Telephone Switching > Other Switching Technologies

W.E. selector switch #162

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Babybearjs:
I caught this on ebay.... tried to use my paypal credit, but had to pay cash instead... I understand these where use for railroading.... or were they a talley counter?  I'm anxious to see what it looks like and how it works.... wonder what I can use it for? would it work on my 1A1 system??   hope it come fast! I've never had one of these!

unbeldi:
Looks like a late version in metal housing, they used to be in wood boxes earlier.
You can't use these in anything connected to the PSTN.
You have to construct a special high-voltage network. These were used for selective ringing of way stations. The ringing codes are mechanically programmed and pulses sent over the line used anywhere from 100 V to 400 V direct current, depending on the length of the line. Also, the impedance of the telephone sets attached was several thousand ohms, something like 7500 Ω, IIRC, to permit having many of them on the same line, many more than would be found on a PSTN party line, for example.  The telephone set consisted typically of a 501A or 502A subset with a candlestick or transmitter arm.

Check out the RR catalogs and instructional documents in the TCI library. Those contain detailed info on these devices.

Babybearjs:
well, I got this today and was able to fill in some gaps.... first off, it was made by "General Communications Products, Inc." and has the W.E. #60AP selector in it. the original selector code is worn off except for the last digit of "2" I think the second number could have been a"8" but I'm not sure because most of the number is missing and the first number it totally gone.  its wired directly to the terminal strip as follows: L1, L2, 3,4, and 5. the B1, B2, and the EX terminals are disconnected and I don't know if they were originally attached to the selector, or something else.... also there is a part missing, possibly a capacitor... as there are 2 wires soldered together sticking up where the part would have mounted. now, it I connected L1 and L2 to a phone line and rang the circuit, would it make the selector work? this is A interesting toy.... as it could be used for all sorts of switching.... I took some pictures of the unit and will post them once they are looked over...  :)

unbeldi:

--- Quote from: Babybearjs on January 10, 2015, 02:11:04 PM ---well, I got this today and was able to fill in some gaps.... first off, it was made by "General Communications Products, Inc." and has the W.E. #60AP selector in it. the original selector code is worn off except for the last digit of "2" I think the second number could have been a"8" but I'm not sure because most of the number is missing and the first number it totally gone.  its wired directly to the terminal strip as follows: L1, L2, 3,4, and 5. the B1, B2, and the EX terminals are disconnected and I don't know if they were originally attached to the selector, or something else.... also there is a part missing, possibly a capacitor... as there are 2 wires soldered together sticking up where the part would have mounted. now, it I connected L1 and L2 to a phone line and rang the circuit, would it make the selector work? this is A interesting toy.... as it could be used for all sorts of switching.... I took some pictures of the unit and will post them once they are looked over...  :)

--- End quote ---

No, you can't use it on a phone line.  I wouldn't even have thought about connecting it to a phone line.  The selector operates by a sequence of high-voltage DC pulses.  It operates similarly to a Step-by-Step switch.  I don't know what the lowest workable voltage level is, but railway lines operated on anywhere from 400 Volts down to perhaps 100 V for very long lines, because they had to span long distances of hundreds of miles.  The selectors have dials inside that can be set for a specific pulse code to which the selector responds and consequently rings an attached way station phone.  The TCI library has railroad catalogs and manuals that explain much of this.

unbeldi:
Just looking up some stuff...

Western Electric made the No. 60B Test Set for diagnosing #60 Selectors.  The 60B Test Set requires 3 x 22V batteries to operate and the circuit diagram specifies an operating voltage of 60 to 120 volts, so that's probably what is minimally necessary to operate one of these.

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