Author Topic: Subset wiring diagrams to WE 102/202?  (Read 10421 times)

Offline Dan/Panther

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Re: Subset wiring diagrams to WE 102/202?
« Reply #15 on: July 01, 2010, 12:57:03 PM »
Duane;
To ease your mind, momentarily disconnect one or the other component to confirm to your self that the phone will stop working.
D/P

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Offline Come in Nighthawk

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Re: Subset wiring diagrams to WE 102/202?
« Reply #16 on: July 01, 2010, 02:34:52 PM »
Duane;
To ease your mind, momentarily disconnect one or the other component to confirm to your self that the phone will stop working.
D/P

 ???  U mean "now.?"  Or "if..."  No need if its "now" as I trust you guys.  If you mean "if," to act as a simple layman's test of some sorts, "on the day," OK, sure.  I'll try to remember, or will make a note, or bookmark this page, or.....   :o

Seriously, thanks again!  :)

Offline GMF

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Re: Subset wiring diagrams to WE 102/202?
« Reply #17 on: December 17, 2010, 02:15:08 PM »
Can anyone help me? I'd like to fix this in time to sell on ebay for xmas shoppers. I have a 202 with a 685A subset but it has the 425B network which is quite different from the 425E network illustrated in this forum. I had it wired and working but after I disassembled it for a repaint I thought I had it wired back correctly but I could get any volume on the headset, though it rang and the switchhook worked correctly. It actually had 7 wires connected, but I understand that only 6 need be involved. Is there any way to use the standard 4 wire 202 config? Thanks

Thanks 

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Re: Subset wiring diagrams to WE 102/202? - "Cheater" subset
« Reply #18 on: December 10, 2011, 05:37:22 PM »
Nighthawk:

You asked for the diagram for the resistor/capacitor subset that can be used on a 102/202 phone.  Well, here it is.

This is essentially the same circuit that Ma Bell used in early buttset (Lineman's test sets) back in the day when induction coils were heavy and bulky.

This is not a true subset, in that it does not use an induction coil, so there will not be the full gain in volume at the distant end as would be from a subset using an induction coil.  On todays modern phone systems, it will probably not be noticeable to anyone.

It is not antisidetone.  It is sidetone, which means that it is perfect for the 102 style phone that has three leads coming from the deskset.  If you have a 202 with a fourth black lead (antisidetone), just tape the end of the black wire and don't use it.

This circuit does match the impedance of the line to the phone and the capacitor provides D.C. isolation from the receiver so that the receiver does not get demagnatized over time.

There is, of course, no ringer in this circuit.  Since it only consists of two parts, rather than using a terminal strip, it could alternatively be wired in an RJ-11 terminal block like I show in photo number 3.  Room for wiring is a little tighter in that case, but produces a much better looking result.

It uses three commonly found parts and all can be acquired from Radio Shack.

Photo number 1 is the diagram and parts list for the circuit.
Photo number 2 is a picture of one I just made up and tested.
Photo number 3 is the same circuit built in a standard modular terminal block

Note that in photo 2, I used a terminal strip that I had available, and it is not the Radio Shack terminal strip, so one you buy from them will look different.  In photo number 3 is the terminal block which can also be acquired from Radio Shack or almost anywhere else that sells phone attachments.

Also note that whether you use the terminal strip vesion or the terminal block version the only wires used from the house jack are the Red and Green.  All other wires coming from the house jack are used for things like second lines and can be either snipped off or just not used.  In the photo of the terminal block (#3) you may see that I snipped off the yellow, black, blue and white wires to make for a neater looking job, and so I could make use of the spare terminal screws for the resistor and capacitor.

Don't confuse the wires coming from the jack with the ones coming from the B1 or D1 desk set.  The desk set also uses red, yellow, and green (and sometimes black), so don't snip the wires from the desk set!

Take a look at the attached and let me know if you have any questions.

