise idea to ask the service provider if they can provide a modem equipped with a pulse to tone converter.    It doesn't take up much space on the modem's circuit board, and costs very little to incorporate into the device when it's manufactured.  I'm not guaranteeing your service provider has them, but it's worth asking about.

Jeff Lamb     

Sounds like you used to be on a “line share” which is POTS with your dsl service riding the same copper pair. Now that you’re on fiber the only copper in your service is like Ktown said above. Your choices are listed above as well as in Harry’s reply or calling your telco back (AT&T?) and ask for your POTS service as well as your fiber optic internet. Just be sure to be very clear that you want both, or you may end up with 48 volts and no internet....
Andy

Offline dsk

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Re: Dial to fiber optic system
« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2019, 01:05:21 AM »
Have been on fiber for about 18 months now.  Our solution is an ATA (Linksys) and a pulse to tone adapter (Dialgizmo)
Working well, but you will always hear the little dtmf after each digit. Actually no problem because we do not hold the receiver close to the ear while dialing.

As mentioned earlier in this thread a Panasonic may be a better solution for many people. The Mitel Smart-1 may also be an option.

dsk

Offline RB

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Re: Dial to fiber optic system
« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2019, 08:18:37 AM »
I gotta side with the Bro's who knows. ;)
There are options. each with their own set of rules.
The best option imho is the pbx rout.
They can hide anywhere, and you will most likely be addin to your collection.
You mentioned putting that candle together?
might do it again?
pbx solves the p to t issue, and leaves room for expansion.
And, they are reasonably priced.

Offline countryman

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Re: Dial to fiber optic system
« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2019, 01:58:25 PM »
The telephone jack on the modem (RJ-11 jack) then goes to the "old" copper demarcation point, which is disconnected from the old copper line coming into the house.   

"Here" they would force you into an all IP plan. POTS is only available for long time customers who do not want any internet service. The good side is, there are pulse capable routers or interfaces out there.
Then again, private PBX are collectible nowadays. I's guess most of them are already retired and replaced by all IP solutions in business applications. Many routes to go, a pulse to tone converter would be the last resort.
In a german forum someone suggested to build an interface for LB phones. That would be cool: Use cortana or however the lady's name is as an operator. Just don't electrocute her with the magneto!!!

Offline ncali

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Re: Dial to fiber optic system
« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2019, 09:36:14 PM »
Thank You all for you responses. Yes it was the big telco that did the
install and the tech seemed to be knowledgeable with the
system he installed , he didnt seem to know or  didnt want to share
much info about the old dial phone systems.  I will search for a dial to
pulse info and read up .

Thank You again

Offline ncali

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Re: Dial to fiber optic system
« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2019, 12:32:01 PM »
They left my old copper line from the pole . It ties into a terminal block
on the roof line.
They used a new fiber line from the pole , both going into a box
mounted at the entry point to the house.
From that box they ran a fiber cable to the modem and a phone line to the
modem also
Modem has eithernet sockets and a broad band socket.

Offline shadow67

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Re: Dial to fiber optic system
« Reply #9 on: June 13, 2019, 11:37:17 PM »
I have a U-Verse line which does not accept pulse dialing. I use the X-Link BTTN which I learned about on this forum and it works very nicely connecting a dial Princess phone to the U-Verse line.