Author Topic: The CRPF "Old Phones in Movies & TV" Compilation  (Read 161734 times)

Offline WesternElectricBen

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Re: The CRPF "Old Phones in Movies & TV" Compilation
« Reply #540 on: July 09, 2014, 10:32:16 PM »
The telephone companies got themselves into the handset upside down issue, as they never standardized the way the ear pieces would hang.


Ben

Offline Brinybay

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Re: The CRPF "Old Phones in Movies & TV" Compilation
« Reply #541 on: July 09, 2014, 11:37:45 PM »
More from Murdoch Mysteries.  This particular episode is called "Dial M for Murder", so much of the murder mystery is centered around phones.  Tell me if the switchboard technology looks period correct for 1899.
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Offline TelePlay

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Re: The CRPF "Old Phones in Movies & TV" Compilation
« Reply #542 on: July 10, 2014, 12:06:18 AM »
The episode titled "Night Call" - photo grabbed from the opening minute of this Twilight Zone (Season 5 Episode 19) chiller.
            John . . .

              

Re: The CRPF "Old Phones in Movies & TV" Compilation
« Reply #543 on: July 21, 2014, 10:23:03 AM »
From the "Twilight Zone" episode, Nervous Man in a Four Dollar Room, this phone appears to be a modified WE 653 with a G-type handset.

What say you? Was this actually produced or refurbished in this form, or was it a studio prop?

-Bob Archambault

Offline poplar1

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Re: The CRPF "Old Phones in Movies & TV" Compilation
« Reply #544 on: July 21, 2014, 11:11:53 AM »
From the "Twilight Zone" episode, Nervous Man in a Four Dollar Room, this phone appears to be a modified WE 653 with a G-type handset.

What say you? Was this actually produced or refurbished in this form, or was it a studio prop?



Conversion at WE repair shop. The dial version is coded 653BA per D-157315. The one pictured here started out as a non-dial 533A: notice the blank where the transmitter was originally in the center. Later, the transmitter was moved lower so that a dial could be added (553A or 653A). Finally, it was converted to a handset model. The B indicates a high impedance ringer.

« Last Edit: July 21, 2014, 11:17:27 AM by poplar1 »
"C'est pas une restauration, c'est une rénovation."--François Martin.

Re: The CRPF "Old Phones in Movies & TV" Compilation
« Reply #545 on: July 21, 2014, 08:03:26 PM »
From the "Twilight Zone" episode, Nervous Man in a Four Dollar Room, this phone appears to be a modified WE 653 with a G-type handset.

What say you? Was this actually produced or refurbished in this form, or was it a studio prop?



Conversion at WE repair shop. The dial version is coded 653BA per D-157315. The one pictured here started out as a non-dial 533A: notice the blank where the transmitter was originally in the center. Later, the transmitter was moved lower so that a dial could be added (553A or 653A). Finally, it was converted to a handset model. The B indicates a high impedance ringer.



As you can see more clearly in this picture, this one has a standard switchhook and a G handset. Is this a "kosher" WE conversion?

Yours is a cool example - btw!
« Last Edit: July 21, 2014, 08:05:28 PM by New England Tel. »
-Bob Archambault

Offline poplar1

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Re: The CRPF "Old Phones in Movies & TV" Compilation
« Reply #546 on: July 21, 2014, 08:18:04 PM »
From the "Twilight Zone" episode, Nervous Man in a Four Dollar Room, this phone appears to be a modified WE 653 with a G-type handset.

What say you? Was this actually produced or refurbished in this form, or was it a studio prop?



Conversion at WE repair shop. The dial version is coded 653BA per D-157315. The one pictured here started out as a non-dial 533A: notice the blank where the transmitter was originally in the center. Later, the transmitter was moved lower so that a dial could be added (553A or 653A). Finally, it was converted to a handset model. The B indicates a high impedance ringer.



As you can see more clearly in this picture, this one has a standard switchhook and a G handset. Is this a "kosher" WE conversion?

Yours is a cool example - btw!

Now that I see this picture, I don't think it's a WE shop conversion. That hook is for a 143/144/706A receiver. 

The cradle on the 653BA per D-157315 resembles others made for F-type handsets---such as on 211s, 354s, or 191G coin phones.
"C'est pas une restauration, c'est une rénovation."--François Martin.

