Author Topic: 306, 2 wire ringer, 426A Tube,  (Read 5119 times)

Offline Kenny C

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306, 2 wire ringer, 426A Tube,
« on: September 04, 2011, 09:00:00 PM »
This is for a standard 306
« Last Edit: January 05, 2013, 01:27:34 PM by DavePEI »
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  Marie B.
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Offline Babybearjs

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Re: 306, 2 wire ringer, 426A Tube,
« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2011, 02:11:50 AM »
kenny, great JPG illistration. now I know what one of my 302's originally was. I took the phone and replaced the condenser with the 4 wire version and removed the tube. at the time I did that, I did'nt know there were several versions of the 302. you did a great job on the picture!   John
John

Offline dano2121

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Re: 306, 2 wire ringer, 426A Tube,
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2013, 05:21:38 PM »
I have a question...will this wiring diagram still work if I have a 372A tube?  Reason I am asking is due to my phone still not working after completion of this wiring.  Well better yet I should say my ringer is not working.  I do have a dial tone and the dialing mechanism seems to be working.  Of course I can't dial out but I am going to get a convertor to fix that problem.  I have tested the components and they are all working individually.  My phone service is through my cable provider (not for sure if that matters).
My Phone:
Condensor - 195C
Coil - 101A
Ringer - B3A (I believe this is a tuned ringer due to the spring)
Tube -372A
Any help would be great.  Thanks
If you can't do what is right when know one is looking,
When can you.

Offline poplar1

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Re: 306, 2 wire ringer, 426A Tube,
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2013, 08:31:20 PM »
Usually you would bypass the tube and use a second capacitor instead.
The B3A is not a tuned ringer so it should work, as long as you add the capacitor. I'm guessing a 0.47 uf. capacitor rated at 200V or more would work. (If you need one let me know.)

Has anyone here experimented with the tube for ringing? I'm not familiar with Kenny's diagram above. The tube allows only + or - current to pass through it so it might be possible to reverse some wires and/or the line wires and get the phone to ring.
"C'est pas une restauration, c'est une rénovation."--François Martin.

Offline Phonesrfun

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Re: 306, 2 wire ringer, 426A Tube,
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2013, 09:26:48 PM »
Usually you would bypass the tube and use a second capacitor instead.
The B3A is not a tuned ringer so it should work, as long as you add the capacitor. I'm guessing a 0.47 uf. capacitor rated at 200V or more would work. (If you need one let me know.)

Has anyone here experimented with the tube for ringing? I'm not familiar with Kenny's diagram above. The tube allows only + or - current to pass through it so it might be possible to reverse some wires and/or the line wires and get the phone to ring.


Take a look at this topic.  Quite a lot of detail.  I was not able to get mine to adequately "fire through" due to the relatively low bias voltage of 24 volts, rather than 48 volts coming from my VoIP ATA.  Jorge Amely was pretty successful in getting these to work.  Come to think of it, I don't remember seeing Jorge on here lately.

I think the most prudent thing to do is like ounsaid.... Get a .47 mF 250 volt capacitor, and replace the tube.

See this topic:

http://www.classicrotaryphones.com/forum/index.php?topic=2669.15
-Bill G

Offline Phonesrfun

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Re: 306, 2 wire ringer, 426A Tube,
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2013, 09:29:45 PM »
I see now Jorge has been on quite a bit lately.
-Bill G

Offline dano2121

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Re: 306, 2 wire ringer, 426A Tube,
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2013, 09:46:10 PM »
Is there any way to wire it using the tube?
If you can't do what is right when know one is looking,
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Offline poplar1

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Re: 306, 2 wire ringer, 426A Tube,
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2013, 10:56:13 PM »
I think we need dsk to translate this from a 501T  telephone to a 306.

Maybe this is right for a 306:

Line cord: Red (-) to L1, Green (+) to Y/L2

Ringer: Red to L1, Black to K

Tube: Yellow to L2, Red to K, Black to K..........CORRECTION: RED TUBE TO L1

In other words, same as the diagram for 501T but substituting K in 306 for E in 501T.
« Last Edit: November 02, 2013, 07:52:04 PM by poplar1 »
"C'est pas une restauration, c'est une rénovation."--François Martin.

Offline Phonesrfun

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Re: 306, 2 wire ringer, 426A Tube,
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2013, 11:25:52 PM »
Is there any way to wire it using the tube?

If you need to have a pulse to tone converter because you cannot dial out, that tells me you probably have some sort of VoIP service, be it Vonage, a Cable Internet Phone service, MagicJack, FIOS, or some other form of Internet phone service.  There is nothing wrong with those services, in fact I have my phone service through my cable company, and so the little box in the back room is my "central office" in a box.  I am very happy with it, and mine does support rotary dialing.  Some do not.

