Author Topic: Wood Receiver  (Read 381 times)

Offline wds

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Wood Receiver
« on: July 29, 2019, 04:35:15 PM »
I got this from an Australian Seller, it's a wood OST receiver.  It reminds me of the WE #122 OST, the magnet looks identical to the WE magnet.  I'm thinking it was made by WE company for some Asian market like Japan or China.  Does anyone know what those markings are on the inside of the cap?  The outside and inside of the receiver is wood, but the threads are a brass ring fitted into the wood.  Very cool receiver.
Dave

Offline RB

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Re: Wood Receiver
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2019, 07:12:28 PM »
First off, I don't know squat about wood receivers.
But that doesn't look like normal mfg markings.
I'm guessing an artisans mark????
I believe if that's wood, it prob needed to be turned on a lathe.
If they figured out how to automate a basic shell, I spose that may have been part of it???
but the threads, and such, would prob have been done by hand.
By a wood smith, by the name of Dr. H??? what was it? maybe a partnership?
and then a run or ser number.???
That's my guess

Offline Dan/Panther

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Re: Wood Receiver
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2019, 01:31:50 PM »
Are you sure it's wooden  ? Some of the early receivers have a brown appearance.

D/P

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Offline wds

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Re: Wood Receiver
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2019, 01:47:07 PM »
definitely wood.  definitely a WE magnet.   I know w.e. made phones for OKI and others before WWI, so I'm guessing it's from turn of the century.  Also, the shell is one piece, including the top where the terminals are.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2019, 10:26:35 AM by wds »
Dave

Offline Sargeguy

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Re: Wood Receiver
« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2019, 11:36:32 AM »
My guess is that it was made as a replacement by someone who did not have ready access to new transmitters and needed to replace the cracked shell of a 122AW.  This could have been due to war time disruption of trade, remoteness, or economics.  It was easier/more expedient to make their own so they reused the components and expertly crafted a replacement shell.  I have seen much cruder wooden receivers where this was the case.
Greg Sargeant
Providence, RI
TCI /ATCA #4409