Telephone Switching > Exchange Names, Area Codes etc

3-digit phone # on bottle

(1/8) > >>

Brinybay:
I forgot all about this.  I found this old dairy bottle several years ago while scuba diving.  I didn't understand at first why only the area code was on there (360 is an area code for part of Western Washington) until somebody told me it was from the days of old crank phones where you told the operator the exchange you wanted.  At least that's what I was told, I'm not sure.

Steve K:
That is correct but not all the phones on manual exchanges had cranks (magnetos).  Those were often on the rural lines and in the city one usually just had a standard phone without a dial.  Lifting the receiver signaled the operator who then asked what number you wanted and in this case you would have said "360" to get the Bremerton Creamery.

BDM:

--- Quote from: Steve K on April 03, 2009, 10:13:46 AM ---That is correct but not all the phones on manual exchanges had cranks (magnetos).  Those were often on the rural lines and in the city one usually just had a standard phone without a dial.  Lifting the receiver signaled the operator who then asked what number you wanted and in this case you would have said "360" to get the Bremerton Creamery.

--- End quote ---

Crank/magneto sets were used on local battery (LB) networks. Common battery (CB) networks didn't use crank/magneto for signaling. Since the TelCo powered the network, simply lifting the receiver signaled the operator by causing both a lamp and buzzer combo to go off. Though, some early CB networks did have push-button signaling.

LB obviously lacked common network power. Again, later LB networks did have a light to indicate a subscriber was off-hook. But audible signaling came from you, through the magneto.

That's the way I understand it ;)

bingster:
Keep in mind that area codes didn't exist until the late 1940s, and weren't actually used until the late 1950s/early '60s.  The "360" on the bottle is the entire phone number of the Bremerton Creamery.  The fact that the number on the bottle matches the later area code is pure coincidence.

There were so few phones in use in that town that the phone numbers didn't have to go very high.  Some places were so rural, that they actually had phone numbers that were only two digits.

Steve K:
Those rural two digit numbers were often the ring cadence.  My dad's home number was 8030-R4 which was 4 short rings.  Some of the nearby communities has numbers like 22-F-11 which was one long and one short ring.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version