Author Topic: Early British No10 Dial  (Read 351 times)

Offline FABphones

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Early British No10 Dial
« on: August 24, 2019, 06:38:45 PM »
I'm really pleased to have found this early British dial.

Initially, looking at the photos I thought it might be a No8. Four terminals with the earlier small dial label centre. Although the terminals were not in a line, which I would expect on a No8. Seller said there was no writing on it, but as not too many of these older dials come up for sale, I bought it.

When it arrived I spotted a small hole to the right of the spring set assembly, so not a No8, but an early No10 with a missing terminal (dial No8 has 4 terminals, dial No10 has 5). A wipe over and around the rim on the reverse side revealed the manufacturer codes: S-29, 235, No10.

Siemens 1929
235 (second variant)
Dial Number 10

Type S (33.3% break)

I have been doing a bit of a swot up on dials in the last few weeks. Not quite ready as yet to strip this 90 year old dial down for cleaning, I do now have an Ultrasonic Bath if needed. The mystery of the moment is why that terminal isn't there.

Meantime, I have a tin containing misc GPO dial parts including screws, and I'm hopeful there is also a suitable terminal in there.

Photos below, photo 4 for comparison from:
https://www.britishtelephones.com/dial1.htm
A collector of  'Monochrome Phones with Sepia Tones'
...and a Duck!
----------------
I don't collect Red Phones  ...they are starting to collect me
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Vintage Phones - 10% man made, 90% Tribble

Offline Jack Ryan

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Re: Early British No10 Dial
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2019, 08:07:24 PM »
Nice dial, pity about the missing off normal springs.

Yours is a GPO version but none are common. I would like a W version but I don't think I have ever even seen one.

Here is my Siemens version.

Jack

Offline FABphones

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Re: Early British No10 Dial
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2019, 08:24:30 PM »
Thanks for adding that photo Jack, it really helps to have a good clear picture when trying to match up a part.
My tin - which I have almost moved on countless times, thinking I'll never need any of it - has quite a few misc dial parts in it, including springs and assemblys. Here's hoping.  :)
A collector of  'Monochrome Phones with Sepia Tones'
...and a Duck!
----------------
I don't collect Red Phones  ...they are starting to collect me
----------------
Vintage Phones - 10% man made, 90% Tribble

Offline ThePillenwerfer

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    • Joe's Corner.
Re: Early British No10 Dial
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2019, 09:31:36 AM »
I bet the springset off any later dial would fit. 

Offline tubaman

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Re: Early British No10 Dial
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2019, 01:11:52 PM »
Nice dial, pity about the missing off normal springs.

Yours is a GPO version but none are common. I would like a W version but I don't think I have ever even seen one.

Here is my Siemens version.

Jack

@Jack Ryan,
Is this what you mean by a W version?
I got the phone some years ago just for the small centre dial - think I paid 50 for it.
The phone base is marked "MS 1369-1" and "W31" which I believe was the UK Western Electric Factory?
Dial card is original too which is a real bonus.
 :)

@FABphones,

You did well there. Any No10 contact set should fit so shouldn't be too impossible to find.
Really nice original finish too - you see so many that are ruined by being polished back to brass, and you just can't replicate that original finish as it was done using some pretty nasty chemicals I believe.
I see you've also got the card retainer ring which is good as they are often missing and very hard to find.
 :)
« Last Edit: August 26, 2019, 01:18:37 PM by tubaman »

Offline FABphones

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Re: Early British No10 Dial
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2019, 01:29:19 PM »
@Jack Ryan,
Is this what you mean by a W version....

Very nice.

Could you add a photo looking down on the Pulse Wheel, you should be able to see a large W on it (same place as you can see the S on ours above), under the shadowed area on your photo.

* screenshot from above website.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2019, 01:53:23 PM by FABphones »
A collector of  'Monochrome Phones with Sepia Tones'
...and a Duck!
----------------
I don't collect Red Phones  ...they are starting to collect me
----------------
Vintage Phones - 10% man made, 90% Tribble

Offline tubaman

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Re: Early British No10 Dial
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2019, 01:43:40 PM »
Now I understand what you mean by the 'W' version - I was thinking manufacturer code (learn something new every day here!)
Afraid mine is just a boring 'A' type.
Yours being a type 'S' makes it even more special.
 :)
« Last Edit: August 26, 2019, 01:55:23 PM by tubaman »

Offline ThePillenwerfer

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    • Joe's Corner.
Re: Early British No10 Dial
« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2019, 02:47:03 PM »
Manufacturer code W was Western Electric prior to 1925 but after that signifies Standard Telephones & Cables Ltd - North Woolwich, London.

Offline Jack Ryan

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Re: Early British No10 Dial
« Reply #8 on: August 27, 2019, 12:38:05 AM »
Early on there were several different exchanges in the UK - Automatic Electric (Strowger), Siemens and Western Electric primarily. Each exchange used different dial pulse timing meaning that spares for each type had to be kept. In an effort to standardise, Siemens Brothers developed the No 8 dial which had a changeable pulse cam - an 'A' cam for the ATM (Strowger) exchanges, an 'S' cam for the Siemens exchanges and a 'W' cam for the Western Electric (Rotary) exchanges. It was not possible to use any of the previous dials (No 1, No 3 or No 5) to create all three dial timings.

The 'W' pulse cam was used on the Western Electric Rotary exchange so it is, in effect, a manufacturer's code.

A telephone circuit change to, amongst other things, suppress bell tinkle required a different dial off normal contact configuration resulting in the Dial No 10 as used on the Teles No 150, 121 et al.

As has been noted, Western Electric's non US interests (except in Canada) were sold in 1925 to the ITT group who traded under the Standard Electric name (same font). In the UK, Commonwealth and other countries where the UK had influence, the W manufacturer's code referred to the new company - in the UK, that was STC.

Jack