Author Topic: 1936 Telephone Almanac.  (Read 1366 times)

Offline Brinybay

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4379
1936 Telephone Almanac.
« on: November 11, 2012, 02:29:58 PM »
I went on an ebay buying spree of these the other day.  I just think these are cool looking.  I'm up to 11 of these now.  I need only two to complete the 30s, 38 & 39.  I bought a 1938, but the seller refunded my money because they accidentally doused it in coffee as they were packing it.  I'm sure another will turn up eventually.

This one is the best condition of all of them, near mint.  No stains, creases, or writing on it, just a few almost undetectable spots on the cover.  Staples are still shiny.
The idea that a four-year degree is the only path to worthwhile knowledge is insane.
 - Mike Row
e

Offline AE_Collector

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7490
  • AE 2 - AECo's 1st Self Contained Desk Phone 1925
Re: 1936 Telephone Almanac.
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2012, 02:52:17 PM »
Do you know what dates they were produced? I notice the one you posted says Winter Spring on it so maybe two per year? I see they were printed for the Subscribers!

They are similar to the BC Telephone "Telephone Talk" Employee magazines that I collect. They were produced from jan 1911 through Jan/Feb 1960. The frequency was monthly to begin with and then in the depression years they gradually slowed to quarterly. By the later 1930's they returned and stayed bi monthly. I have about 325 of the just over 400 issues now and I am into them for at least $1000.

Terry
« Last Edit: November 11, 2012, 02:55:28 PM by AE_collector »

Offline Brinybay

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4379
Re: 1936 Telephone Almanac.
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2012, 05:07:08 PM »
Do you know what dates they were produced? I notice the one you posted says Winter Spring on it so maybe two per year? I see they were printed for the Subscribers!


Terry

Funny you should mention that, I just noticed that the other day too.  The season designation appears beginning in 1935, it's not on the 34 edition.  I haven't looked to see if there are others with different seasons for the same year because I assumed it was annual.

Update:  I just noticed that at the bottom of the zodiac circle, it also says "Autumn - Summer", so these must be annual.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2012, 05:11:01 PM by Brinybay »
The idea that a four-year degree is the only path to worthwhile knowledge is insane.
 - Mike Row
e

Offline AE_Collector

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7490
  • AE 2 - AECo's 1st Self Contained Desk Phone 1925
Re: 1936 Telephone Almanac.
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2012, 05:12:11 PM »
poplar1 pointed out to me that all 4 sasons are shown on the cover, not just two of them. So who knows if they planned on changing to more than one issue per year but these listing all 4 seasons were likely it for the year.

Terry

Online twocvbloke

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4478
  • W.E. 500 DM
Re: 1936 Telephone Almanac.
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2012, 05:26:43 PM »
Looking at the pictures, they call Autumn by it's proper name, when did the designation of "Fall" start to come into play over there? ???

Offline Brinybay

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4379
Re: 1936 Telephone Almanac.
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2012, 03:34:06 PM »
Looking at the pictures, they call Autumn by it's proper name, when did the designation of "Fall" start to come into play over there? ???

The best answer I found was on Wikipedia:

Quote
Etymology

The word autumn comes from the Old French word autompne (automne in modern French), and was later normalised to the original Latin word autumnus.[7] There are rare examples of its use as early as the 12th century, but it became common by the 16th century.
Before the 16th century, harvest was the term usually used to refer to the season, as it is common in other West Germanic languages to this day (cf. Dutch herfst and German Herbst). However, as more people gradually moved from working the land to living in towns (especially those who could read and write, the only people whose use of language we now know), the word harvest lost its reference to the time of year and came to refer only to the actual activity of reaping, and autumn, as well as fall, began to replace it as a reference to the season.[8][9]
The alternative word fall for the season traces its origins to old Germanic languages. The exact derivation is unclear, with the Old English fiŠll or feallan and the Old Norse fall all being possible candidates. However, these words all have the meaning "to fall from a height" and are clearly derived either from a common root or from each other. The term came to denote the season in 16th century England, a contraction of Middle English expressions like "fall of the leaf" and "fall of the year".[10]
During the 17th century, English emigration to the British colonies in North America was at its peak, and the new settlers took the English language with them. While the term fall gradually became obsolete in Britain, it became the more common term in North America.[citation needed]
« Last Edit: November 12, 2012, 03:35:40 PM by Brinybay »
The idea that a four-year degree is the only path to worthwhile knowledge is insane.
 - Mike Row
e

Offline paul-f

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3001
    • Old Telephones as Entertainment!
Re: 1936 Telephone Almanac.
« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2012, 11:19:19 AM »
Do you know what dates they were produced?

1922 - 1963, except 1945.
Visit: paul-f.com         WE 500  Design_Line

.