Author Topic: 304 H3 Party Line Wiring Diagram  (Read 5213 times)

Offline winkydink

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304 H3 Party Line Wiring Diagram
« on: November 06, 2011, 08:58:57 PM »
Would it possible for someone to post a wiring diagram with colors for a Western Electric 304 H3 phone.

I did not realize this was a party line phone, when I began to disconnect the wires.  So I did not make a chart of the original wiring.

I have put many 302's back together but never a 304. 

Any help would be appreciated.  I tired looking on the internet, but the diagrams are too complicated (I hate to admit but true).

Jim
« Last Edit: March 06, 2016, 09:38:11 PM by AE_Collector »

Offline Phonesrfun

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Re: 304 H3 wiring diagram
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2011, 09:07:50 PM »
Here is the link to the diagram in the TCI library.

http://www.telephonecollectors.info/index.php?option=com_docman&task=doc_details&gid=2172&Itemid=11

Bear in mind that the 304 was not JUST for party lines, but also for private lines.  It is mostly the only 300 series wall phone made.  There were others, but the 354 is the most often one out there.

The differences is that with the M tap on the induction coil, it had the capability of ANI (Automatic number identification) for phones connected to party lines.  It was, however, a general purpose telephone.

The TCI document library is a very large wealth of information and diagrams, and is free to anyone, not just members.

-Bill G

Offline winkydink

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Re: 304 H3 wiring diagram
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2011, 06:53:05 AM »
Here is the link to the diagram in the TCI library.

http://www.telephonecollectors.info/index.php?option=com_docman&task=doc_details&gid=2172&Itemid=11

Bear in mind that the 304 was not JUST for party lines, but also for private lines.  It is mostly the only 300 series wall phone made.  There were others, but the 354 is the most often one out there.

The differences is that with the M tap on the induction coil, it had the capability of ANI (Automatic number identification) for phones connected to party lines.  It was, however, a general purpose telephone.

The TCI document library is a very large wealth of information and diagrams, and is free to anyone, not just members.




Bill,.

Thanks for the link, and I have seen this one before (in fact I have printed it out).  My problem is that I cannot follow it.  I am hoping to find something a little more watered down.   I don't have an electronic background and these diagrams are confusing.

I am looking for info like:   I have 6 wires coming from the the switch hook, where do they go ?  4 wires from the ringer, where do they go, etc.  I
need a "dummies" version of the diagrams (or at least that is what I am looking for)

Thanks again.

Jim
« Last Edit: November 07, 2011, 06:57:44 AM by winkydink »

Offline winkydink

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Re: 304 H3 wiring diagram
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2011, 09:06:19 AM »
I just saw the 354 diagram post at the top of this list.  I think this is what I need.  I will try this tonight, and hope for the best.

Offline winkydink

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Re: 304 H3 wiring diagram
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2011, 07:09:05 AM »
In looking at the 354 wiring diagram (and trying to apply to the 304, I have several questions.

From the L2 screw it shows a wire with a break going between L2 and K, Yellow on the L2 side a break and the Slate continuing to the K screw.  What does this mean ?

Same thing from the C screw on the 101B induction coil to the  BK (Black) screw on the 5H dail.  It shows a Red wire from "C" a break and then Black wire continuing to the BK screw.  What does this mean ?

Thanks again.

Offline Wallphone

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Re: 304 H3 wiring diagram
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2011, 09:14:51 AM »
That is the electrical symbol for a Condenser (capacitor). A straight and a curved line something like this  l(   DC voltage can not go through it.
Doug Pav

Offline winkydink

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Re: 304 H3 wiring diagram
« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2011, 09:34:17 AM »
That is the electrical symbol for a Condenser (capacitor). A straight and a curved line something like this  l(   DC voltage can not go through it.
Doug Pav

Yes but how does the wire color go from Yellow to Slate? 

I am really lost guys and gals, just trying to wire this 304 phone and interpret this diagram with no success.  If not a picture, can anyone provide me with a verbal description (i.e. the 6 switch hook wires hook up to the following ...., the 4 ringer wires hook up to the following .... etc.)

Should I take this to another forum and have the administrator delete this thread ?

Offline Wallphone

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Re: 304 H3 wiring diagram
« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2011, 10:17:11 AM »
Western Electric put both condensers in the same can(tainer) and there will be 4 wires coming out. They will be Yellow, Slate, Red and Black according to the diagram. The Yellow wire will go to the L2 terminal, Slate will go to K. Red will go to C and Black will go to BK on the dial. A lot of times the wire colors will fade so they are hard to tell exactly what color they really are.
Doug Pav

unbeldi

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Re: 304 H3 wiring diagram
« Reply #8 on: May 22, 2014, 06:11:59 PM »
Typical wiring diagrams are hard to read and memorize; wires typically criss-cross all over the place, because the components are drawn similarly to the physical units. For example switch hook switches are lumped together in one block.  When it comes to understanding the operation of a telephone for troubleshooting, nothing is as useful as a logically drawn circuit diagram that uses symbols for the components and avoids crossing connections if at all possible.  It is worth the (little) time invested to understand the symbols and principles of drawing circuits.

