Author Topic: E1 HANDSET SERVICE TIPS  (Read 34299 times)

Offline Phonesrfun

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Re: Disassembling an E1 handset
« Reply #45 on: April 01, 2011, 03:22:19 AM »
Was the receiver once working, and now all of a sudden the volume is very low, or did you get the phone in that condition.  It could be a wiring issue, rather than the receiver itself.

If it does come to needing to check out the receiver, what I would do before trying to force the cap off is to get a couple of alligator test leads from Radio Shack, and connect the receiver via the test leads to a 500 receiver handset to see if you get regular volume out of the E1 receiver when hooked up that way.  If you get regular volume, you first of all don't need to go any further with trying to remove the nasty cap, and secondly, you know that you need to look for a wiring issue in the phone or where the wires enter the base of the handset.

-Bill G

Offline Bill

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Re: Disassembling an E1 handset
« Reply #46 on: April 01, 2011, 12:07:44 PM »
Thanks for the ideas, guys. I hadn't intended to get into the problem here, holding that for a separate discussion, but since you ask:

  I bought the phone and the 634A subset separately.
  The phone was dial-less, so I bought a 4H dial and had it tuned up by Steve Hilz.
  I haven't yet tried cleaning the dial contacts, and I don't know if Steve checks that.
  Neither unit was advertised as "working", and I just got them together for the first time yesterday.
  I'm quite sure the wiring is correct. I am an electroniker by profession. I used Bingster's excellent diagrams, and cross-checked against the TCI diagrams.
  I have individually checked the components in the subset. The 101A induction coil has the right winding resistances. Both capacitors show Open with an ohmmeter, as they should.
  In addition, the pseudo-capsule measures 32 ohms DC resistance, against a nominal 30 ohms.
  The phone actually works correctly. I get dial tone when coming off-hook, and it dials the number correctly, but the receiver volume is extremely low.
  The phone line (I have a modem on my cable TV line) works well with a POTS phone - a rotary-dial princess in this case.

I did not think of clip-leading another receiver into place, or clipping this receiver into another phone.. I will do that today. I think what I am hearing you say is that, although they have different physical configurations, they should all work more or less correctly, right?

The pictures you referenced show that the aluminum fitting is screwed into a brass insert, not directly into the bakelite. I didn't know that, and I find it encouraging.

Finally, I certainly don't want to break anything, but my natural curiosity makes me want to know how the pseudo-capsule is built. I had read that earlier miswiring could have demagnetized the magnet, and that is probably what happened. I have a vague thought that I could somehow mount a small high-strength rare-earth magnet on the original one, and get some performance back.

Short summary - thanks for the ideas. I'll be back!

Bill
« Last Edit: April 01, 2011, 12:13:53 PM by Bill »

Offline Phonesrfun

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Re: Disassembling an E1 handset
« Reply #47 on: April 01, 2011, 12:42:56 PM »
I think what I am hearing you say is that, although they have different physical configurations, they should all work more or less correctly, right?

Yes, absolutely correct.
-Bill G

Offline Bill

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Re: Disassembling an E1 handset
« Reply #48 on: April 01, 2011, 01:17:43 PM »
OK, Bill, you hit the right approach. I clipped the E1 receiver "capsule" into a 500 set, and got very low volume in the E1 capsule. Then I clipped the 500 receiver capsule into the E1 handset, and got normal volume. Seems pretty clear that the problem is in the E1 receiver. And since the DC resistance is OK, it must be a low magnet.

So now my struggle to get it apart continues. I have only one strap wrench, and I agree that I may need another, so I'll have to see if I can borrow one somewhere.

Incidentally, I let the threads soak overnight in penetrating oil (Liquid Wrench). No results. Apparently aluminum-to-brass corrosion is a different animal than the steel that the product was designed for.

Incidentally again, neither the bakelite housing nor the aluminum insert has holes for a pin wrench.

Again, I'll be back.

Bill
« Last Edit: April 04, 2011, 11:14:25 AM by Bill »

Offline LarryInMichigan

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Re: Disassembling an E1 handset
« Reply #49 on: April 01, 2011, 01:32:42 PM »
Bill,

The low volume problem may be from the diaphragm not being able to vibrate properly.  It may be too close or too far from the magnet or bent, or there may be some dirt or corrosion pushing against it.

Larry

Offline Bill

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Re: Disassembling an E1 handset
« Reply #50 on: April 01, 2011, 03:17:43 PM »
Good thought, Larry. If I can get it apart, that's the first thing I'll check out.

