Author Topic: Info on ITT 425 PCB network AKA 181427 network  (Read 2992 times)

Offline Tom Vici

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Info on ITT 425 PCB network AKA 181427 network
« on: March 23, 2011, 02:14:35 PM »
Hello to the group.


I play with making old phones work.   I have an old Kellogg wallboard phone.   I intend to put a ITT 425 PCB network into it.    I can see L1 and L2 really clear on the board.    My question is
where do I put the rcvr, xmtr and ringer.   I'd like to make those old bells ring again.   

Any assistance on the wiring of this board would be most appreciated!

Regards
Tom

Offline Phonesrfun

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Re: Info on ITT 425 PCB network AKA 181427 network
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2011, 06:51:29 PM »
Tom,

Welcome to the forum

Not an easy question without knowing a couple of things.  First, when you say wallboard phone, what are you referring to;  A wood magneto wall phone?  If so, it would help to have the model number of that phone.  The old local battery magneto phones will not work on the regular networks without some form of either modification or an adapter circuit.

If you are talking about rewiring and disconnecting wires internal to the phone to hook to a 425 network, and if the phone is pretty much original and nobody has already hacked into the wiring, then you may damage the value of the phone by rewiring, and you should consider an adapter if you want the mangeto phone to work on a regular phone line, and at the same time conserve its value as an antique.

Assuming we are talking about a magneto wall phone, here are some additional things to consider:

What do you plan on doing for a dial?  Some of the ringers in those old phones will also load down modern phone lines if you are not careful.  You do not want to have the magneto in the circuit to send ringing current down the phone line.  This can cause damage to the central office equipment.

Again, welcome to the forum!
-Bill G

Offline GG

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Re: Info on ITT 425 PCB network AKA 181427 network
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2011, 03:12:07 AM »


I'd suggest posting photos of the outside and inside of the phone so folks here can see clearly what's going on and make relevant suggestions.

There are ways to rewire old local battery magneto wall phones without destroying the existing wiring.  Basically it comes down to being able to run new wiring to the relevant components and/or provide new terminals for the existing wiring, without cutting existing wires.  Then a rotary dial or touchtone dial can be mounted in an outboard box (better than having to open the front of the phone each time you want to make a call) next to the phone (on the right is probably best since your left hand is holding the receiver). 

The ITT network can rest on the interior partition or on the bottom of the battery box without need of screwing it down. 

Thus everything is reversible back to original condition should you or someone want to do so at some point in the future.

When all of this is hooked up & working, your outgoing voice will probably sound about the same as or slightly worse than it does on a cellphone, but not much worse.   And you can remind people that the transmitter & receiver are almost a century old, so you have an excuse that iPhone and Droid and so on don't. 

Offline Kenny C

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  • Bell Sytem
Re: Info on ITT 425 PCB network AKA 181427 network
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2011, 03:23:04 AM »
Off topic here but, I find the iPhone a great phone. It has the best sound quality(on a cell phone) I have ever heard. I am getting the iPhone 3GS Friday. I have had a 3G and it was a great phone and was very very durable. My first one was already fairly old and lasted for another 10-11 months and stopped due to charging issues. If you are looking into a smart phone I highly recommend the iPhone.
In memory of
  Marie B.
1926-2010

Offline Tom Vici

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Re: Info on ITT 425 PCB network AKA 181427 network
« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2011, 05:08:39 PM »
Tks for the welcome and the reply

Basically what I have is an empty case.  In the case is the magneto and leads to the bells.
I was told that once the bells rang when the crank was turned.   

The earpiece is a repro, the xmitter may be original, but the guts of both are replaced with modern
components.   

This thing had the guts of a generic phone inside and the xmitter and earpiece was wired to the ckt board of the generic.    The switch hook went across L1.   Apparenlty it worked until the generic died.   I figured I'd stick the ITT 425 network in there to get it "on line" again. 

This phone will connect to my WE 555 Switchboard and if it generated ring it would only ring at my switchboard.     Dialtone comes from a simulator in the 555. 

So, this is not a full restoration, but a fake it work type deal. 

Regards
Tom





 
Tom,

Welcome to the forum

Not an easy question without knowing a couple of things.  First, when you say wallboard phone, what are you referring to;  A wood magneto wall phone?  If so, it would help to have the model number of that phone.  The old local battery magneto phones will not work on the regular networks without some form of either modification or an adapter circuit.