Offline poplar1

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Re: The CRPF "Old Phones in Movies & TV" Compilation
« Reply #547 on: July 21, 2014, 08:20:58 PM »
Anita and I got hooked on Murdoch Mysteries.  Lots of sticks in this series, here's a couple of them.  I believe the phone in the third picture is called a "staircase"?

Transmitter assembly on the NE was installed backwards. Notice that the receiver cord exits facing the user. True left-handed desk stands would have the cord on the back. Other one is a Kellogg.
"C'est pas une restauration, c'est une rénovation."--François Martin.

Re: The CRPF "Old Phones in Movies & TV" Compilation
« Reply #548 on: July 21, 2014, 08:26:42 PM »
From the "Twilight Zone" episode, Nervous Man in a Four Dollar Room, this phone appears to be a modified WE 653 with a G-type handset.

What say you? Was this actually produced or refurbished in this form, or was it a studio prop?



Conversion at WE repair shop. The dial version is coded 653BA per D-157315. The one pictured here started out as a non-dial 533A: notice the blank where the transmitter was originally in the center. Later, the transmitter was moved lower so that a dial could be added (553A or 653A). Finally, it was converted to a handset model. The B indicates a high impedance ringer.



As you can see more clearly in this picture, this one has a standard switchhook and a G handset. Is this a "kosher" WE conversion?

Yours is a cool example - btw!

Now that I see this picture, I don't think it's a WE shop conversion. That hook is for a 143/144/706A receiver. 

The cradle on the 653BA per D-157315 resembles others made for F-type handsets---such as on 211s, 354s, or 191G coin phones.

It does make you wonder though. Why would the TZ producers go to the trouble of making an incorrect prop when they certainly had access to the proper phones of the period (which needed no modifications)?

Who knows?
-Bob Archambault

Offline poplar1

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Re: The CRPF "Old Phones in Movies & TV" Compilation
« Reply #549 on: July 21, 2014, 08:30:20 PM »
More from Murdoch Mysteries.  This particular episode is called "Dial M for Murder", so much of the murder mystery is centered around phones.  Tell me if the switchboard technology looks period correct for 1899.

These switchboards appear to be 552s with added woodwork to make them look old. The 552 is an attendant console for a dial PBX such as a 701 or 740. It doesn't have lamps for each line jack, only amber lamps for the central office trunks.  Also, operators in picture appears to be talking to several subscribers at once.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2014, 08:39:42 PM by poplar1 »
"C'est pas une restauration, c'est une rénovation."--François Martin.

Offline BDM

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Re: The CRPF "Old Phones in Movies & TV" Compilation
« Reply #550 on: July 26, 2014, 10:58:22 AM »
Twilight Zone - A Nice Place to Visit


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Offline BDM

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Re: The CRPF "Old Phones in Movies & TV" Compilation
« Reply #551 on: July 26, 2014, 05:47:57 PM »
Psycho


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Offline Brinybay

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Re: The CRPF "Old Phones in Movies & TV" Compilation
« Reply #552 on: August 14, 2014, 11:43:33 PM »
Lauren Bacall, 1924-2014.  Not sure which movie the first pic is from, but the second one is from Dark Passage.  There didn't seem to be many pics of her talking on a phone.  The second one is an animated gif.


https://sgtr.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/dark-passage1.gif
« Last Edit: August 14, 2014, 11:47:02 PM by Brinybay »
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Offline tallguy58

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Re: The CRPF "Old Phones in Movies & TV" Compilation
« Reply #553 on: September 20, 2014, 08:45:16 PM »
I watched "G-Men" with James Cagney tonight and my eyes bugged out when I saw this.

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Offline Dave F

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Re: The CRPF "Old Phones in Movies & TV" Compilation
« Reply #554 on: September 24, 2014, 03:01:39 PM »
The Day After is a 1983 drama about the aftermath of a nuclear exchange between the USSR and the USA.  This made-for-TV movie caused considerable controversy when originally aired.  Some of the more unsettling images of the horrors of being caught in a nuclear blast were excised before the film was permitted to be shown on network television.  While not terribly graphic by today's standards, it still gives the viewer plenty to ponder.

Here is an AUTOVON panel phone in use aboard a SAC EC-135 (Looking Glass) Airborne Command Post aircraft.  The scenes inside the EC-135 were borrowed from a previous Air Force training exercise, and the people shown are real SAC officers.  If you ever wanted to see an AUTOVON phone in use, this is about as real as it gets.  (As a sideline, the scenes of the interior of the missile launch complex are also real, so there is a lot of eye candy for the military enthusiast.)

DF