Author Topic: Testing one of my sticks with two subsets.  (Read 7792 times)

Offline Brinybay

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Re: Testing one of my sticks with two subsets.
« Reply #30 on: January 17, 2014, 04:07:45 AM »
These gongs can make a beautiful sound when adjusted right. They keep resonating for about 15 seconds after ringing stops.
Is there a ringer number on the yoke?
Most of the time you see these with low impedance ringers.

Dumb question, which part is the yoke?  I can only find a date stamp of II 38 on the underside of one of the ringer coils.  The gongs sound ok, but don't really resonate.  They seem to have a coating of "patine" and other crud, maybe even paint.  Perhaps with the help of some Brasso they will sound better.
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Offline unbeldi

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Re: Testing one of my sticks with two subsets.
« Reply #31 on: January 17, 2014, 04:41:19 AM »
These gongs can make a beautiful sound when adjusted right. They keep resonating for about 15 seconds after ringing stops.
Is there a ringer number on the yoke?
Most of the time you see these with low impedance ringers.

Dumb question, which part is the yoke?  I can only find a date stamp of II 38 on the underside of one of the ringer coils.  The gongs sound ok, but don't really resonate.  They seem to have a coating of "patine" and other crud, maybe even paint.  Perhaps with the help of some Brasso they will sound better.

The yoke is the bar that is attached with two nuts on each of the adjusting posts (brass) on both sides of the coils. It holds the pivot mount for the armature and clapper. By adjusting those nuts the distance between magnetic cores and the armature can optimized.  In addition, on your ringer the yoke also has an adjustment screw that limits the travel of the armature.

Typically the ringer model number is stamped into the metal on that yoke, or it is on a small brass or copper metal foil held by one of the nuts. Often it is hard to see the model number, but with some brushing and flash light, it may show up.

With a date of II 38, this is a very late issue of this ringer and it does look pretty new. That's probably why it has these high impedance coils (4300 ohms), similar to the B1A ringer (~4600 ohms), which was already out by this time.

Surprising to see the inverted gongs this late.  Not even the No. 9 catalog (1935) shows them anymore. I am wondering if this type of ringer (even with normal gongs) is still in the No. 10 catalog (~1939?), which I don't have.  Does anyone here?
« Last Edit: January 17, 2014, 04:44:41 AM by unbeldi »