If you are talking about rewiring and disconnecting wires internal to the phone to hook to a 425 network, and if the phone is pretty much original and nobody has already hacked into the wiring, then you may damage the value of the phone by rewiring, and you should consider an adapter if you want the mangeto phone to work on a regular phone line, and at the same time conserve its value as an antique.

Assuming we are talking about a magneto wall phone, here are some additional things to consider:

What do you plan on doing for a dial?  Some of the ringers in those old phones will also load down modern phone lines if you are not careful.  You do not want to have the magneto in the circuit to send ringing current down the phone line.  This can cause damage to the central office equipment.

Again, welcome to the forum!

Offline Tom Vici

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Re: Info on ITT 425 PCB network AKA 181427 network
« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2011, 05:15:30 PM »
Hello Bill and thanks for the welcome.    Yes, a wood magneto wall phone.   I don't know the model #, but I am going to shoot a pic or two and up load it for you all to see.   Its basically an empty case and has been gutted except for the magneto and the bells. 

The earpiece and xmitter are replaced with modern components (probably from the dead generic phone I found in there).     

I won't need to dial, it is an extention to my switchboard and thus would be used in the
traditional method of having the operator place the call for you.   It would be nice if I can
get the bells to ring on the ring from the switchboard or at least ring when cranking the generator. 

That's basically why I think slapping the earphone and mic to the 425 board with L1 and L2, put the switchhook across the correct terminals, add the ringer and I should be done.   

I guess I could always pickup a generic at the flea market and replace the generic that was in there, but I'd rather just use the  ITT 425 I have in my parts box. 

Regards
Tom

Tom,

Welcome to the forum

Not an easy question without knowing a couple of things.  First, when you say wallboard phone, what are you referring to;  A wood magneto wall phone?  If so, it would help to have the model number of that phone.  The old local battery magneto phones will not work on the regular networks without some form of either modification or an adapter circuit.

If you are talking about rewiring and disconnecting wires internal to the phone to hook to a 425 network, and if the phone is pretty much original and nobody has already hacked into the wiring, then you may damage the value of the phone by rewiring, and you should consider an adapter if you want the mangeto phone to work on a regular phone line, and at the same time conserve its value as an antique.

Assuming we are talking about a magneto wall phone, here are some additional things to consider:

What do you plan on doing for a dial?  Some of the ringers in those old phones will also load down modern phone lines if you are not careful.  You do not want to have the magneto in the circuit to send ringing current down the phone line.  This can cause damage to the central office equipment.

Again, welcome to the forum!

Offline Phonesrfun

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Re: Info on ITT 425 PCB network AKA 181427 network
« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2011, 05:46:45 PM »
I would connect as follows:

Line in:

Red - L2
Green - L1

Jumper L1 with K and also jumper L1 with RR

The hookswitch probably has three soldered terminals.  Use any two of the three, and connect one of the terminals to L2 and the second one to C.  Just don't use the third.  If the hookswitch is more complicated, you only need one section of switch that closes when the receiver is lifted off hook.

Connect the ringer between L2 and A

Connect the receiver wires, one to GN and the other to R

Connect the transmitter wires, one to B and the other to R

That should do it.

The magneto is non-functional in this arrangement.

-Bill G

Offline Tom Vici

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Re: Info on ITT 425 PCB network AKA 181427 network
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2011, 06:30:51 PM »
Ah, that's just beautiful.  I used to have a diagram for the 425 pc board but havent been able to lay my hands on it.   Searched the web, find a couple of pictures, nothing else. 


I will wire the bells to the magneto (now to find the outputs) so it will ring the bells locally. 


Thanks for the guidance!

I would connect as follows:

Line in:

Red - L2
Green - L1

Jumper L1 with K and also jumper L1 with RR

The hookswitch probably has three soldered terminals.  Use any two of the three, and connect one of the terminals to L2 and the second one to C.  Just don't use the third.  If the hookswitch is more complicated, you only need one section of switch that closes when the receiver is lifted off hook.

Connect the ringer between L2 and A

Connect the receiver wires, one to GN and the other to R

Connect the transmitter wires, one to B and the other to R

That should do it.

The magneto is non-functional in this arrangement.