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I need help wiring a 202 with 5 wires to a 685A subset. The 202 has 5 wires and I need to connect them to a 685A subset. The 5 wires coming from the phone are white, green, yellow, red and black but the terminals on the subset are 1, 2, K, L1, L2 & G.

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Voting closed: January 14, 2012, 11:22:49 PM

Author Topic: Wiring a 202 with 5 wires to a 685A Subset  (Read 10106 times)

Offline Phonesrfun

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Re: Wiring a 202 with 5 wires to a 685A Subset
« Reply #15 on: January 16, 2012, 04:30:54 PM »
To answer Larry's question.... I do believe they used the same back plate, so I would say yes, all you'd have to do is remove the capacitor from the 687 and drop in a 425B network, and you would have a 685A subset.

To answer Gary's question. the 687A ringer is original.  Nothing has been removed.  The only purpose of that box is to serve as a remote ringer, like for instance in a separate room from a phone so that you know there is an incoming call.  It's only function is that of a ringer.  It just happens to be built from many of the same components as the 685A subset.  Western Electric and other phone manufacturers were good at that.

Here is the link to the cheater subset.  Notice that there are two ways of building it.  One is on a terminal strip, and the other way is a much neater version that is installed in a modular terminal block.

http://www.classicrotaryphones.com/forum/index.php?topic=2849.msg39770#msg39770
-Bill G

Offline gands-antiques

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Re: Wiring a 202 with 5 wires to a 685A Subset
« Reply #16 on: January 16, 2012, 04:31:54 PM »
Where do you get a 425 network and how much do they cost?

Thanks,
Gary

Offline LarryInMichigan

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Re: Wiring a 202 with 5 wires to a 685A Subset
« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2012, 04:42:33 PM »
Where do you get a 425 network and how much do they cost?

Thanks,
Gary

There are millions of them floating around.  I am sure that many forum members have lots of them to spare.  I may have a couple somewhere.

Larry

Offline gands-antiques

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Re: Wiring a 202 with 5 wires to a 685A Subset
« Reply #18 on: January 16, 2012, 05:03:38 PM »
I am confused....If it will ring when a call is coming in then why can't it just be used as is?

Thanks,
Gary

Offline Phonesrfun

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Re: Wiring a 202 with 5 wires to a 685A Subset
« Reply #19 on: January 16, 2012, 05:25:28 PM »
The subset is not just a ringer.  The ringer is in the box, but the more important part of the phone is the induction coil and capacitor for the voice circuit.  A subset contains both the ringer and the voice circuit.

When the 202 was designed and used in the 1920's and 1930's the coil and capacitors were so large that they had to be located outside of the phone body itself, and thus the use of the subset.  When the 302 came out in 1938, it was a technological breakthrough of sorts because the phone was self contained, as technology allowed them to make the parts smaller.

It has often been said that if you buy just the D1 part of a 202 which is just the phone body, you only have a half a phone.  the other half is in the subset.  The 687 you have is only an extension ringer, and is not a subset.

Sorry if this is confusing.  :)

-Bill G

Offline gands-antiques

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Re: Wiring a 202 with 5 wires to a 685A Subset
« Reply #20 on: January 16, 2012, 06:03:43 PM »
Thanks for the explanation.

For future reference, what are the subset model numbers with everything included that I should look for?
I know the 685A that you helped me wire works good.

Thanks,
Gary

Offline Phonesrfun

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Re: Wiring a 202 with 5 wires to a 685A Subset
« Reply #21 on: January 16, 2012, 07:01:59 PM »
Hi Gary,

The most correct subset for the time period of the 202 would be either a 634A or a 684A.  Then, of course, the 685A which is a subset based on the technology of the 1950's and later which uses 5 wires instead of 4.  A line cord with 4 wires and the 634 or 684 subset is more the norm.

-Bill G

Offline gands-antiques

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Re: Wiring a 202 with 5 wires to a 685A Subset
« Reply #22 on: January 16, 2012, 10:04:29 PM »
Thanks Bill.  I will remember these subset models he next time I buy a subset.

I'm attaching another picture of my three subsets. The one on the left is the one that you helped me wire and it is working great. I also have a 687A that needs a 425 network that you told me about and a 684BA that needs the bells.

I know someone who repairs old phones and subsets and he told me he woud fix up these two subsets but he hasn't given me a price yet. He is also going to add the blackplastic phone to wall modular plug wire.

What would you estimate for the cost (labor & material) to add the bells, 425B network and the black modular wires for attaching to the wall ?

Thanks,
Gary

Thanks,
Gary

Offline marty

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Re: Wiring a 202 with 5 wires to a 685A Subset
« Reply #23 on: March 16, 2012, 08:37:22 PM »
Hi All;
One possible solution is to take the ringer from the middle ringer and combine it with the older subset on the right (in the picture) it is an older subset, but it should work with the ringer you have.. Others in the more know should correct me IF I am wrong about this...
THANK YOU Marty

Offline gands-antiques

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Re: Wiring a 202 with 5 wires to a 685A Subset
« Reply #24 on: March 16, 2012, 09:52:06 PM »
Marty,

Thanks a lot for your reply...

I ended up getting a set of bells added to the 684BA subset (right subset) and a 425B network added to the 687A subset (center subset) and they are both working fine now. 

Thanks again,
Gary

Offline poplar1

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Re: Wiring a 202 with 5 wires to a 685A Subset
« Reply #25 on: October 16, 2014, 12:49:02 PM »
This diagram is like the one Bill linked to in Reply #2, but may be easier to read. It's BSP 502-320-114, Issue 1, Dec., 1971 in the TCI library.
http://telephonecollectors.info/index.php/document-repository/doc_details/2780-502-320-414-i1-service-202b-c-d-hand-telephone-sets-tl
"C'est pas une restauration, c'est une rénovation."--François Martin.

Offline luns

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Re: Wiring a 202 with 5 wires to a 685A Subset
« Reply #26 on: October 02, 2015, 08:28:45 PM »
For anybody who might stumble into this thread, there's another closely related thread at http://www.classicrotaryphones.com/forum/index.php?topic=11465.0 where poplar1 shares two different BSPs for wiring to a 685A. The second one, 502-200-404 shows the same wiring diagram as has been shared in this thread.

However, I prefer the subset wiring in the first BSP in the other thread

211: [NOTE: Can also be used for 202]
BSP Section 502-320-400 Issue 2, January 1971
Service 211-Type Hand Telephone Sets

http://www.telephonecollectors.info/index.php/document-repository/doc_details/2773-502-320-400-i2-service-211-hand-telephone-sets-tl

In 502-200-404 and 502-320-414, L1 is jumpered to RR, with the BK and Y wires for the hookswitch/DP switch serve as a jumper from L2 to C. Terminal F is left floating.

In the 211 diagram, L2 is jumpered straight to C, and L1 is tied to F. The hookswitch/DP switch then connect from F to RR.

The important difference is the inclusion of terminal F. The 425B/D/E/F/J (but not 425K used for touch tone) network has a capacitor from this terminal, which together with the resistor of the equalizer, forms a snubber network for the dial contacts. This would serve to suppress RF interference, and should also help with the longevity of the dial contacts.

The L61A filter serves a similar purpose, and it may be that the BSPs that bypass F assume the presence of this filter. For desk sets without an L61 (and maybe even those with it), I see no reason not to take advantage of the snubber in the network.