Author Topic: 202 picture of dial wiring  (Read 2825 times)

Offline happy hooligan

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202 picture of dial wiring
« on: December 26, 2008, 08:22:26 PM »
My 202 D1 set has no wires on the actual screws of the dial.  I'd like to set it up so I can dial it.

Anyone have a picture of the dial wiring?  I can plug it to the wall and get dial tone, but can't dial.

My dial is not clearly marked but looks like SP-1?  and 1880480-L on it?

any help?
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Offline bingster

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Re: 202 picture of dial wiring
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2008, 09:22:37 PM »
Here's the diagram you need.  Depending on what type dial you have, the terminals may be in different places on the dial, but the terminals will have the same markings wherever they are. 

You didn't mention if you have a subset, so I'll give the standard 202 warning:  If your 202 has an E1 handset, you'll need a subset between the phone and the wall jack.  Connecting the telephone directly to the wall jack will allow too much current to flow through the receiver, demagnetizing it, and will eventually weaken it to a point at which nothing can be heard through the receiver.
= DARRIN =



Offline happy hooligan

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Re: 202 picture of dial wiring
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2008, 01:32:59 AM »
Thank you for the tip and diagram...

Which ringer box should I get with this phone so it works perfectly?

Here's two photos one of the phone and one of the dial...



« Last Edit: December 27, 2008, 01:39:01 AM by happy hooligan »
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Offline bingster

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Re: 202 picture of dial wiring
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2008, 01:54:57 AM »
Ohhhh... the diagram I posted isn't going to help you, because the dial on your phone is from another manufacturer.  It's an Automatic Electric dial on a Western Electric telephone.  I don't know anything about AE dials, so maybe somebody else can help with how one would be wired into a WE telephone.

The subsets that are best for this phone are numbers 634 and 684.  You can also use 534, 584, and 685, although using a 685 requires a number of wiring modifications.  Always remember that the ringer is the least important part of a subset.  It's the induction coil that's the really important thing.
= DARRIN =



Offline BDM

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Re: 202 picture of dial wiring
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2008, 03:31:59 AM »
Now, that dial may have been installed by someone else for selling or operating purposes. But, I've read articles in the past that lay claim to this being done by small independents. The AE dials were cheaper compared to W.E. dials, so the independent TELCOs saved money in service. I've heard some of those small ma/pa operations could really throw together a frankenphone of many different parts. But hey, if it worked, it worked :)

--Brian--

St Clair Shores, MI

Offline Dan/Panther

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Re: 202 picture of dial wiring
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2008, 11:39:28 AM »
BDM;
I'm sure those Mom/Pop outfits didn't loose too much sleep worrying about some collector 70 years into the future.
I would bet that fully 90% or more of the original users, never noticed or even cared about how the dial looked.
Like you said, all they wanted was a working phone at the cheapest cost to them.

D/P

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Offline dsk

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Re: 202 picture of dial wiring
« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2016, 04:06:57 PM »
May this diagram be the right one? It is from the bottom of a D1 with AE dial.
dsk

unbeldi

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Re: 202 picture of dial wiring
« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2016, 07:27:06 PM »
May this diagram be the right one? It is from the bottom of a D1 with AE dial.
dsk

The diagram depicts a circuit that uses a D5 handset mounting.  A D5 has additional terminals and springs in the hook switch.  It was ordinarily used for the 206-type telephone for local-battery-talking common-battery-signaling operation.

The circuit however, appears to use it for 202-type wiring with an AE dial that has a WECo-compatible contact arrangement.  It is not a Western Electric circuit.   The dial in this topic is not compatible with this wiring, nor with standard WECo wiring, as it is a standard AE dial.

Offline mentalstampede

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Re: 202 picture of dial wiring
« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2016, 08:48:28 PM »
I hooked up a 202 awhile back using a 685 subset and a WE 6T dial that used AE style dial contacts(shorting across the transmitter instead of opening the circuit to mute the dial pulses). If you can figure out which terminals are what on the dial, the diagram I altered to figure out what I was doing might help.

Edit: Just noticed how old this thread is! I don't know if this person will be back after 8 years to check for replies!
« Last Edit: July 21, 2016, 08:52:33 PM by mentalstampede »
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unbeldi

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Re: 202 picture of dial wiring
« Reply #9 on: July 22, 2016, 07:49:15 AM »
I hooked up a 202 awhile back using a 685 subset and a WE 6T dial that used AE style dial contacts(shorting across the transmitter instead of opening the circuit to mute the dial pulses). If you can figure out which terminals are what on the dial, the diagram I altered to figure out what I was doing might help.

Edit: Just noticed how old this thread is! I don't know if this person will be back after 8 years to check for replies!

Indeed, the 6T and 6U dials were made for Design Line telephones which used network-type circuitry like the 500-series.  The 6T and 6U dials therefor had normally open shunt switches, two of them with four leads, rather then the old break-and-make transfer switch of the 6A-like dials with only three leads.