Author Topic: What is the timing for ringing cycles (ring cadence)  (Read 271 times)

Offline RotoTech99

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What is the timing for ringing cycles (ring cadence)
« on: July 25, 2020, 10:01:57 AM »
Dear Forum:

Hi, I've been trying to remember what the timing is for a ring cycle on straight line ringing, and hoped the Forum can please refresh my memory...

I've always thought the ring cycle for straight line ringing was 2 seconds on, 1 second off, and 2 seconds on; (a 5 second cycle).

Some have said its more like two seconds on, two seconds off, then two seconds on, and i'm not sure which would be closer to being right...

If someone can please answer my question, I'd be very thankful.

BTW: A few of my neighbors have asked about this, and since i was curious, i thought
i'd ask also.

Thanks,
RotoTech99

Offline twocvbloke

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Re: What is the timing for ringing cycles (ring cadence)
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2020, 10:05:07 AM »
For the US, 2-on, 4-off... :)

Offline Jim Stettler

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Re: What is the timing for ringing cycles (ring cadence)
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2020, 10:08:59 AM »
For the US, 2-on, 4-off... :)
Yes
Per wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Precise_tone_plan

Audible ringing tone is defined as comprising frequencies of 440 and 480 Hz at a level of −19 dBm and a cadence of 2 seconds ON and 4 seconds OFF.
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Offline RotoTech99

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Re: What is the timing for ringing cycles (ring cadence)
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2020, 01:00:37 PM »
Dear Forum:

The ring timing I was thinking of was when the called phone  rings, pauses, then rings again.... Not the ring tone heard on the line when someone is called, but if the two on,4 off applies there also, i think my question is answered.

Thanks,
RotoTech99

Offline Jim Stettler

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Re: What is the timing for ringing cycles (ring cadence)
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2020, 01:13:19 PM »
Dear Forum:

 but if the two on,4 off applies there also, i think my question is answered.

Thanks,
RotoTech99
cadence of 2 seconds ON and 4 seconds OFF is the answer.

You live, You learn,
You die, you forget it all.

Offline RotoTech99

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Re: What is the timing for ringing cycles (ring cadence)
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2020, 02:29:44 PM »
Dear Jim S.

Thank you for clarifying the answer... That's what i thought it was; i have been a tad rusty on remembering stuff like that.

Rototech99

Offline Owain

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Re: What is the timing for ringing cycles (ring cadence)
« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2020, 05:32:13 PM »
And the reason is that the ringing machine has 3 outputs:

RR----
--RR--
----RR

with the lines distributed over the outputs so a ringing generator only 1/3rd the size is required to ring the bells, compared to one where the silent part of the cadence wasn't used. It also means in automatic exchanges that the ringing voltage and tone can be supplied quickly to the subscriber rather than waiting for 6 seconds (USA).

Japan uses 1 second on, 2 seconds off; UK uses 0.4s on, 0.2s off, 0.4s on, 2s off; both are still a 1 in 3 repeat cycle.

Offline twocvbloke

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Re: What is the timing for ringing cycles (ring cadence)
« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2020, 07:13:03 PM »
And a good example of a British ringing machine producing the old-style tones (pre-electronic) is here on youtube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VzIXvO6RahQ

Quite fun watching the contacts and matching them up to the outputted tones...  ;D

Offline dsk

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Re: What is the timing for ringing cycles (ring cadence)
« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2020, 01:41:23 PM »
Here in Norway you had 1 sec ring, and 4 silence, but that could wary pretty much. The timing was usually depending on the charge/discharge time of a capacitor. 

When I have ringing phones at home, people does not remember the details, so they often likes the US style better since that is what we hear more often in films. By that reason 20Hz seems to be better than 25.  But when it comes to the dial tone they prefer a pure A at 440 (-442) instead of the 425 used the last 60 years. 

dsk