When confronted with a phone that has a non-standard cord, or even non-factory internal wires, with different colors than the standard, a novice would likely still be confused by color-coded connection diagrams. In addition, it is hard to really understand the operation of a telephone, especially one as complex as the 304, from a connection/wiring diagram alone.

Here is a circuit diagram that is easy to understand, with most of the standard colors are noted.

First a short description of a Type 304 telephone.

The Western Electric 304 telephone set is often confused with the 302, because externally they look the same.  The 304 set is more complex. It can be identified by several internal features:
  • The 304-type set has a housing marked H3 near the rear cord exit on the inside, usually somewhat visible without opening the set. This indicates that the housing has a switch hook assembly with three switches (six wires), rather than two (four wires).
  • The induction coil is a 101B type, not the 101A as for the 302. The 101B has a center tap (M) in the primary winding, but is otherwise electrically equivalent.
  • The B2A ringer of the 304 has one of its two coils split into two separate windings, thus it has 4 wires emerging. When the slate wire and the slate-red ringer wire are connected, the ringer is equivalent to a two-wire B1A ringer of the 302.
  • Finally, the 304 set has a larger terminal connection plate, with four terminals, mounted on the base between the ringer area and the condenser, next to the coil or transformer. See picture below.

In principle, the same features apply to the wall telephone, the 354, only its housing is marked M3, and the set has extra terminal, E, but the circuit is equivalent.

The cradle switch contact pile-up is as follows when viewed from looking to a housing.

   --------------------------------O---------green-red      HS1
       N      ^------------------------o-------slate-red
       N
   --------------------------------O---------brown-yellow   HS2
     N        ^------------------------o-------yellow
     N
   --------------------------------O---------green          HS3 (makes last)
              ^------------------------o-------brown-blue



The green-red/slate-red contacts, here labeled HS1, are those that are added in the cradle switch of the H3 mount, over that of the H1 mounting (302).  [PS: these labels are my designation, and in hindsight chosen unfortunately perhaps, it would have been more logical to reverse the numbering sequence, so that H3 would be the one added in the 304 over the 302.]

This diagram shows the configuration that most people want today to make a 304 set work on modern telephone lines.  This is called bridged ringing for individual service with a two-wire line cord. This means that the ringer is connected between the two line wires, and does not have a connection to ground as was the case in many telephone networks.  Therefore, the GND (ground) terminal does not need to be connected to the line, just red (ring, L1) and green (tip, L2).

The ringing component of the circuit is drawn separately (to the left) from the audio components, to emphasize that it can be tested independently.  The L1 and L2 terminals are therefore repeated on both parts, but are physically the same connection points in the telephone.

The telephone line connects to L1 (red wire, ring) and L2 (green wire, tip), the yellow wire if present can by stored on GND.

The terminals on the connection plate have the following connections.



L1
red to line RING
yellow to hookswitch   
red to ringer

K
black to ringer
slate to condenser   


L2
green to line TIP
green-red to hookswitch   
yellow to condenser
GND
yellow to line ground   
slate to ringer
slate-red to ringer

In summary, here are all connections in the set for individual lines:
Ringer:red to L1, slate-red and slate to GND, black to K
Condenser:slate to K, yellow to L2; black to BK (on dial) and red to C (on induction coil)
Hookswitch:green to GN (on induction coil), brown-blue to BB (on dial)
yellow to L1, brown-yellow to Y (on dial)
slate-red to RR on IC, green-red to L2
Jumper wire:slate-red from dial-R to RR (on induction coil)
Handset cord:red to R (on induction coil), white to W (on dial), black to BK (on dial)
Line cord:red (ring) to L1, green (tip) to L2, yellow (ground) to GND or stored

The circuit is drawn in the on-hook state, meaning that the handset is in the cradle.  When going off-hook, all HS switches (HS1, HS2, HS3) close.  The switches on the dial are labeled DS (DS1, DS2). These are often called off-normal (ON) switches, for the reason that they get operated when the dial is turned from its normal resting position.  The dial pulse contact pair is labeled DP and only opens during the return trip of the dial, interrupting the line current.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2016, 10:06:22 AM by unbeldi »

Offline Babybearjs

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Re: 304 H3 wiring diagram
« Reply #9 on: March 06, 2016, 06:44:50 PM »
on all my 304's and 354's I've wired them as 302's/352's and moved the slate-red and Grn-Red wired to spare terminals on the terminal board and set the phones up for 1A1/1A2 service....
John