Author Topic: AE number card question  (Read 1614 times)

Offline finlover

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AE number card question
« on: March 22, 2010, 07:27:58 PM »
Okay, I give up!  What the heck do the RLS and CAL stand for?  Also, what's the meaning of CHANNEL SELECTOR on the second card?  I recently won a NOS military AE dial that has that same card.  It looks like the numbers were done in luminous paint (that have turned brown now).
« Last Edit: March 22, 2010, 07:31:18 PM by finlover »

Offline Wallphone

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Re: AE number card question
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2010, 08:34:36 PM »
My guess is "Release" and "Calculate".
I was going to bid on one of those dials when the starting price was $4.99.
They were being sold on eBay by John LaRue's brother.
His initial auctions only had a picture of the front of it.
I asked for and received a picture of the back.
I didn't know how to use them since they only have two shunt contacts instead of three.
Dougpav

Offline LarryInMichigan

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Re: AE number card question
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2010, 09:05:36 PM »
If you look up the numbers printed on the front of the package, you will see that these dials were used in Navy radio equipment.  I assume that the dial was used to select a communication channel.

I think that you could use one of these dials in a phone.  Usually, both the transmitter and receiver are shunted while the dial is being turned, but you could probably get away with shunting only the transmitter.

Larry

Offline JorgeAmely

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Re: AE number card question
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2010, 09:18:19 PM »
Larry:

Wouldn't it be better to mute the speaker to protect the users hearing?

Jorge

Offline LarryInMichigan

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Re: AE number card question
« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2010, 09:52:02 PM »
Jorge,

I guess that you could shunt either.  Whatever works.

Offline HowardPgh

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Re: AE number card question
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2012, 12:16:09 AM »
That dial was used for a remote control reading of a radio transmitter. You dialed it to read the operating parameters(ie. plate current, antenna current, various voltages) on a meter in the studio.  May years ago you had to have a 3rd class FCC license to work at a radio station, especially at a small one where the board operator or DJ had to log the transmitter readings every hour. (been there, done that)
RLS=release
CAL=calibrate
I had one of these with 11 holes.
Howard

Online paul-f

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    • Old Telephones as Entertainment!
Re: AE number card question
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2012, 01:52:57 AM »
That brings back memories.  My high school had a low power FM station and several of us had to have the 3rd class radiotelephone license with broadcast endorsement in order to operate the power switch on the transmitter and fill in the transmitter readings in the station operating log.  The license test was really simple, as most of us were already licensed amateur radio operators.

To open the transmitter for maintenance and adjustment required a first class license, which was a bit more challenging to get.
Visit: paul-f.com         WE 500  Design_Line

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Offline dsk

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Re: AE number card question
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2012, 05:21:01 AM »
If you look up the numbers printed on the front of the package, you will see that these dials were used in Navy radio equipment.  I assume that the dial was used to select a communication channel.

I think that you could use one of these dials in a phone.  Usually, both the transmitter and receiver are shunted while the dial is being turned, but you could probably get away with shunting only the transmitter.

Larry
E.g. German telephones shunt the entire network, (or line after the pulse contacts) this works quite well, but you get one click (not loud) after each digit dialed.
I guess most people using those telephones lives with it.  Never been problem for me, but I have noticed the difference.  Less problem in telephones with resistors making the anti sidetone balance then those who contains capacitors.

I would have shorted the receiver instad, if the click was too loud.

dsk

PS This "modern" phone was put up on the base when I served.
DS

« Last Edit: February 09, 2012, 06:07:59 AM by d_s_k »