As an FYI, I just picked up a D-1 202 deskset that was said to be ready for use by plugging it into a modular line wall jack but it did not have a ringer. Upon opening the base, I found two 1.1 uF capacitors hooked up in parallel (2.2 uF) and two 120 ohm resistors in series (240 ohms) wired between the dial and hook switch, exactly like your wiring diagram of Radioshack parts. I took them out because I want to put a 302 subset on the phone. Just thought you'd like the feedback. They didn't use a terminal strip, just wired the deskset.

My only question on seeing this was didn't they just use one capacitor and one resistor instead of two each?
            John . . .

              

Offline Phonesrfun

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Re: Subset wiring diagrams to WE 102/202?
« Reply #19 on: December 10, 2011, 06:12:00 PM »
They were probably working out of a box of spare parts and did not want to go buy the parts they needed, would be my guess.
-Bill G

Offline antiqueguy

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Re: Subset wiring diagrams to WE 102/202? - "Cheater" subset
« Reply #20 on: April 22, 2012, 09:55:05 PM »
Nighthawk:

You asked for the diagram for the resistor/capacitor subset that can be used on a 102/202 phone.  Well, here it is.

This is essentially the same circuit that Ma Bell used in early buttset (Lineman's test sets) back in the day when induction coils were heavy and bulky.

This is not a true subset, in that it does not use an induction coil, so there will not be the full gain in volume at the distant end as would be from a subset using an induction coil.  On todays modern phone systems, it will probably not be noticeable to anyone.

It is not antisidetone.  It is sidetone, which means that it is perfect for the 102 style phone that has three leads coming from the deskset.  If you have a 202 with a fourth black lead (antisidetone), just tape the end of the black wire and don't use it.

This circuit does match the impedance of the line to the phone and the capacitor provides D.C. isolation from the receiver so that the receiver does not get demagnatized over time.

There is, of course, no ringer in this circuit.  Since it only consists of two parts, rather than using a terminal strip, it could alternatively be wired in an RJ-11 terminal block like I show in photo number 3.  Room for wiring is a little tighter in that case, but produces a much better looking result.

It uses three commonly found parts and all can be acquired from Radio Shack.

Photo number 1 is the diagram and parts list for the circuit.
Photo number 2 is a picture of one I just made up and tested.
Photo number 3 is the same circuit built in a standard modular terminal block

Note that in photo 2, I used a terminal strip that I had available, and it is not the Radio Shack terminal strip, so one you buy from them will look different.  In photo number 3 is the terminal block which can also be acquired from Radio Shack or almost anywhere else that sells phone attachments.

Also note that whether you use the terminal strip vesion or the terminal block version the only wires used from the house jack are the Red and Green.  All other wires coming from the house jack are used for things like second lines and can be either snipped off or just not used.  In the photo of the terminal block (#3) you may see that I snipped off the yellow, black, blue and white wires to make for a neater looking job, and so I could make use of the spare terminal screws for the resistor and capacitor.

Don't confuse the wires coming from the jack with the ones coming from the B1 or D1 desk set.  The desk set also uses red, yellow, and green (and sometimes black), so don't snip the wires from the desk set!

Take a look at the attached and let me know if you have any questions.

Will this cheater subset work with my dailgizmo.   And in what order should I hook them up.  Meaning should I put the pulse converter on the line side or after the subset? I have a  "D1", "202 Thanks.

Offline Phonesrfun

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Re: Subset wiring diagrams to WE 102/202?
« Reply #21 on: April 23, 2012, 01:19:48 AM »
I am sure it can be, but I have never uses or owned a dial gizmo.  If you have it's connection instructions, Please forward it to me or post it here, and I will check.

-Bill G

Offline dsk

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Re: Subset wiring diagrams to WE 102/202?
« Reply #22 on: April 23, 2012, 04:14:02 AM »
You may put the dial gizmo on the line side, it may even serve several telephones on the same line, e.g. located directly on the ATA, or in the NID/master socket etc..

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