Author Topic: More stuff and Ivory 302?  (Read 1524 times)

Offline MagicMo

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More stuff and Ivory 302?
« on: March 16, 2013, 09:01:58 PM »
I think this is an Ivory 302. I opened it up and took a few pics. All the dates are 1949. No cracks or chips but the handset mouthpiece is yellowed. Is there info on how to clean that?
Also check out what I thin may be an old pay phone??
Thanks,
Mo
Practice Kindness :)

Offline Gilas

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Re: More stuff and Ivory 302?
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2013, 10:31:49 PM »
Beautiful Ivory 302.  I have a 302 and the 354 in ivory and used the peroxide method on my 354 and it worked like a charm.

Mike

Offline G-Man

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  • Posts: 1957
Re: More stuff and Ivory 302?
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2013, 10:34:54 PM »
The 7-type coin collector is particularly valuable!! ISTR that Chicago was the last city to use them.

While the ivory 302 is interesting, I recently gave away a nice one since they are not currently bringing much money amongst collectors. However, it may be worthwhile to eBay it since the uninitiated are willing to pay insane amounts for colored Western Electric telephones.

The converted wallset is also of some value.

Offline G-Man

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  • Posts: 1957
Re: More stuff and Ivory 302?
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2013, 10:53:32 PM »
COIN COLLECTORS
Electrically Operated-for Central Battery Service Only
NO. 7 TYPE
       
   These are arranged so that a coin placed in the coin chute remains under control of the central office operator, who may refund or deposit it in the coin box.

    The coin collector is ordinarily connected to the telephone line so that it is necessary to drop a coin of the proper denomination into the box to signal central office.   This saves considerable time on the part of the operator.   It may be wired so that the coin need not be deposited until the operator requests it.    The switchboard cord circuits must be arranged for operation in connection with these coin collectors.

        All electrical circuits are insulated from the case.  The case has a heavy black japanned finish.

    Code                                ---Approx. Dimensions Inches---                          List Price
    No.            Arranged for          Length             Width           Depth                  Each
    7J                   Nickels                 8-3/16             5-5/8           4-7/8                $10.40
    7K                  Nickels               11-9/16              5-13/16       4-59/64            $10.60
The No. 7K has a larger coin box than the No. 7J.

Offline MagicMo

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Re: More stuff and Ivory 302?
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2013, 10:56:30 PM »

The converted wallset is also of some value.


Oh, I thought the wallset went with the coin collector. So they are independent of each other?
Thanks
Mo
Practice Kindness :)

Offline G-Man

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  • Posts: 1957
Re: More stuff and Ivory 302?
« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2013, 10:58:38 PM »
The wallset could have been used with it as could most any other common battery telephone.

Offline MagicMo

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Re: More stuff and Ivory 302?
« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2013, 11:05:54 PM »
Thank You for all the info, FYI the coin collector and subset is not mine. Someone I know might be selling it.
Thanks
Mo
Practice Kindness :)

Offline G-Man

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  • Posts: 1957
Re: More stuff and Ivory 302?
« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2013, 11:18:29 PM »
Other than the missing instruction card holder it seems to be in great shape.

I believe a TCI member may have spare instruction cards and keys.

From the TCI Library-

AT&T Spec 4465 - 7J and 7K Coin Collectors
http://www.telephonecollectors.info/index.php/document-repository/doc_details/3210-at-t-spec-4465-7j-and-7k-coin-collectors-tl


Offline G-Man

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  • Posts: 1957
Re: More stuff and Ivory 302?
« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2013, 12:31:38 AM »
From Telephony Magazine, 1981-

>>>>>The year was 1912. Home coin telephones [7-type] and nickel dropping were a way of
life for Chicago Telephone Company customers. Home coin phones have since become
a symbol of the past, but the nickel hasn’t.

Nearly 70 years later, a one-unit call still would cost about a nickel
under the rate request just filed by Illinois Bell.

Cecil Judd was part of that era. His 45-year telephone career began as an
installer in 1912 for Chicago Tel, a forerunner of Illinois Bell. He remembers
the home coin telephone of yore.


“Once a month the telephone collector came around with his keys,” recalls
Judd an 89 year old retiree. “If 30 nickels were in there, then subscribers paid
for their service for that month.”

One cent on each nickel over $1.50 was refunded. Anything under $1.50, and
the customer had to make up the difference.

“The company figured if customer used their telephones once a day, the
service would pay for itself,” Judd explains.<<<<<

Offline LarryInMichigan

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  • Posts: 5198
Re: More stuff and Ivory 302?
« Reply #9 on: March 17, 2013, 06:57:13 AM »
From Telephony Magazine, 1981-

>>>>>The year was 1912. Home coin telephones [7-type] and nickel dropping were a way of
life for Chicago Telephone Company customers. Home coin phones have since become
a symbol of the past, but the nickel hasn’t.

Nearly 70 years later, a one-unit call still would cost about a nickel
under the rate request just filed by Illinois Bell.

Cecil Judd was part of that era. His 45-year telephone career began as an
installer in 1912 for Chicago Tel, a forerunner of Illinois Bell. He remembers
the home coin telephone of yore.


“Once a month the telephone collector came around with his keys,” recalls
Judd an 89 year old retiree. “If 30 nickels were in there, then subscribers paid
for their service for that month.”

One cent on each nickel over $1.50 was refunded. Anything under $1.50, and
the customer had to make up the difference.

“The company figured if customer used their telephones once a day, the
service would pay for itself,” Judd explains.<<<<<


My mother always tells me that she remembers the phone in her grandmother's apartment in Chicago which required a nickel for each phone call.  She thought that it was a strange thing.

Larry