Author Topic: Is this a real candlestick?  (Read 1541 times)

Offline Karen

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Is this a real candlestick?
« on: March 28, 2012, 09:10:41 PM »
http://www.ebay.com/itm/290690639574

I cant seem to find anything online for a model 24 AE.

I really want one.  I know its chipped but....  Is it even real? The guy says he cant find a date on it.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2012, 09:23:37 PM by AE_collector »

Offline LarryInMichigan

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Re: Is this a real candlestick?
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2012, 09:25:31 PM »
It looks like an AE21 stick.  The dial might be a type 24.  Perhaps the seller got the "type 24" from the back of the dial.  The receiver cord certainly does not look original.

Be aware that you will need a subset, or some substitution for one, to use this as a working phone.

Larry

Offline AE_Collector

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Re: Is this a real candlestick?
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2012, 09:26:06 PM »
I shortened your ebaY link down as these extra long links frequently cause problems on the forum. After itm in the link all that is needed is the 12 digit number.

Looks like an AE type 21 to me though the receiver cord looks a little supect! "Type 24" is referring to the AE dial itself.

Terry

<edit> Looks like Larry and I are in agreement! Both poosted at the same ime :)

Offline Karen

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Re: Is this a real candlestick?
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2012, 09:32:36 PM »
I thought the subset was just for a ringer?  You need it to work at all?

Offline Karen

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Re: Is this a real candlestick?
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2012, 09:35:38 PM »
Those cords are usually brown cloth, arent they??

Offline LarryInMichigan

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Re: Is this a real candlestick?
« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2012, 09:43:19 PM »
Yes, the cords would have been cloth, probably brown.

The subset contains the inductor coil and condenser needed by the phone in addition to the ringer.  There are various things that can be done to substitute for a subset, and they have been discussed here many times.

This phone is also missing the dial center ring assembly and the rubber ring which goes around the base.


Larry

Offline Karen

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Re: Is this a real candlestick?
« Reply #6 on: March 28, 2012, 09:47:40 PM »
Doesnt it seem like ALL these older phones are missing the dial center ring?? Its strange.

Offline Phonesrfun

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Re: Is this a real candlestick?
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2012, 10:10:35 PM »
If you buy a candlestick or a WE "D" mount (202) or a "B" mount (102), and a variety of other manufacturers phones from the 1920's and 1930's you are only getting half a phone.

The subset is the other half, and definitely needed in order to work.  That is, unless you buy a phone with a modern miniature network placed in the base of the phone.

We are so used to judging the size of telephone components by modern standards that we loose sight of the actual size of the inductors, capacitors, and ringers of days gone by.  Those components were so large and heavy that they had to be in a separate enclosure to allow for a suitable instrument on the desk that was light and portable enough to use.  The trade-off was the creation of the subscriber set, a.k.a. sub-set, with the desk stand or desk set tethered to it by a desk stand cord.

The real breakthrough in components occurred in the mid to late 1930's when Kellogg, AE, Western Electric, Stromberg-Carlson and others were finally able to make a phone that was all enclosed in one package and suitable for a desk.  The most talked about example of the "new" self-contained phone, of course, was the Western Electric 302, which first came out in 1937.

The rest, as they say, is history.
 
-Bill G

Offline AE_Collector

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Re: Is this a real candlestick?
« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2012, 12:02:53 AM »
The real breakthrough in components occurred in the mid to late 1930's when .....were finally able to make a phone that was all enclosed in one package and suitable for a desk.  

1928 (see my Avatar!). The AE #2, though there may have been others earlier than that outside of North America. Still a fairly large box initially. The AE 34 from 1934 was quite a bit smaller.

Terry

Offline Phonesrfun

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Re: Is this a real candlestick?
« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2012, 12:09:15 AM »
I knew I'd probably be in trouble by trying to tie it down to some exact years and manufacturers, but the point I was making is still valid.

 :P
-Bill G

Offline Karen

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Re: Is this a real candlestick?
« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2012, 12:11:15 AM »
Looks like its a good 200.00 purchase then, for both parts.  At least. 

Offline HowardPgh

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Re: Is this a real candlestick?
« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2012, 03:44:35 PM »
There seem to be 2 or more versions of this phone besides the internal circuitry.  Some have a bakelite base with a recessed dial like the Monophone.
Some have a brass base with the exposed dial.  Does number 21 and 42 designate sidetone and antisidetone?
I couldn't tell from the Ebay pic what type of base was on this.
Howard

Offline TelePlay

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Re: Is this a real candlestick?
« Reply #12 on: April 11, 2012, 09:55:51 PM »
For posterity, here's two listing photos.

The second photo shows the mouthpiece had a chunk broken out of it.

It sold for $125, with free shipping.
            John . . .