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New Guy Questions

Started by Rexophone, August 15, 2021, 10:44:24 AM

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Rexophone

I am a new payphone owner and have several dumb questions to ask. I've collected regular phones and other early technologies for many years but this is the first time I have happened across a pay phone. I have tried to read as much as I could from your forum to avoid asking redundant questions, but here goes.

My estate sale phone is an Automatic Electric Code LPB-86-55. The instruction card indicates that it is a $.25 phone and that it does not return coins. This instruction card had been turned backward at some point where typed instructions were added-- local calls $.50.  The only thing that looks like a date is on the top of the vault--4-58-12.  I have attached photos, but they are not showing up in the preview screen.  If I did it wrong, I'll figure it out and post them shortly.

About what is the age of my phone? From what I gather, this particular style was made from may be the 50s through the 70s? I was a bit sad to see when I opened it up that many of the original electrode–mechanics were replaced in the mid-1970s with Teltronics boards. Am I correct to assume that this was an update, and not part of the original phone--as shipped?

I was able to find some information about the Teltronics SPC-1B1 backplane board, but have found nothing about the board mounted to the coin chute when using the numbers on the board-- GTE AE  HB 5010 on foil side and  1010-A ISS 3  on front.  The board is accompanied by count switches in the dime and nickel slots. Am I correct to assume this second board provided a more automated method for counting coins than the operator's bells, etc.? It has a number of jumpers that I assume are used to change the cost of a local call and make other adjustments. Does anyone have technical documentation on this board?

Why is there not a count switch on the quarter slot? -- Especially since this is a $.25 phone?


Rather than the electromechanical chute that deposits coins into the coin box or the coin return, mine has a long brass shoot that goes directly to the coin box. Am I correct that this would to have been part of the modification done to the phone when the Teltronics boards were added?

From what I have read I understand modifications like this reduced the cost of the equipment at the central office supporting the telephone, pushing some of the intelligence to the phone, but sometimes reducing features such as coin return. Is this correct?

Being a purist, and also delighting in electromechanical devices, I sort of wish I had an original chute and coin relay that fit this phone, but I guess that would be too much of a mess since I would need to replace a lot of the other modification as well (if the Teltronics boards are not original). I have seen several Automatic Electric coin relays/chutes on the Internet. What would the one that fits my phone look like?   

Is it appropriate to have the original coin relay/chute with the Teltronics SPC-1B1 backplane board?

Looking at photos of other Automatic Electric phones from the same era is mine, I also see another relay near the top of the coin mechanism. I have read it has something to do with counting nickels, but I have not found an explanation of how this is done and why. Would someone explain this relay?

My phone is also missing the coin box and coin box lid. I see a number of these on eBay and other places, but am unsure how to identify which would fit my Automatic Electric. How would I identify this?

Many thanks for your time and help! I have been having a great time learning about payphones from all that you have written!

Steve

dsk

Nice phone, have to admit that I do not know anything about that modern boards, but my guess is that depending on polarity it will dial out, and when you have inserted 2*25C it will open the transmitter so the other party may hear you.  ... at least  I hope it is that easy.

dsk

rdelius

this is a semi postpay set so there was no hopper for coins. they went directly into the vault. the blue board in the upper housing is a totaliser board, you can set the amount needed with jumpers.

Rexophone

Thank you both.  Just trying to learn.

Steve

poplar1

#4
Just to clarify, the LPB-8655 originally had a coin relay, but not a coin trap. Coins went directly into the vault, but the relay would short out the transmitter once the called party answered. Inserting coin(s) would release the short.

The relay was activated because of "reverse battery" -- that is, the battery to the calling line was reversed when the called party answered. Some ATAs are available that can be programmed for reverse battery on answer, so that a semi-postpay telephone like this one (whether with original coin relay or the PCB) could work just as it originally did -- that is, requiring a coin deposit on answer.
Mets-en, c'est pas de l'onguent!

"C'est pas une restauration, c'est une rénovation."--François Martin.

dsk

Then it works like my post pay phone connected to a Linksys ATA with a Dialgizmo pulse to tone converter.

dsk

RB

Hi Steve.
I think the relay at the top, was to aid in the counting of coins.
I don't recall any payphone accepting a nickel as enough for a call.
Early payphones would accept a dime for a local call, and you could use 2 nickels for a dime call.
The relay would hold the first nickel, and release after the second nickel was inserted, making a dime call.
This is just my opinion, I am getting old...
There are a couple payphone experts here that could clarify.

Rexophone

Thanks.  Upon further reading I think the upper board is called a totalizer?
So based on the original phone design, is the brass chute original?

Steve

Doug Rose

Quote from: RB on August 15, 2021, 04:43:25 PM
Hi Steve.
I think the relay at the top, was to aid in the counting of coins.
I don't recall any payphone accepting a nickel as enough for a call.


Rod....that hit me as my Dad would always answer the phone, " go ahead, it's your nickel"

He was born in 1913 and has been gone for 25 years. Not sure of any significance.

I haven't thought about that in a long time.  ;).....Doug
Kidphone

Jim Stettler

Quote from: Doug Rose on August 15, 2021, 09:29:01 PM
Rod....that hit me as my Dad would always answer the phone, " go ahead, it's your nickel"

He was born in 1913 and has been gone for 25 years. Not sure of any significance.

I haven't thought about that in a long time.  ;).....Doug

It is always good to note the things that make you remember. the memories shape you 'as they should" it makes life fuller.
JMO,
Jim
You live, You learn,
You die, you forget it all.

Doug Rose

Quote from: Jim Stettler on August 16, 2021, 01:48:27 AM

It is always good to note the things that make you remember. the memories shape you 'as they should" it makes life fuller.
JMO,
Jim

thanks Jim.....It caught me off me off guard. Very emotional ....Doug
Kidphone

poplar1

#11
Inflation calculator shows that 5 cents in 1935 = $1.00 today.

Many coin phones changed from 5 cents to 10 cents in 1952.
10 cents in 1952 = $1.03 in 2021 dollars.

https://www.usinflationcalculator.com/

That which cost $0.05 in 1935 would cost $.10 in 1952.

Modification for 10 cents service:

WE added an electromagnet (not a relay) in the upper housing to trap the first nickel deposit until a second nickel was inserted (except when you were already connected, for example, with the operator). AE had a different method on its prepay sets: the first nickel operated a microswitch that shorted the dial pulsing contacts until the second nickel was deposited.
Mets-en, c'est pas de l'onguent!

"C'est pas une restauration, c'est une rénovation."--François Martin.

FABphones

#12
Quote from: poplar1 on August 17, 2021, 09:49:35 AM
Inflation calculator shows that 5 cents in 1935 = $1.00 today.

Many coin phones changed from 5 cents to 10 cents in 1952.
10 cents in 1952 = $1.03 in 2021 dollars.

https://www.usinflationcalculator.com/

That which cost $0.05 in 1935 would cost $.10 in 1952.

Wow. Thanks for that. As a history buff, a healthy reminder of the price of a phone call back then in comparison with day to day living. I can only begin to imagine how unbelievably difficult life was compared with modern living.

The Great Depression 1929-1939.

History of the first payphone/phone booth:
https://time.com/4425102/public-telephone-booth-history/

A collector of  'Monochrome Phones with Sepia Tones'   ...and a Duck!
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Vintage Phones - 10% man made, 90% Tribble
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