At any rate, if you have that kind of phone service and do not have the old fashioned "POTS" line (Plain Old Telephone Service), the tube may not work to ring the phone.  Here is why:

POTS telephone service uses a central office supply voltage of 48 volts.  Most, if not all VoIP routers put 24 volts on the phone line, not 48.  In most circumstances, this makes absolutely no difference.  That is, except for the use of the tube in passing ringing voltage to the ringer.

The tube was used to ring the proper party on a party line.  The phone company used the combination of ringing on one side of the line to ground and different polarity of the central office battery supply on the phone to multiply the choices by a factor of two to double the number of combinations of parties to be rung.

The tubes genreally needed the full 48 volts biased in the right direction to pass the ringing current to the ringer.  In my experience, 24 volts just does not cut it.

I have a phone with the cold cathode tube, and when using it on my 24-volt ATA, the tube glows slightly when activated by the ringing current, but no ringy-dingy.  I have tried it on a regular POTS line and it works, albeit somewhat weak.  My conclusion was that if I had the full 48-volt supply, I would at least get a weak ring.  I probably have a tube that has gone a bit weak, and I have also heard that these tubes are susceptible to weakining over time.  Unfortunately, there are no new cold cathode tubes to be had.

If you decide to experiment, please post your results, because it would be interesting.
-Bill G

Offline poplar1

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Re: 306, 2 wire ringer, 426A Tube,
« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2013, 09:43:15 AM »
Using a 306 base dated 8/47 with 372A tube, it rings well on 5ESS line but barely moves on Magic Jack Plus (even with the biasing spring of the ringer in the notch closest to the front of the phone).

Has anyone tried the ringing output of a 1A2 Key System using the tube?

Folks, this is yet another reason to ditch your VOIP line and get a REAL POTS line from the phone company, while you still can!

If you want free long distance you can sign up for Google Voice. From here it is free for calls to US and Canada  and also has free voice mail.
"C'est pas une restauration, c'est une rénovation."--François Martin.

Offline rdelius

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Re: 306, 2 wire ringer, 426A Tube,
« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2013, 09:55:20 AM »
If using a modular cord instead of hardwired cord,Try reversing the red and green line wires

Offline George Knighton

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Re: 306, 2 wire ringer, 426A Tube,
« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2013, 09:56:49 AM »

Folks, this is yet another reason to ditch your VOIP line and get a REAL POTS line from the phone company, while you still can!

If you want free long distance you can sign up for Google Voice. From here it is free for calls to US and Canada  and also has free voice mail.

A Verizon land line here in Virginia is only $50.00/mo including unlimited long distance in the USA and Canada.

Verizon customer service completely, totally sucks.  No doubt about it.  But once you get the service set up it's nothing for them to have to worry about most of the time, and even this stupid old man can do wiring.

:-)

I'm sure I'll continue to experiment with the PBX, and XLink, and Verizon Home Phone Connect, and Comcast Digital Voice, and most anything else that comes to my attention courtesy of you guys.  

But the regular POTS line looks like it's going to remain a part of the overall solution in the country for the foreseeable future.
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Offline George Knighton

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Re: 306, 2 wire ringer, 426A Tube,
« Reply #12 on: January 16, 2013, 10:00:07 AM »
Verizon, by the way, is one of the companies leading the fight to do away with home phone service.

They have a serious argument about how the US economy would be assisted by their accumulation of huge windfall profits associated with the sale of very, very expensive properties that they are maintaining in order to provide for the remaining physical CO structures, together with other properties with facilities.

I can think of a single property in a fair sized metropolitan area that is by itself, sitting on just 0.25 acre, worth about four million [....]
« Last Edit: January 16, 2013, 10:02:02 AM by George Knighton »
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Offline poplar1

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Re: 306, 2 wire ringer, 426A Tube,
« Reply #13 on: January 16, 2013, 10:08:12 AM »
I heard that in one former 5XB central office they now have a digital CO + a basketball court for the employees.

AT&T has already gotten permission from several state legislatures to discontinue POTS in areas where there are competitive technologies.

Of course, AT&T originally didn't care much about sparsely populated areas because of the cost of installing and maintaining cable. So from 1876-1894 many areas did not have phone service. The original Bell patent expired in 1894 and that is when Stromberg-Carlson and other companies began manufacturing phones (legally) and independent phone companies started.
"C'est pas une restauration, c'est une rénovation."--François Martin.