Bill

Offline LarryInMichigan

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Re: Disassembling an E1 handset
« Reply #51 on: April 01, 2011, 03:33:41 PM »
Several minutes ago, I lifted the handset of my AE34, and the dial tone from the receiver was very faint.  After the slightest tightening of the cap, the volume became very loud.  The spacing and tension of the metal diaphragms is critical.

Larry

Offline bingster

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Re: Disassembling an E1 handset
« Reply #52 on: April 01, 2011, 11:34:58 PM »
For reference, this image shows the parts and their relationships to each other better than my photos on the other page.
= DARRIN =



Offline Bill

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Re: Disassembling an E1 handset
« Reply #53 on: April 02, 2011, 01:14:02 AM »
Bingster -

That was what I started out looking for! Thanks for digging it up for me! Per the diagram, it appears that my current problem is separating the "Receiver Case" from the "Cap", so that I can access the Diaphragm and the magnet. I'm getting really frustrated. Dry ice may be the next step, to shrink the aluminum.

Many thanks again - you are a great source of info and effort.

Bill

Offline rp2813

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Re: Disassembling an E1 handset
« Reply #54 on: April 02, 2011, 01:42:33 AM »
I had this same problem with the receiver cap on my E1.

I only have one strap wrench, and for this operation two are required in order to have any chance at success.  I had to come up with an alternate method.

It may horrify some members to read about what I did, but here goes.  The hair dryer procedure is a given.  It didn't require much heat.  But securing the assembly so I could use a strap wrench left me with only one option:  putting the base of the receiver element in a vise.  I cut sections from a cardboard paper towel tube to use as cushions and to protect the threads.  I used to have 1/8" thick pieces of leather for this purpose, but they were somehow lost.  I placed the element into the vise between the cushions and tightened only as much as was needed to keep the element from turning while I used the strap wrench to remove the cap.

After heating the cap with the hair dryer I gave removal a try and it was a cinch!  The cap came loose with only moderate but steady effort.  The heating and removal process took less than one minute.  No harm done to the element itself or the cap.  Nothing but a combination of heat and stability was required.

Ralph

Offline GG

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Re: Disassembling an E1 handset
« Reply #55 on: April 02, 2011, 05:51:05 AM »


I'm intrigued with this idea of somehow mounting a small rare-earth magnet to strengthen the magnetic field in abused receivers. 

Alternately, has anyone thought of setting up shop with a very strong electromagnet and some other tools, and offering to fully disassemble & re-magnetize receivers? 


Offline rp2813

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Re: Disassembling an E1 handset
« Reply #56 on: April 02, 2011, 06:35:15 AM »
Going slightly off topic here, I noticed in the picture of Bill's handset that it still has the original style of "bullet" transmitter.

Bill, how is the transmission quality?  Those "bullet" type elements have a bad reputation and I was talked out of one when I wanted to replace mine, so I went with the adapter for the F1 transmitter as shown in the exploded view that Bingster posted.

If you haven't yet held an actual conversation with a distant party using that handset, I would be interested to know how well and how clearly (or not) you could be heard on the other end.

I have to admit that I like being able to use my D1/E1 set like any other phone now that it has the F1 transmitter.  Nobody I call has a clue that I'm using an 80 year old phone with a 75 year old F1 transmitter element.  I got nothing but complaints with the "bullet" transmitter.
Ralph

Offline Phonesrfun

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Re: Disassembling an E1 handset
« Reply #57 on: April 02, 2011, 12:13:20 PM »
My experience is that they are as bad or worse than your average solid back transmitter.  Knowing that the solid back was state of the art at the time, people were probably more than happy to have its sound quality with the convenience of a handset.

In my youth and stupidity, I once took one completely apart.  They have a lot of pieces and are much more complex than its successor, the F1.

I currently have one (Not the one I trashed), and I have opted to use the F1 + adapter when using the phone.
-Bill G

Offline Sargeguy

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Re: Disassembling an E1 handset
« Reply #58 on: April 02, 2011, 12:29:09 PM »
Try baking in the oven at low heat, around 170 degrees followed by the double strap wrench.  Then plunge the aluminum part into some ice water.  Worked for me.
Greg Sargeant
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Offline rp2813

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Re: Disassembling an E1 handset
« Reply #59 on: April 02, 2011, 01:56:50 PM »
Yeah Bill, I opened up my bullet transmitter and only made things worse.  I keep it around, but the F1 is the only way to go.
Ralph